Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD£12.49

Rock - Released April 7, 2008 | Polydor Records

The long-awaited debut by neo-Brit-pop quartet the Courteeners fits neatly into the continuum of big brash guitar bands from Manchester, with hints of the Smiths (including a typically fine production job by Stephen Street), the Stone Roses (occasional flirtations both with '60s-style jangle pop and psychedelia), and Oasis (frontman Liam Fray's big mouth and apparent lack of internal censor, both of which have already made him a popular interview subject for the U.K. music press) coloring these 12 songs. Now, Fray is not the equal of those bands as either a distinctive frontman or as an instantly memorable songwriter, but the best parts of St. Jude are at least superior to, say, Menswear or Cast. Tracks like the singles "What Took You So Long?" and "Not Nineteen Forever" fairly leap out of the gate, all jangly guitar lines and galloping rhythm sections, topped with Fray's endearingly yobbish vocals and unabashed sentimental lyrical streak, and the more measured material throws enough changeups to keep the album from getting tiring. Time will tell whether the Courteeners have more than one good album in them, but there is always room for this spirited take on British indie rock. © Stewart Mason /TiVo

Alternative & Indie - Released August 18, 2014 | [PIAS] Cooperative

Download not available
The Courteeners' fourth studio album, 2014's Concrete Love, is a sweeping, organically layered, '80s-influenced effort. Building upon the anthemic synth pop of their previous 2013 album, Anna, the Manchester outfit delve even deeper into a layered post-punk sound that finds them adding more guitars and even strings on some cuts. Featured here are such singles as the driving "How Good It Was" and the romantic "Summer." © Matt Collar /TiVo
From
CD£13.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Polydor Records

The long-awaited debut by neo-Brit-pop quartet the Courteeners fits neatly into the continuum of big brash guitar bands from Manchester, with hints of the Smiths (including a typically fine production job by Stephen Street), the Stone Roses (occasional flirtations both with '60s-style jangle pop and psychedelia), and Oasis (frontman Liam Fray's big mouth and apparent lack of internal censor, both of which have already made him a popular interview subject for the U.K. music press) coloring these 12 songs. Now, Fray is not the equal of those bands as either a distinctive frontman or as an instantly memorable songwriter, but the best parts of St. Jude are at least superior to, say, Menswear or Cast. Tracks like the singles "What Took You So Long?" and "Not Nineteen Forever" fairly leap out of the gate, all jangly guitar lines and galloping rhythm sections, topped with Fray's endearingly yobbish vocals and unabashed sentimental lyrical streak, and the more measured material throws enough changeups to keep the album from getting tiring. Time will tell whether the Courteeners have more than one good album in them, but there is always room for this spirited take on British indie rock. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
From
HI-RES£13.49
CD£9.49

Alternative & Indie - Released August 18, 2014 | [PIAS] Cooperative

Hi-Res
The Courteeners' fourth studio album, 2014's Concrete Love, is a sweeping, organically layered, '80s-influenced effort. Building upon the anthemic synth pop of their previous 2013 album, Anna, the Manchester outfit delve even deeper into a layered post-punk sound that finds them adding more guitars and even strings on some cuts. Featured here are such singles as the driving "How Good It Was" and the romantic "Summer." © Matt Collar /TiVo

Alternative & Indie - Released August 18, 2014 | [PIAS] Cooperative

Download not available
The Courteeners' fourth studio album, 2014's Concrete Love, is a sweeping, organically layered, '80s-influenced effort. Building upon the anthemic synth pop of their previous 2013 album, Anna, the Manchester outfit delve even deeper into a layered post-punk sound that finds them adding more guitars and even strings on some cuts. Featured here are such singles as the driving "How Good It Was" and the romantic "Summer." © Matt Collar /TiVo
From
CD£8.49

Alternative & Indie - Released October 28, 2016 | Ignition

A decade into their career, Manchester quartet the Courteeners bring a little levity with their fifth LP, Mapping the Rendezvous. Combining sonic touchstones from throughout their catalog -- angular post-punk, neo-Brit-pop, and polished new wave -- they produced one of their strongest works, as addictive as anything on Anna and Concrete Love. Like contemporaries Kaiser Chiefs and Two Door Cinema Club, they've evolved from their indie rock early days, favoring melody and pop-leaning numbers that inspire more dancing than rocking out. Rendezvous is a lot of fun, especially on bouncy ditties like "Tip Toes," "The Dilettante," "Not for Tomorrow," "No One Will Ever Replace Us," and the Phoenix-lite "Modern Love." Highlights include the devilishly cool "Lucifer's Dreams," one of a handful of urgent dance-rock songs that recall the aforementioned Kaisers, and the sexy "Kitchen," a throwback that sounds like Robert Palmer fronting INXS (or simply a muscular version of the 1975). Falcon fans will appreciate slower moments like the Morrissey-esque "De la Salle" and "Most Important," a touching ode that combines the tribal drums of Yeah Yeah Yeahs' "Maps" with the Courteeners' own "Lullaby." A nod to their Brit-pop influences is found on the grand "Finest Hour," a slow-building track that ends with a fanfare worthy of Blur's "The Universal." Mapping the Rendezvous might not appease those fans still waiting for the return of St. Jude, but eight years after their debut, the Courteeners have grown up and streamlined their sound, resulting in a tight, energetic blast of dance-rock. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
From
CD£13.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2010 | Polydor Records

It would have been hard to guess that the Courteeners had a sensitive side based on St. Jude, but they show little else on Falcon. Where their debut was rough and raw courtesy of quintessential Brit-pop producer Stephen Street, for this set of songs the band headed to Belgium to work with Ed Buller, who helped them slows things down and take them more seriously. If the Courteeners risked sounding like a caricature of mouthy Manchester bands before them such as Oasis on St. Jude, here they feel in danger of becoming a copy of the city’s more reflective bands, like Elbow. Perhaps the big attitude change on Falcon comes from a need for the band to prove that there’s more to their sound than breathless rock and sneering lyrics, and to a certain extent, they accomplish this. “The Opener” doesn’t just open up the album, it opens up the Courteeners’ sound into polished, epic rock complete with brass and strings (some of the clearest signals a band can send that its music is Serious). It also lets singer Liam Fray open up with some confessional lyrics about the strength of his love for his girl and his city, facing up to infidelities (“I’ve been having an affair with London and New York”) and seeking reassurance. It works because Fray’s voice is appealing and the song’s anthemic swell is hard to deny, but Falcon is almost painfully earnest and filled with too many songs that feel like they’d be a nice break from the action on a louder album. “The Rest of the World Has Gone Home” would be an ideal closing track, but it’s in the middle of Falcon; “Lullaby” and “Cameo Brooch” are tender, but they drag. The Courteeners are still fare better when they’re a little cocky, as on the Franz Ferdinand-like groove of “You Overdid It Doll” and “Scratch Your Name Upon My Lips,” or when they keep the energy up, like they do on “Good Times Are Calling.” It turns out that too much soul-baring is as bad as too many putdowns; maybe next time the band will find some balance between the extremes of this album and St. Jude. © Heather Phares /TiVo
From
CD£0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 17, 2015 | [PIAS] Cooperative

Alternative & Indie - Released October 28, 2016 | Ignition

Download not available
A decade into their career, Manchester quartet the Courteeners bring a little levity with their fifth LP, Mapping the Rendezvous. Combining sonic touchstones from throughout their catalog -- angular post-punk, neo-Brit-pop, and polished new wave -- they produced one of their strongest works, as addictive as anything on Anna and Concrete Love. Like contemporaries Kaiser Chiefs and Two Door Cinema Club, they've evolved from their indie rock early days, favoring melody and pop-leaning numbers that inspire more dancing than rocking out. Rendezvous is a lot of fun, especially on bouncy ditties like "Tip Toes," "The Dilettante," "Not for Tomorrow," "No One Will Ever Replace Us," and the Phoenix-lite "Modern Love." Highlights include the devilishly cool "Lucifer's Dreams," one of a handful of urgent dance-rock songs that recall the aforementioned Kaisers, and the sexy "Kitchen," a throwback that sounds like Robert Palmer fronting INXS (or simply a muscular version of the 1975). Falcon fans will appreciate slower moments like the Morrissey-esque "De la Salle" and "Most Important," a touching ode that combines the tribal drums of Yeah Yeah Yeahs' "Maps" with the Courteeners' own "Lullaby." A nod to their Brit-pop influences is found on the grand "Finest Hour," a slow-building track that ends with a fanfare worthy of Blur's "The Universal." Mapping the Rendezvous might not appease those fans still waiting for the return of St. Jude, but eight years after their debut, the Courteeners have grown up and streamlined their sound, resulting in a tight, energetic blast of dance-rock. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Polydor Records

The long-awaited debut by neo-Brit-pop quartet the Courteeners fits neatly into the continuum of big brash guitar bands from Manchester, with hints of the Smiths (including a typically fine production job by Stephen Street), the Stone Roses (occasional flirtations both with '60s-style jangle pop and psychedelia), and Oasis (frontman Liam Fray's big mouth and apparent lack of internal censor, both of which have already made him a popular interview subject for the U.K. music press) coloring these 12 songs. Now, Fray is not the equal of those bands as either a distinctive frontman or as an instantly memorable songwriter, but the best parts of St. Jude are at least superior to, say, Menswear or Cast. Tracks like the singles "What Took You So Long?" and "Not Nineteen Forever" fairly leap out of the gate, all jangly guitar lines and galloping rhythm sections, topped with Fray's endearingly yobbish vocals and unabashed sentimental lyrical streak, and the more measured material throws enough changeups to keep the album from getting tiring. Time will tell whether the Courteeners have more than one good album in them, but there is always room for this spirited take on British indie rock. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | Polydor Records

It would have been hard to guess that the Courteeners had a sensitive side based on St. Jude, but they show little else on Falcon. Where their debut was rough and raw courtesy of quintessential Brit-pop producer Stephen Street, for this set of songs the band headed to Belgium to work with Ed Buller, who helped them slows things down and take them more seriously. If the Courteeners risked sounding like a caricature of mouthy Manchester bands before them such as Oasis on St. Jude, here they feel in danger of becoming a copy of the city’s more reflective bands, like Elbow. Perhaps the big attitude change on Falcon comes from a need for the band to prove that there’s more to their sound than breathless rock and sneering lyrics, and to a certain extent, they accomplish this. “The Opener” doesn’t just open up the album, it opens up the Courteeners’ sound into polished, epic rock complete with brass and strings (some of the clearest signals a band can send that its music is Serious). It also lets singer Liam Fray open up with some confessional lyrics about the strength of his love for his girl and his city, facing up to infidelities (“I’ve been having an affair with London and New York”) and seeking reassurance. It works because Fray’s voice is appealing and the song’s anthemic swell is hard to deny, but Falcon is almost painfully earnest and filled with too many songs that feel like they’d be a nice break from the action on a louder album. “The Rest of the World Has Gone Home” would be an ideal closing track, but it’s in the middle of Falcon; “Lullaby” and “Cameo Brooch” are tender, but they drag. The Courteeners are still fare better when they’re a little cocky, as on the Franz Ferdinand-like groove of “You Overdid It Doll” and “Scratch Your Name Upon My Lips,” or when they keep the energy up, like they do on “Good Times Are Calling.” It turns out that too much soul-baring is as bad as too many putdowns; maybe next time the band will find some balance between the extremes of this album and St. Jude. © Heather Phares /TiVo
From
HI-RES£11.99
CD£8.49

Alternative & Indie - Released October 28, 2016 | Ignition

Hi-Res
A decade into their career, Manchester quartet the Courteeners bring a little levity with their fifth LP, Mapping the Rendezvous. Combining sonic touchstones from throughout their catalog -- angular post-punk, neo-Brit-pop, and polished new wave -- they produced one of their strongest works, as addictive as anything on Anna and Concrete Love. Like contemporaries Kaiser Chiefs and Two Door Cinema Club, they've evolved from their indie rock early days, favoring melody and pop-leaning numbers that inspire more dancing than rocking out. Rendezvous is a lot of fun, especially on bouncy ditties like "Tip Toes," "The Dilettante," "Not for Tomorrow," "No One Will Ever Replace Us," and the Phoenix-lite "Modern Love." Highlights include the devilishly cool "Lucifer's Dreams," one of a handful of urgent dance-rock songs that recall the aforementioned Kaisers, and the sexy "Kitchen," a throwback that sounds like Robert Palmer fronting INXS (or simply a muscular version of the 1975). Falcon fans will appreciate slower moments like the Morrissey-esque "De la Salle" and "Most Important," a touching ode that combines the tribal drums of Yeah Yeah Yeahs' "Maps" with the Courteeners' own "Lullaby." A nod to their Brit-pop influences is found on the grand "Finest Hour," a slow-building track that ends with a fanfare worthy of Blur's "The Universal." Mapping the Rendezvous might not appease those fans still waiting for the return of St. Jude, but eight years after their debut, the Courteeners have grown up and streamlined their sound, resulting in a tight, energetic blast of dance-rock. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
From
CD£1.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Polydor Records

From
CD£9.49

Alternative & Indie - Released August 18, 2014 | [PIAS] Cooperative

The Courteeners' fourth studio album, 2014's Concrete Love, is a sweeping, organically layered, '80s-influenced effort. Building upon the anthemic synth pop of their previous 2013 album, Anna, the Manchester outfit delve even deeper into a layered post-punk sound that finds them adding more guitars and even strings on some cuts. Featured here are such singles as the driving "How Good It Was" and the romantic "Summer." © Matt Collar /TiVo
From
CD£0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 12, 2016 | Ignition

From
CD£1.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Records

From
CD£1.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Polydor Records

From
CD£0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 28, 2017 | Ignition

From
CD£3.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2010 | Polydor Records

From
CD£3.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Polydor Records