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Pop - Released May 31, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released July 19, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released July 19, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released July 19, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released July 19, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released May 31, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 27, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released July 19, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Although the Dave Clark Five would continue to release a good deal of music through the early 1970s, Everybody Knows, issued in early 1968, was -- oddly, considering how massively popular the band had been in the U.S. in the mid-'60s -- their final non-compilation American LP. Perhaps that was because by 1968, the DC5 could no longer count on having their name alone sell substantial copies of albums, having had their final U.S. Top Ten single the previous year. Everybody Knows did have a couple mild American hits, the ham-fisted soul-rocker "You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby" and the rather treacly ballad "Everybody Knows" (an entirely different song than their 1964 Top 20 hit of the same title, and a much bigger hit in their native U.K., where it reached number two). "Everybody Knows," which unusually featured Lenny Davidson rather than customary chief DC5 singer Mike Smith on lead vocals, sounded something like the ballads with which Engelbert Humperdinck was rising to fame around the same time. Despite its success, that's not what most fans come to DC5 records to hear, so it might be a relief to learn that it's not typical of the rest of the LP, though none of the other songs were among their better work. Some of them saw the group competently, if not excitingly, adapt to trends in late-'60s production with an increased brassiness, as they do on the soul-pop tunes "A Little Bit Now" and "Inside and Out." "Red and Blue," meanwhile, gets into more wistful densely produced late-'60s pop, and just edged into the Top 100; one can imagine "I'll Do the Best I Can," one of the better tracks, as filler on a Walker Brothers record. Other songs are more or less similar to their mid-'60s sound, although with slightly more updated production. It adds up to an album that has some appeal for serious Dave Clark Five fans, but isn't essential listening for more discriminating listeners. ~ Richie Unterberger
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Pop - Released March 23, 2016 | Rarity Music

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Pop - Released September 27, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Rock - Released March 27, 2019 | Play Music

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Pop - Released September 27, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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World - Released August 24, 2017 | RHI

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Pop - Released September 27, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Depending on your outlook, this was either one album too many for the Dave Clark Five, or an essential step in their survival after the mid-'60s. By 1966, the Beatles, and even the Rolling Stones, were using sitars on their records; Brian Wilson was composing concept albums and vest-pocket pop symphonies, and folk-rock was so well established as a commercial music genre that its inventors, the Byrds, were compelled to find some new wrinkles to maintain their edge. In that environment, it was inevitable that the DC5 would allow their music to evolve. From the crisp piano chords and lean, restrained guitar and sax sound, as well as the upbeat tone of Try Too Hard there was change in the air from the opening seconds of this LP. "I Never Will" is another cheerful and tuneful rocker with a gorgeous modulation, and "Looking In" is a similarly lyrical piece of rock 'n' roll, driven more by its piano and rhythm guitar parts (all punctuated by a soaring chorus), than by the honking saxes or pounding organ of prior years. "Ever Since You've Been Away" sounds like a theme from a lost western movie (in fact, the melody and the break are very similar to the theme from Hang 'Em High, written a year later). The one track that might not work is the much too retro "Scared Of Falling In Love," but most of the rest makes for an enjoyable, still exciting, if somewhat softer, permutation of their basic sound. ~ Bruce Eder
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Pop - Released July 19, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 27, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Pop - Released July 19, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released September 27, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Pop - Released July 19, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released September 27, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Weekend in London was the least-commercially successful of the Dave Clark Five's first six Epic albums. The slow, bass-driven "Come Home" was the album's hit, just reaching the Top 15 in America. The crunchy-with-horns "I'm Thinking" was recycled as the flip side of "Reelin' and Rockin'" a year later and "bubbled under" Billboard's Top 100. The album is a mixed bag of originals and covers of '50s hits like "Blue Suede Shoes" and "Little Bitty Pretty One," following the de facto formula for British Invasion records. The band's own songs vacillate between the pretty Beatlesque pop of "Your Turn to Cry" and moody rockers similar to early Zombies. The Dave Clark Five were putting out about three albums a year at this time, and in spite of its high points, Weekend in London sounds like they were being stretched a little too thin. ~ Greg Adams