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Alternative & Indie - Released March 26, 2021 | Transgressive

While Brooklyn duo the Antlers' sublime blend of chamber-pop arrangements and melodic indie songwriting is intense and impressive, it hasn't always been particularly uplifting. The band's 2009 breakthrough Hospice was built around Peter Silberman's beautifully ambient songs about illness, death, and suffering, and the lighter subject matter on subsequent records was still fairly heavy. Sixth album Green to Gold is the group's first new material since 2014's Familiars, and follows a time of uncertainty when Silberman was troubled by both a vocal cord lesion and auditory problems that compromised his hearing. Even with these health concerns and the life changes they brought on, Green to Gold is a turn away from the atmospheres of dread and anxiety that hovered around the Antlers' earlier work, with Silberman turning in some of his mellowest, most patient songs yet. His delicate falsetto vocals and the group's gift for understated song construction carry over from the past, but they arrive completely free of the painful associations that formerly defined the band. Songs like "Stubborn Man" and "Porchlight" are relaxed, almost playful tunes, rolling by like a soft summer afternoon. A bedding of gentle organ and floating electronic sounds supports the bright and hopeful melody of "Solstice," one of the more melodically straightforward songs on the album. There are hints of sunny melancholy here and there on Green to Gold, but the mood is never dire or eerie. The lonely guitar figures of "Just One Sec" add to the lamenting feeling of the song, but by the time the drums kick in, it takes on a more childlike melody, with any hints of unhappiness or regret falling away. The lengthy title track finds Silberman out for an early morning walk, taking in the peaceful silence of his neighborhood as lazy, slightly sad guitars drift in and out of the picture. It's a far cry from the end-of-life reflections and emotional wrangling of earlier albums, leaning instead into a soft contentment. On the whole, Green to Gold reshapes the Antlers' once somber and brooding chamber pop into something bright and smiling. The songs strip away the sharpness and volatility the band reveled in on earlier albums to reveal a pleasant glow that was all too often hidden in the shadows. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 23, 2009 | Frenchkiss Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 16, 2014 | Transgressive

Familiars, the fourth album from Brooklyn-based indie/chamber/electronic trio Antlers, comes as a glacially slow step in the slow-moving progress that marked both their death-themed 2009 breakthrough album Hospice and its more electronica-leaning 2011 follow-up, Burst Apart. The nine songs here are sprawling pocket symphonies, longer songs brimming over with the horn arrangements that were just hinted at on previous work, if a little lighter on airy keyboards and Boards of Canada-influenced dreaminess. Songwriter Pete Silberman has always had a gift for storytelling lyrics that tend more toward tragedy than redemption, and a thick, somber vibe carries throughout much of Familiars, beginning with the brass section-powered lope of "Palace." Interplay between bright but distant-sounding horn sections and soft, simmering instrumentation makes every song a lush, glowing affair, recorded with a somewhat detached production that never allows for any one element to come too much into focus. This comes through with the same pastoral melancholia as Talk Talk on songs like "Refuge," while tunes like "Doppelgänger" tend more toward an almost film noir jazziness. As with previous albums, Antlers are at their best when things in Silberman's songs are at their bleakest, and the rock-bottom angst of "Hotel" is easily one of Familiars' strongest, if its narrator's sentiments are troubled at best. The album's focus on horn arrangements and roomy, dreamlike production gives it a singular feel, one where listening through the entire album feels not unlike wading through a field of tall reeds as an inexplicably sad autumn day fades into twilight. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 28, 2011 | Transgressive

Considering the rave reviews of the Antlers’ 2009 album and all the arena tours that followed, it could be misconstrued that a title like Burst Apart would be about the trials and tribulations of blowing up. Actually, Peter Silberman’s second album is an album without a concept -- a bit of a relief after the deathbed theme that weighed down Hospice. For Burst Apart, Silberman puts his personal tragedy behind him and starts anew by burying himself in electronics to make a unique sort of wistful chamber pop for the digital age. Michael Lerner and multi-instrumentalist Darby Cicci return to flesh out the songs, but Boards of Canada and Air are more of a guiding force this time than the fuzz-folkish Neutral Milk Hotel influence heard on Hospice. As before, the atmospheric electronics of “Every Night My Teeth Are Falling Out” and “Parentheses” are comparable to latter-day Radiohead, but for most of Burst Apart, the Antlers sound like a glossy, adult contemporary version of Deerhunter. Silberman’s voice has strengthened and his silky falsetto leads the slick wash of echoey beats and spacy synths. In the best moments, “Putting the Dog to Sleep,” “French Exit,” and “Rolled Together” have slow-tumbling, watery melodies that shimmer and swell to big tidal-wave hooks. Hospice may have been organic and fragile, but Burst Apart is sleek and self-assured, and the new image suits Silberman and the Antlers well. © Jason Lymangrover /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 16, 2011 | Transgressive

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 17, 2021 | Transgressive

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Folk - Released January 1, 2006 | The Antlers

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 6, 2020 | Transgressive

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 13, 2021 | Transgressive

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 10, 2020 | Transgressive

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 23, 2012 | Transgressive

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 21, 2014 | Transgressive

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 5, 2014 | Transgressive

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 27, 2012 | Transgressive

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 23, 2011 | Transgressive