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Electronic - Released December 3, 2012 | XL Recordings

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Electronic - Released November 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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"Change? Never. You can evolve, add things, but why would you want to change? What’s the point?" Liam Howlett, the brains behind The Prodigy, was very clear in 2015 upon the release of The Day is My Enemy, the last album from the British group who created a fierce mix of techno, jungle, punk and hip-hop know as big beat at the start of the 90s. This new album confirms that the trio still don’t plan on straying from their path, the path of making infernal noise with the objective of blowing up the stage.Mutant synth gimmicks, motor engine-like noise, brutal bass-lines, punchy intros, thrashing guitars: like all Prodigy albums No Tourists is like running through a blitz. Partly put together in hotel rooms, the album also includes a collaboration with New Jersey punk-rap duo Ho99o9 on the track Fight Fire with Fire, a riot rallying call on which Howlett dives deep into the hardcore. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic - Released June 30, 1997 | XL Recordings

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Electronic - Released March 2, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

Twenty years after England's Summer of Love, rave had made a comeback -- at least in indie circles -- and Liam Howlett's Prodigy, the only original rave group still going (anyone remember Altern-8?), could hardly have done worse than jump aboard. But Invaders Must Die is a curious nu-rave record, as though the sound of 1991 (such as their Top Ten hit "Charly") has been filtered through the sound of 1996 (such as their number one, "Firestarter") to emerge as nothing more than a hodgepodge of uptempo dance music with extroverted beats and grimy basslines. If that sounds basically like your average electronica record circa the turn of the millennium (albeit produced by one of its greatest heroes), then you're a long way towards understanding what this nu-rave record from the Prodigy sounds like. Add a few period-appropriate cues -- unfiltered synth or keyboard runs, ring-the-alarm effects, samples of divas or ragga chatters (sped-up and slowed-down, respectively) -- and you get a strange album indeed. The single "Omen" is a good example, although it has few qualities to recommend it beyond its basic energy; tellingly, it's a rare co-production, with James Rushent from Does It Offend You, Yeah?. The other two tracks with the most rave signals are "Take Me to the Hospital" and "Warrior's Dance," which both sound like follow-ups to "Charly" or "Out of Space" filtered through the darkside strains of latter-day hardcore techno (aka 4Hero's "Mr. Kirk's Nightmare"). And as usual with the Prodigy -- going back to Music for the Jilted Generation -- there's plenty of polemics and struggle, most of it delivered in shouted, sloganeering fashion by Keith Flint and Maxim (who are both back in the fold after being absent from the previous Prodigy record, Always Outnumbered, Never Outgunned). Howlett is no slouch in the production chair, and the sounds are mostly blinding, but the songs are strictly by-the-books. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released April 4, 1994 | XL Recordings

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Electronic - Released March 30, 2015 | Take Me To The Hospital

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Refusing to grow old gracefully, veteran ravers the Prodigy offer a wobbly, angry album with their sixth studio effort The Day Is My Enemy, an LP that supports titles like "Nasty" and "Destroy" with stadium-sized beats and '90s chants, as if they were what the kids were clamoring for in 2015. Even if they weren't, Liam Howlett and company have decided they need it, and collaborated in a way that makes this the most "band" Prodigy album in ages, something that benefits the twitchy disco number "Wild Frontier" and the aptly titled "Rhythm Bomb" with guest producer Flux Pavilion providing the rave sound of today. "Rok-Weiler" is a fashion-minded and fierce highlight that fits the band's catalog the same way the great "Paninaro" fit with the Pet Shop Boys, and as far as Howlett the musical innovator, there are plenty of new video game noises, wormholes of time, and tricky vocal edits that are razor-sharp. Add the way "Roadblox" provides the cinematic side of Prodigy that's often overlooked and the album seems a triumph, but lead single "Nasty" is a lesser "Firestarter" and at 14 cuts, this chunky effort is built for returning fan club members and not the EP-craving EDM crowd. © David Jeffries /TiVo

Electronic - Released July 1, 1994 | XL Recordings

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The Prodigy's response to the sweeping legislation and crackdown on raves contained in 1994's Criminal Justice Bill is an effective statement of intent. Pure sonic terrorism, Music for the Jilted Generation employs the same rave energy that charged their debut, Experience, up the charts in Britain, but yokes it to a cause other than massive drug intake. Compared to their previous work, the sound is grubbier and less reliant on samples; the effect moved the Prodigy away from the American-influenced rave and acid house of the past and toward a uniquely British vision of breakbeat techno that was increasingly allied to the limey invention of drum'n'bass. As on Experience, there are so many great songs here that first-time listeners would be forgiven for thinking of a greatest-hits compilation instead of a proper studio album. After a short intro, the shattering of panes of glass on "Break & Enter" catapults the album ahead with a propulsive flair. Each of the four singles -- "Voodoo People," "Poison," "No Good (Start the Dance)," and "One Love" -- are excellent, though album tracks like "Speedway" and "Their Law" (with help from Pop Will Eat Itself) don't slip up either. If Experience seemed like an excellent fluke, Music for the Jilted Generation is the album that announced the Prodigy were on the charts to stay. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released September 21, 1992 | XL Recordings

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Electronic - Released March 30, 2015 | Take Me To The Hospital

Refusing to grow old gracefully, veteran ravers the Prodigy offer a wobbly, angry album with their sixth studio effort The Day Is My Enemy, an LP that supports titles like "Nasty" and "Destroy" with stadium-sized beats and '90s chants, as if they were what the kids were clamoring for in 2015. Even if they weren't, Liam Howlett and company have decided they need it, and collaborated in a way that makes this the most "band" Prodigy album in ages, something that benefits the twitchy disco number "Wild Frontier" and the aptly titled "Rhythm Bomb" with guest producer Flux Pavilion providing the rave sound of today. "Rok-Weiler" is a fashion-minded and fierce highlight that fits the band's catalog the same way the great "Paninaro" fit with the Pet Shop Boys, and as far as Howlett the musical innovator, there are plenty of new video game noises, wormholes of time, and tricky vocal edits that are razor-sharp. Add the way "Roadblox" provides the cinematic side of Prodigy that's often overlooked and the album seems a triumph, but lead single "Nasty" is a lesser "Firestarter" and at 14 cuts, this chunky effort is built for returning fan club members and not the EP-craving EDM crowd. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Electronic - Released August 4, 2008 | XL Recordings

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Electronic - Released September 14, 2004 | XL Recordings

The Prodigy's main man, Liam Howlett, said in an interview that usual bandmembers Keith Flint and Maxim weren't on the new album because this is a back-to-the-core record, one to find the soul of the Prodigy (dancer Leeroy Thornhill left the band years ago -- losing your dancer, always crippling). For anyone rooting for the band, it sounded like a good deal. Howlett came off as a mad beat scientist of great genius on his goin'-it-alone CD The Dirtchamber Sessions, Vol. 1, rockin' the beats with mad style and blowing the dust off Babe Ruth's "The Mexican" just to prove how he was cooler than you. It was a sweet mix, but then nothing -- and then it got worse. But at least Howlett himself called 2002's dull "Baby's Got a Temper" single an F'n piece of S. Seems like he was well aware things were going wrong and has gotten himself back on the right track, so let's all go nuts for Prodigy again. Twiddling the knobs and making noises fly every which way, Howlett is working hard throughout Always Outnumbered, Never Outgunned and with clean, punch-in-the-gut bass like this, there isn't a better record to sell those gigantic, "you'll have to take your backseat out" kickboxes. But take someone who just barely follows electronic music, tell him or her this is an everyday KMFDM record, and they'll fall for it. Nothing against KMFDM. They've got their rightfully sleazy place, but this is the Prodigy and Always Outnumbered is just loud workout music for the jilted generation. Lyrics? Try "Gimme! gimme! gimme!" and "You got to push it!" Not that "Change my picture/Smack my bitch up" was brilliant, but it was incongruous enough to have you going, "why do I keep singing this?" There's an inspired list of guest stars on this album -- Princess Superstar, Kool Keith, Liam Gallagher, Twista, Juliette Lewis -- but either their voices are so filtered it could be anyone or they're given nothing more to do than yell "go, man, go." Howlett had been all "I've got something to prove with this" in the press, but very little of that spirit comes through on the album. "Girls" is a good electro roller and steps ahead of "Baby's Got a Temper," while the surprisingly different and slinky "Phoenix" is proof Howlett hasn't totally lost it. Plus, you're bound to fall for at least one of the generic fist-pumpers. They do have that whipping sting in the tail of which Howlett is the master. That's barely enough for five years of waiting and hardly up to the old standard. That Always Outnumbered is no good reason for teens to put the Playstation controller down and rejoin the mainstream techno revolution is disappointing. As crazy as those glowstick kids could be, Prodigy concerts should have more than boring old farts who don't dance standing around. There's little of that rebellious and over-the-top excitement here, and that's bad news for those on the fringe of Prodigy fandom. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Electronic - Released October 17, 2005 | XL Recordings

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Electronic - Released March 2, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

Twenty years after England's Summer of Love, rave had made a comeback -- at least in indie circles -- and Liam Howlett's Prodigy, the only original rave group still going (anyone remember Altern-8?), could hardly have done worse than jump aboard. But Invaders Must Die is a curious nu-rave record, as though the sound of 1991 (such as their Top Ten hit "Charly") has been filtered through the sound of 1996 (such as their number one, "Firestarter") to emerge as nothing more than a hodgepodge of uptempo dance music with extroverted beats and grimy basslines. If that sounds basically like your average electronica record circa the turn of the millennium (albeit produced by one of its greatest heroes), then you're a long way towards understanding what this nu-rave record from the Prodigy sounds like. Add a few period-appropriate cues -- unfiltered synth or keyboard runs, ring-the-alarm effects, samples of divas or ragga chatters (sped-up and slowed-down, respectively) -- and you get a strange album indeed. The single "Omen" is a good example, although it has few qualities to recommend it beyond its basic energy; tellingly, it's a rare co-production, with James Rushent from Does It Offend You, Yeah?. The other two tracks with the most rave signals are "Take Me to the Hospital" and "Warrior's Dance," which both sound like follow-ups to "Charly" or "Out of Space" filtered through the darkside strains of latter-day hardcore techno (aka 4Hero's "Mr. Kirk's Nightmare"). And as usual with the Prodigy -- going back to Music for the Jilted Generation -- there's plenty of polemics and struggle, most of it delivered in shouted, sloganeering fashion by Keith Flint and Maxim (who are both back in the fold after being absent from the previous Prodigy record, Always Outnumbered, Never Outgunned). Howlett is no slouch in the production chair, and the sounds are mostly blinding, but the songs are strictly by-the-books. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released May 23, 2011 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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The Prodigy have been the most galvanizing live act in dance music for nearly as long as some of their present-day fans have been alive: from the early Experience days in the early '90s through "Firestarter" and right into the new millennium via Invaders Must Die, their 2009 return to form. Still, World's on Fire is their first official live recording. (Canny listeners might actually think the world’s on fire after a few minutes of listening to Maxim and Keith Flint’s nearly endless commands to the crowd -- "Stand up!," "Make some no-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-ise!" -- but they were on solid ground with fans, since this was the Prodigy's own Warrior's Dance festival at the Milton Keynes Bowl in July 2010.) All the hits are in attendance, spread throughout each major era, although most of the earliest and best come later, including the ending trifecta of "Everybody in the Place," "Their Law," and "Out of Space." The energy on display is impressive, and it's hardly a bad keepsake of actually seeing Howlett & co. in action, but as usual for live albums from dance acts, there are few substitutes for the real thing. [A video on the CD/DVD edition includes the full show as well as other live highlights, including an excellent selection of tracks from all over the world as well as short tour films from Japan, the U.S., and the U.K.] © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released November 10, 1997 | XL Recordings

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Electronic - Released November 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

"Change? Never. You can evolve, add things, but why would you want to change? What’s the point?" Liam Howlett, the brains behind The Prodigy, was very clear in 2015 upon the release of The Day is My Enemy, the last album from the British group who created a fierce mix of techno, jungle, punk and hip-hop know as big beat at the start of the 90s. This new album confirms that the trio still don’t plan on straying from their path, the path of making infernal noise with the objective of blowing up the stage.Mutant synth gimmicks, motor engine-like noise, brutal bass-lines, punchy intros, thrashing guitars: like all Prodigy albums No Tourists is like running through a blitz. Partly put together in hotel rooms, the album also includes a collaboration with New Jersey punk-rap duo Ho99o9 on the track Fight Fire with Fire, a riot rallying call on which Howlett dives deep into the hardcore. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic - Released October 17, 2005 | XL Recordings

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Electronic - Released July 1, 2002 | XL Recordings

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Electronic - Released October 3, 2005 | XL Recordings

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Electronic - Released November 11, 1996 | XL Recordings

"Breathe" was the follow-up single to "Firestarter," the smash that made Prodigy superstars everywhere except America (that would follow later, when "Firestarter" was given a promotional push by Maverick several months after its initial release). At first listen, "Breathe" was a bit of a disappointment, since it was more straightforward than its predecessor, but repeated plays revealed it to be a fine crossover single. The B-sides on the British single contained the solid new studio cut "The Trick," plus nondescript live versions of "Their Law" and "Poison." The A-side, by the way, was an edit. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

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The Prodigy in the magazine
  • Another Blitz
    Another Blitz "Change? Never. You can evolve, add things, but why would you want to change? What’s the point?"