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Classical - Released January 6, 2017 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Mariss Jansons and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra have recorded the tone poems of Richard Strauss for BR Klassik since 2010, and they have already presented the popular Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche (Till Eulenspiegels Merry Pranks), Don Juan, and Ein Heldenleben (A Hero's Life), in impressive performances for the German label. This 2016 album offers two more Strauss favorites, the musical representation of a mountain hike, Eine Alpensinfonie (An Alpine Symphony), and the moving depiction of a man's last moments, Tod und Verklärung (Death and Transfiguration). These works reflect dramatically different sides of Strauss, where the virtuosic music and opulent orchestration of Eine Alpensinfonie suggest a robust extroversion, while the deathbed ruminations of Tod und Verklärung and its final vision of transcendence are more introspective. Jansons elicits powerful playing from the orchestra, and draws out resplendent sonorities that are thrilling for their brilliance and force. Yet Strauss' softer music may hold more expressive depth, particularly the tone painting of "Night" at the beginning of Ein Alpensinfonie, and the fragile, hesitant opening of Tod und Verklärung, which are among the subtlest and most affecting passages in all of Strauss' works. The sound of this standard CD is rich and vibrant, and practically every detail can be heard clearly. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 2, 2015 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
Daniel Harding is no newcomer to the music of Gustav Mahler, having recorded the Symphony No. 4 in G major with the Mahler Chamber Orchestra and Deryck Cooke's realization of the Symphony No. 10 in F sharp major with the Vienna Philharmonic. With that understood, one may question his choices in the Symphony No. 6 in A minor,"Tragic," as recorded live with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, because the interpretation as a whole seems rushed and a bit impatient, leaving an impression of superficial treatment and missed opportunities. One may take issue with the sequence of the inner movements; indeed, many contemporary conductors offer the Andante moderato and Scherzo ordering, as does Harding, following Mahler's performances, even though it's reversed in the first published score, which makes better sense as a tonal scheme. However, if that were the only problem, it could still be an acceptable reading, but Harding is in too much of a hurry, pushing the musicians too insistently, skimming over inner details of the score, and doing little with the atmospheric tone colors that, in other hands, make this symphony magical. While this performance is still listenable and suitable for study purposes, it's unlikely to be anyone's top choice, and this recording must contend with many great renditions of superior quality and musicianship. © TiVo
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Classical - Released June 7, 2011 | BR-Klassik

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording
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Classical - Released September 24, 2013 | BR-Klassik

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released August 4, 2017 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
Mariss Jansons' second recording of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor is in many ways an improvement on his first effort, a 2008 release with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra on its RCO Live label that had its share of flaws. This 2016 live performance with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra on BR Klassik is tighter and cleaner, with more accurate playing and more vivid sound, which is surprising because this standard CD offers richer and deeper sound than RCO Live's hybrid SACD. Jansons seems to have grown with this symphony, and his handling of the music is more confident and similar to other mainstream performances in feeling and overall pacing. Two problems that were noticeable in the earlier recording persist here: Jansons still uses rubato to an excessive degree, and his occasional humming along with the music is a bit of a distraction, so listeners who were bothered by these issues previously may be disappointed to find them here. However, the performance overall is solid, the climaxes are impressive, and the orchestra is at its best in the exuberant Finale, which is crisply played to emphasize the astonishing counterpoint. With the large number of recordings of the Fifth available, this recording faces considerable competition, though Jansons has demonstrated staying power with Mahler, and his fans will be happy to follow where he leads. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released June 3, 2016 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released April 1, 2016 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released January 6, 2017 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Bernard Haitink has had a long association with Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 3 in D minor, from his classic 1966 stereo recording with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra to his 2006 audiophile recording with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. This 2016 release on BR Klassik finds Haitink leading the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra in a stirring live performance that shows no diminishment of the conductor's interpretive powers, and compares quite well with his previous renditions. Joined by mezzo-soprano Gerhild Romberger, the Augsburger Domsingknaben, and the women of the Bavarian Radio Women's Choir, Haitink explores the symphony's extraordinary mix of musical styles and genres, and ties them all together in an exuberant reading that is compelling from beginning to end. Even though this is Mahler's longest symphony, at close to an hour and 40 minutes total, with a first movement that is more than a half-hour long, the performance is so engaging and joyful that time seems to fly by, especially as the mood brightens over the five remaining movements. The sound of this recording is first-rate for a standard CD and approaches the quality of multichannel with its precise details, clear separation of parts, and remarkable physical depth. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 6, 2015 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released September 20, 2019 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
If this 2019 release of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 1 in D major brings on feelings of déjà vu, it might be because Mariss Jansons has covered this ground before with his previous recordings with the Oslo Philharmonic on Simax and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra on RCO Live. Even so, Jansons' release on BR Klassik reflects his mature outlook on Mahler, and where his previous readings of the First may have been oriented primarily towards delivering a polished audiophile presentation, this live performance with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra delivers terrific sound quality and considerable musical depth. This symphony is extremely popular with audiences, and the wide availability of recordings may make it difficult to choose one over others, but this rendition is certainly a contender. Jansons plays the symphony as it was published in 1899, without including the rejected "Blumine" movement from the original form of the work as a tone poem, and even eschewing the symphony's persistent but unauthorized nickname, "Titan." The playing by the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra is world-class in its vivid colors, vital rhythms, and technical virtuosity, and the trajectory of the work is skillfully controlled by Jansons, who builds energy and excitement without indulging in unorthodox tempos, except for some hectic rushing at the end of the first movement. On the whole, this is a satisfying recording that holds its own rather well against the competition. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 1, 2019 | Orfeo

Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released February 1, 2011 | BR-Klassik

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Mariss Jansons' SACD releases on BR Klassik sometimes compete with his earlier recordings of the same music on other labels. His 2011 album of Johannes Brahms' Second and Third symphonies covers the same works that were released in 1999 on Simax, though the live performance by the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra has the advantage of DSD multichannel recording, where the older reading with the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra was a standard digital CD. Beyond the benefit of state-of-the-art reproduction, this is a respectable run-through of Brahms' middle symphonies, though devotees of these works may feel that Jansons doesn't rise to a high level in his interpretations, and the BRSO is not exactly inspired in its playing. That the performances are merely adequate is arguable, but nothing special emerges that compels the listener to stick with the symphonies from beginning to end, either for emotional insights or for brilliant execution. Even the orchestral sound is nothing special, despite the audiophile presentation. All the notes can be heard, and most of the rhythms and tempos are together, with only a few spots of imprecision, so the music is good for following along with a score. But in a market that is full of great, even legendary, performances of Brahms' symphonies -- many as sets of all four masterpieces -- this pairing seems only average and not much of an enticement to purchase. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 4, 2016 | BR-Klassik

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Yannick Nézet-Séguin's performances of the symphonies of Gustav Mahler have yielded fascinating results, though his progress in recording them has been sporadic, so this 2016 release of the Symphony No. 1 in D major with the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks is a welcome addition to his discography. In this live performance of the published score, Nézet-Séguin makes no apologies for not including the rejected Blumine movement or, for that matter, not attempting to revert the symphony to its earlier state as the symphonic poem Der Titan, as several conductors have. To the contrary, Nézet-Séguin lets the four-movement version stand on its own without recourse to historical revisionism, and the trajectory of the work is almost ideally realized without the extraneous Blumine. Indeed, the energy generated in the first movement spills over into the Scherzo, and the slow third movement comes as a welcome relief before the volatile Finale. Beyond preserving the feeling of momentum and balanced proportions, Nézet-Séguin also draws out the wonderful colors in Mahler's masterful orchestration that make this symphony a delight, and every detail comes across vividly in the recording. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
Taped in 1957 and 1959, these recordings of Schubert's Symphonies No. 5 and No. 9 by Eugen Jochum conducting the euphonically named Bayerischen Rundfunks Sinfonie-orchester still sound brand-spanking new, as clear, as clean, as contemporary as the best recording from any era can sound. And the performances are even better. Jochum's Schubert is bigger and brawnier than many more later Schubert performances, but it's still light on its feet and fairly fleet by the standards of the late '50s. Part of that's because Jochum skips the repeats in the Ninth bringing it in at 50 minutes, 10 less than contemporary Schubert performances. And part of that's because Jochum's tempos are quicker and his rhythms are more sprung than performances by his contemporaries Karajan and Beecham. Listeners familiar with Jochum's contemporaneous Bruckner recordings will recognize the weight and gravity of his Ninth, but most listeners familiar with only Jochum's later Beethoven and Brahms recordings will be surprised by the lyricism of his Fifth. The Bavarians play with sweetness in their strings, strength in their brass, and color in their winds, and their blend and balance are wonderfully deft. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1975 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released February 3, 2017 | NEOS Music

Distinctions Gramophone Award
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Classical - Released November 6, 2015 | BR-Klassik

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released November 4, 2014 | Oehms Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Diapason d'or