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Alternative & Indie - Released April 2, 2012 | Nul Records

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Pop - Released October 1, 2004 | 679 Recordings UK. Ltd.

On their self-titled full-length debut, the Futureheads turn the promise of their early EPs and singles into an almost relentlessly playful, lively, and smart album of zippy post-punk-pop. Even though shades of XTC, the Jam, and Gang of Four (whose Andy Gill produced the album) jump out at almost every turn on Futureheads, the band's chiming, precise vocal harmonies -- which sound more British Invasion than new wave -- give their sound a distinctive kick. And, while they follow in roughly the same footsteps that other post-punk/new wave renovators like their friends Franz Ferdinand, the Futureheads sound too spazzy to be quite that fashionable; likewise, they're bouncy and danceable without being tied into the increasingly tired dance-punk sound. Futureheads includes a few songs from the 123 Nul and First Day EPs, and while the album doesn't exactly suffer from the inclusion of tracks like "Robot," "Carnival Kids," and "First Day," the band's newer work shows how they've already refined and expanded their sound since they wrote these songs. With its slower pace and doo wop-inspired vocal arrangement, "Danger of the Water" finds the group trying on different ideas for size. The breezy "Meantime" and "Trying Not to Think About Time" stretch and snap in all directions, with tight dynamic shifts and wound-up melodies. As distinctive as the Futureheads' sound is, the album's standout track is a cover: their tremendous version of Kate Bush's "Hounds of Love" captures the breathless buzz of falling in love. It's the perfect combination of the band's thrilling sound and strong, evocative songwriting, a department in which the band's own work can fall a little flat: individually, tracks like "Le Garage," "He Knows," and "Alms" are bracing fun, but they tend to blur together within the album's context. Fortunately, singles like "A to B" and "Decent Days and Nights" and final track "Man Ray" show that the Futureheads can write songs that don't just depend on their emphatic delivery. While a little more depth in their songwriting would make them unstoppable, the Futureheads' first full-length is an undeniably exciting debut that just gets better with repeated listens. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 17, 2006 | 679 Recordings UK. Ltd.

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Pop - Released June 28, 2004 | Rhino Atlantic

On their self-titled full-length debut, the Futureheads turn the promise of their early EPs and singles into an almost relentlessly playful, lively, and smart album of zippy post-punk-pop. Even though shades of XTC, the Jam, and Gang of Four (whose Andy Gill produced the album) jump out at almost every turn on Futureheads, the band's chiming, precise vocal harmonies -- which sound more British Invasion than new wave -- give their sound a distinctive kick. And, while they follow in roughly the same footsteps that other post-punk/new wave renovators like their friends Franz Ferdinand, the Futureheads sound too spazzy to be quite that fashionable; likewise, they're bouncy and danceable without being tied into the increasingly tired dance-punk sound. Futureheads includes a few songs from the 123 Nul and First Day EPs, and while the album doesn't exactly suffer from the inclusion of tracks like "Robot," "Carnival Kids," and "First Day," the band's newer work shows how they've already refined and expanded their sound since they wrote these songs. With its slower pace and doo wop-inspired vocal arrangement, "Danger of the Water" finds the group trying on different ideas for size. The breezy "Meantime" and "Trying Not to Think About Time" stretch and snap in all directions, with tight dynamic shifts and wound-up melodies. As distinctive as the Futureheads' sound is, the album's standout track is a cover: their tremendous version of Kate Bush's "Hounds of Love" captures the breathless buzz of falling in love. It's the perfect combination of the band's thrilling sound and strong, evocative songwriting, a department in which the band's own work can fall a little flat: individually, tracks like "Le Garage," "He Knows," and "Alms" are bracing fun, but they tend to blur together within the album's context. Fortunately, singles like "A to B" and "Decent Days and Nights" and final track "Man Ray" show that the Futureheads can write songs that don't just depend on their emphatic delivery. While a little more depth in their songwriting would make them unstoppable, the Futureheads' first full-length is an undeniably exciting debut that just gets better with repeated listens. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2008 | Nul Recordings

The Futureheads made a bold move by releasing This Is Not the World on their own label, Nul Records. However, that might be the boldest thing about it -- This Is Not the World often feels like the band's take on a pop album, full of streamlined, punchy songs that aren't exactly dumbed-down, but do sound much more straightforward than any of the Futureheads' earlier music. Trying to keep up with all the harmonies, quick tempo changes, and razor-sharp riffs the band crammed into The Futureheads and News and Tributes was a big part of what made those albums so appealing and rewarding on repeated listens, so This Is Not the World's simpler approach is a little disappointing. It's also a bit surprising, considering how ambitious and introspective News and Tributes was, but where that album looked inward, This Is Not the World is almost all action; even "Hard to Bear," some post-breakup friendly advice that's the closest thing to a ballad here, gallops along at a relatively brisk clip. "The Beginning of the Twist" and "Think Tonight" prove that the album's glossy production didn't hinder the band's energy at all -- drummer Dave Hyde's playing is so propulsive, it's almost tangible -- yet too often, the energy the band pumps into these songs is more memorable than the songs themselves. None of them are actively bad (not even the oddly Proclaimers-esque "Walking Backwards"), but "Work Is Never Done" and "See What You Want to See" feel worryingly like they were drafted from the same revved-up template. Fortunately, more than a few moments balance the quirky urgency of the Futureheads' earlier work with their simpler aesthetic here: "Broke Up the Time" is a classic Futureheads song, barreling along with call-and-response riffs and harmonies and leaving plenty of hooks in its wake. "Radio Heart" stutters and croons a tune about tuning into true love, with jagged guitars and spooky backing vocals that make it just strange enough. "Sleet" is aggressive and flirty at the same time, pairing rapid-fire drums with cheeky lyrics like "Let's go to bed, but let's not go to sleep." "Sale of the Century" is another standout, giving some of News and Tributes' leftover angst an angry focus with a sputtering one-note guitar solo and more of Hyde's outstanding drumming. These songs are so good, so effortless, that they end up highlighting how just-OK a lot of the album is. It's mildly disappointing that the Futureheads' first independently released music sounds more conventional than what they issued on other labels, but This Is Not the World is still a solidly enjoyable album on its own terms. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 30, 2019 | Nul Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 12, 2010 | Nul Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 23, 2012 | Nul Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 9, 2008 | Nul Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 1, 2019 | Nul Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 21, 2005 | 679 Recordings UK. Ltd.

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 3, 2019 | Nul Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 28, 2010 | Nul Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 19, 2012 | Nul Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 1, 2010 | Nul Records

The Futureheads’ previous album This Is Not the World left the band at an impasse -- with neither News & Tributes’ grand scale nor The Futureheads’ quirky focus, it often felt dangerously close to ordinary. At first, The Chaos seems to follow suit, offering a similar mix of glossy, ‘80s-tinged rockers (the title track, “Sun Goes Down”) and clever-yet-straightforward radio songs like “Struck Dumb” and “Heartbeat Song,” both of which edge the band closer to the mainstream. But just when it feels like the album is going to be quintessentially “solid”, The Chaos gets interesting. The Futureheads’ quirks and ambitions reassert themselves in ever stranger and, er, more ambitious ways. “Stop the Noise”’s call-and-response vocals and “The Connector”’s ultra-angular riffs could have appeared on The Futureheads, while “The Baron” and “This Is the Life” are jammed full of busy guitars and lyrics like “it’s great to see a smile on your miserable face,” and question expectations playfully like the band’s best songs do. Even less successful experiments such as the earnest “Dart at the Map” and the theatrical, largely six-minute a cappella final track, “Jupiter,” have a passion missing from some of the album’s more workmanlike tracks. Yet, as The Chaos teeters between slick professionalism and rampant expression, it still sounds like the Futureheads are having more fun here than they have in quite some time. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 12, 2010 | Nul Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 4, 2010 | Nul Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 3, 2008 | Nul Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 18, 2008 | Nul Recordings

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Rock - Released June 17, 2012 | Nul Records