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Pop - Released January 1, 2015 | Rhino

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Rock - Released September 15, 2003 | Parlophone UK

Starsailor's sophomore effort, Silence Is Easy, was hotly anticipated largely upon the announcement that the melodic and earnest quartet from Chorley, England, would be working with legendary producer Phil Spector. It also didn't hurt that Starsailor's debut release, Love Is Here, was generally received upon its release as one of the best British rock albums of 2002. Built around the songwriting and lead vocals of James Walsh, the band fit nicely alongside similarly minded mellow Brits Doves and Coldplay. Mixing alternative rock aesthetics with a melodic pop sensibility, Silence Is Easy finds the band in pretty much the same place as before with slightly better songwriting, a more mature vocal performance by Walsh, and tastefully grandiose production. It's also clear from the cover art alone -- a pristinely epic photo of the band by water that veritably screams Heaven Up Here -- that Echo & the Bunnymen is, along with Spector, a main influence here. It makes sense: the Bunnymen's use of strings, horns, and chugging beats always seemed like a direct outgrowth of Spector's Brill Building "Wall of Sound" aesthetic. The bookend-like influence on Starsailor feels serendipitous. Even Walsh's delivery, which bordered on the relentlessly nasal on Love Is Here, here reveals the flush of Ian McCulloch's bluesy baritone. The 11 tracks here, including the two Spector-produced numbers, are heartfelt, melodic rockers with some string backgrounds that fit well into the overall aesthetic of cinematic pop romanticism. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 8, 2001 | Parlophone UK

Starsailor was already a critic's darling in the band's native England during mid-2001, and the group's painfully melodic debut, Love Is Here, poised the band to rise in the shadows of Doves, Coldplay, and Travis. Starsailor, however, isn't as polished as its counterparts, but that's not to say Love Is Here isn't a beautiful piece of work. It's less lilting than Coldplay's Parachutes, and frontman James Walsh's aching vocals shape his angularity as a singer/songwriter. Starsailor is a young band, and Love Is Here illustrates the group's sharp intellect inside basic acoustics. Singles such as the passionately violent "Alcoholic" and melancholic dark hues of "Fever" touch upon Starsailor's own pop stylings. The band isn't typically jaunty, for the members of Starsailor are a bit cynical. Lyrics reflect battles with self-discovery, independence, and being lovelorn; however, they're matches of a survivor. "Talk Her Down," one of the album's most gnarling tracks, bounces with light psychedelic patterns, and "Good Souls" is probably Starsailor's closest rock & roll moment. The live soundscape found on Love Is Here sets up the simplistic beauty of this new band. They didn't go for a grand bombast of crashing guitars and angst-ridden stories similar to Oasis and Manic Street Preachers. They go for something more positive as well -- each song soars with intricate musicianship and melodic lushness. Wigan native Richard Ashcroft would be pleased. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 27, 2017 | Cooking Vinyl

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Rock - Released October 7, 2003 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released September 1, 2017 | Cooking Vinyl

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Pop - Released March 9, 2009 | Parlophone UK

After experimenting with Phil Spector-produced cinematic pop on Silence Is Easy and a harder-edged U.S.-influenced rock sound on On the Outside, Lancashire four-piece Starsailor go back to basics on their fourth studio album, All the Plans. Teaming up for the second time with Steve Osborne, producer of their debut album Love Is Here, their first release since signing to Virgin Records, harks back to their trademark heart-tugging brand of acoustic indie rock, which initially earned them comparisons to the likes of Coldplay, Travis, and the Verve. Opening track "Tell Me It's Not Over," a melancholic tale of infidelity soundtracked by a wall of anthemic piano chords, chiming guitars, and James Walsh's tender, plaintive tones, might not exactly break new ground, but it's possibly their best single since 2001's heart-achingly raw "Alcoholic." Elsewhere, Rolling Stone Ronnie Wood pops up on the title track, a vintage slice of rock & roll which recalls the attitude-laden swagger of early Oasis; "Boy in Waiting" is a stripped-down melodic ballad featuring a lilting piano hook reminiscent of Bruce Hornsby's "That's the Way It Is," while "Neon Sky" is an emotionally fraught fusion of atmospheric organs, swelling choirs, and an epic falsetto-led chorus, which Walsh claims is the best song he's ever written. But despite its regressive nature, All the Plans still offers up a few surprises. The Spaghetti Western feel of "The Thames" echoes the Ennio Morricone-inspired output of the Last Shadow Puppets, a sound they also revisit on the twanging, guitar-led "Stars and Stripes," while the album's closer, "Safe at Home," is a brooding, sparsely produced slice of country-blues which suggests the band have been listening to late Johnny Cash as much as their more obvious inspirations, Tim Buckley, Radiohead, and Van Morrison. Starsailor have never been as strong lyrically as they have musically, and All the Plans is no exception with banal lines like "is love just a big mistake?/just a risk that we all take" overshadowing their rather impressive handling of more difficult themes like suicide and imperialist America, while Walsh's trembling delivery still occasionally sounds like he's performing as a Jeff Buckley tribute artist. But while their early noughties contemporaries like Idlewild, JJ72, and Turin Brakes have either fallen by the wayside or retreated back into obscurity, All the Plans is a mature and welcome return to form which shows that Starsailor are stronger than ever. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 17, 2005 | Parlophone UK

Starsailor's third studio album On the Outside features more of the British rock group's big, melodic, world-weary rock. This is alt-rock as conceived by bands like U2 and Echo & the Bunnymen. It's heavy on pathos and hooky choruses, and generally follows the serious artist credo of the more organ the better. Lead singer James Walsh's deadpan half-yodel is a bit of an acquired taste, but shouldn't come as a shock to anybody reared on a steady diet of Radiohead and Verve. It also meshes nicely with the big print imperatives Walsh favors for lyrics like, "Faith, Hope, Love; Be enough," "I got enough respite to keep on tryin'" and "Do you see what I see -- a plastic society?." While the album is impeccably crafted, the songs here lean toward the homogeneous and may take a few spins before such gems as "In My Blood," "Keep Us Together," and "Get Out While You Can" reveal themselves. Fittingly, for listeners who do not alienate themselves on the first spin, On the Outside holds much to offer. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 9, 2009 | Parlophone UK

After experimenting with Phil Spector-produced cinematic pop on Silence Is Easy and a harder-edged U.S.-influenced rock sound on On the Outside, Lancashire four-piece Starsailor go back to basics on their fourth studio album, All the Plans. Teaming up for the second time with Steve Osborne, producer of their debut album Love Is Here, their first release since signing to Virgin Records, harks back to their trademark heart-tugging brand of acoustic indie rock, which initially earned them comparisons to the likes of Coldplay, Travis, and the Verve. Opening track "Tell Me It's Not Over," a melancholic tale of infidelity soundtracked by a wall of anthemic piano chords, chiming guitars, and James Walsh's tender, plaintive tones, might not exactly break new ground, but it's possibly their best single since 2001's heart-achingly raw "Alcoholic." Elsewhere, Rolling Stone Ronnie Wood pops up on the title track, a vintage slice of rock & roll which recalls the attitude-laden swagger of early Oasis; "Boy in Waiting" is a stripped-down melodic ballad featuring a lilting piano hook reminiscent of Bruce Hornsby's "That's the Way It Is," while "Neon Sky" is an emotionally fraught fusion of atmospheric organs, swelling choirs, and an epic falsetto-led chorus, which Walsh claims is the best song he's ever written. But despite its regressive nature, All the Plans still offers up a few surprises. The Spaghetti Western feel of "The Thames" echoes the Ennio Morricone-inspired output of the Last Shadow Puppets, a sound they also revisit on the twanging, guitar-led "Stars and Stripes," while the album's closer, "Safe at Home," is a brooding, sparsely produced slice of country-blues which suggests the band have been listening to late Johnny Cash as much as their more obvious inspirations, Tim Buckley, Radiohead, and Van Morrison. Starsailor have never been as strong lyrically as they have musically, and All the Plans is no exception with banal lines like "is love just a big mistake?/just a risk that we all take" overshadowing their rather impressive handling of more difficult themes like suicide and imperialist America, while Walsh's trembling delivery still occasionally sounds like he's performing as a Jeff Buckley tribute artist. But while their early noughties contemporaries like Idlewild, JJ72, and Turin Brakes have either fallen by the wayside or retreated back into obscurity, All the Plans is a mature and welcome return to form which shows that Starsailor are stronger than ever. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 28, 2003 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released March 19, 2004 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 27, 2009 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released August 20, 2004 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released August 20, 2004 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released August 20, 2004 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released August 20, 2004 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released August 20, 2004 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released August 20, 2004 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released August 20, 2004 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released August 20, 2004 | Parlophone UK