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Jazz - Released September 2, 2010 | Fresh Sound Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Jazzman
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2005 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1967 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
One of Stan Getz's all-time greatest albums, Sweet Rain was his first major artistic coup after he closed the book on his bossa nova period, featuring an adventurous young group that pushed him to new heights in his solo statements. Pianist Chick Corea, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Grady Tate were all schooled in '60s concepts of rhythm-section freedom, and their continually stimulating interplay helps open things up for Getz to embark on some long, soulful explorations (four of the five tracks are over seven minutes). The neat trick of Sweet Rain is that the advanced rhythm section work remains balanced with Getz's customary loveliness and lyricism. Indeed, Getz plays with a searching, aching passion throughout the date, which undoubtedly helped Mike Gibbs' title track become a standard after Getz's tender treatment here. Technical perfectionists will hear a few squeaks on the LP's second half (Getz's drug problems were reputedly affecting his articulation somewhat), but Getz was such a master of mood, tone, and pacing that his ideas and emotions are communicated far too clearly to nit-pick. Corea's spare, understated work leaves plenty of room for Getz's lines and the busily shifting rhythms of the bass and drums, heard to best effect in Corea's challenging opener "Litha." Aside from that and the title track, the repertoire features another Corea original ("Windows"), the typically lovely Jobim tune "O Grande Amor," and Dizzy Gillespie's Latin-flavored "Con Alma." The quartet's level of musicianship remains high on every selection, and the marvelously consistent atmosphere the album evokes places it among Getz's very best. A surefire classic. ~ Steve Huey
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1958 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released June 14, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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1961 was the year before Stan Getz's and Charlie Byrd's smash Jazz Samba recording appeared. The album's success netted an influence so imposing it impacted the direction of the saxophonist's creative life. Before this, there was scant recorded evidence to document where Getz was headed after he returned to America from a three-year sojourn in Copenhagen. Getz recorded Focus with Eddie Sauter in the summer of 1961, and in the fall, Stan Getz & Bob Brookmeyer: Recorded Fall 1961 was recorded with the other members of his "Boston Band": drummer Roy Haynes, pianist Steve Kuhn, and bassist John Neves. This group was captured at the Village Gate in November. Earlier that year, Getz formed a quartet with bassist Scott LaFaro that included Kuhn and drummer Pete LaRoca. By early March, Haynes (after the bassist's lobbying) was in the drum chair. On July 3, the quartet performed to a standing ovation at Newport; three days later, LaFaro was killed in an accident. Two weeks later, the saxist engaged Neves. Simultaneously, John Coltrane replaced Getz at the top of the tenor polls in 1961. His new directions -- monitored by Getz in Europe -- influenced the more muscular direction employed here that would evaporate on Focus and Jazz Samba. In addition, Kuhn had worked with 'Trane before McCoy Tyner. In the vaults for 58 years, these tapes contain every note of the quartet's scorching performance in New York. Getz's rich tone, fleet soloing, and driving rhythmic pursuit are displayed early in a storming, bop-pish read of Cole Porter's "It's Alright with Me." Getz and company also display their muscle in semi-modernist, back to back reads of Coltrane's "Impressions" (that Kuhn had played in the 'Trane band) and Sonny Rollins' "Airegin." But the swing isn't missing: it is amply displayed during the first set in buoyant, good-natured takes of Van Heusen's and Burke's "Like Someone in Love," and Gigi Gryce's "Wildwood." A flaming read of Dizzy Gillespie's "Woody 'n You" features stunning work from Kuhn, followed by the ten-and-a-half-minute jam "Blues." The second set commences with the ballad "Where Do You Go?" followed by "Yesterday's Gardenias," a lithe midtempo swinger with some of Getz's most lyrical improvising in the concert. The standards continue with "Stella by Starlight" as Haynes double times the band with a cut-time shuffle, as well as a silky version of the ballad highlight "Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most," which is the most soulful recorded performance by the saxophonist. The show closes with a juxtaposition of early modernism -- Thelonious Monk's "52nd St. Theme" anthem -- and a nod to Getz's greatest influence Lester Young with a blues-drenched "Jumping with Symphony Sid." The sound on Getz at the Gate is warm, full, and crystalline, and the package contains a fine Bob Blumenthal liner essay. This concert is a major find: It shines a bright light on a historically obscure, musically adventurous period in Getz's career, one that represents the road not taken. ~ Thom Jurek
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Verve

The Bossa Nova Albums collects five of the pinnacle recordings from the best American foray into Brazilian jazz, which began in 1962 with the Stan Getz/Charlie Byrd collaboration Jazz Samba and peaked one year later with the fourth album in the ad hoc series, Getz/Gilberto (which would have been better titled Getz/Gilberto/Jobim). Getz/Gilberto's high place in musical history would be assured even without the immense success of Astrud Gilberto's vocalizing on "The Girl from Ipanema." The album was pivotal in repositioning American musical consciousness to include the soft textures and nimble playing of João Gilberto's guitar and Antonio Carlos Jobim's piano, and it influenced the material that a wide range of singers included on their albums. Admirably, Getz only continued to use his position to introduce great Brazilian musicians to the record-buying public; he recorded Jazz Samba Encore! with Luiz Bonfá, a better guitarist than even Gilberto, and Stan Getz with Guest Artist Laurindo Almeida (the latter recorded only two days after Getz/Gilberto was finished). Beyond the uniformly excellent music, this specific set does nothing more than repackage five separately available CDs, all of which featured up-to-date mastering but not the bonus tracks of previous editions; there isn't even a booklet or a single liner note beyond what was on the original LPs. For the full story and additional material, including tracks from the piecemeal Getz/Gilberto #2, Getz's The Bossa Nova Years box set is still the one to beat. ~ John Bush
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Jazz - Released October 17, 1989 | Verve

This five-LP box set (which has been reissued on CD) contains nearly all of Stan Getz's classic bossa nova sessions, five wonderful yet diverse LPs (Jazz Samba, Big Band Bossa Nova, Jazz Samba Encore, Stan Getz/Laurindo Almedia, and Getz/Gilberto). The cool-toned tenor is heard on his groundbreaking collaboration with guitarist Charlie Byrd (which resulted in the best-selling "Desafinado"), is showcased with a big band arranged by Gary McFarland (introducing "No More Blues" and "One Note Samba"), stars in recordings with guitarists Laurindo Almeida and Luiz Bonfa, and is heard at the famous meeting with composer/pianist Antonio Carlos Jobim, guitarist João Gilberto, and singer Astrud Gilberto, which resulted in the major hit "The Girl From Ipanema." This essential set finishes off with three previously unissued performances from a 1964 Carnegie Hall Concert, concluding with a remake of "The Girl From Ipanema." These recordings stand as proof that it is possible for good music to sell. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Verve

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Bebop - Released October 10, 2007 | BDMUSIC

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1961 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released September 25, 2003 | BDMUSIC

Booklet
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | A&M Jazz

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1972 | Verve Reissues

Featuring compositions and arrangements by film composer and jazz buff Michel Legrand, Stan Getz's Communications '72 is one in a long line of strings-and-voices albums the tenor saxophonist recorded. Starting with a Gunther Schuller-arranged session from 1955, Getz produced some impressive work in this context, with the incredible Eddie Sauter collaboration Focus standing out in particular. And even in the midst of some not-so-incredible backing on a few sets, Getz always comes up with impeccable solo statements. For his part, Legrand strikes an expert balance here among jazz combo, strings, and chorus, but the frenetic Swingle Singers-style choral parts don't always come off. While overpowering Getz on the otherwise lovely "Redemption," the vocal interjections sound too overarching in their mix of avant-garde and straightforward phrasing on "Outhouse Blues" and "Bonjour Tristesse." Legrand succeeds elsewhere, though, especially on "Nursery Rhymes for All God's Children" and "Flight." And whether the frequent choral parts on Communications '72 become annoying really comes down to preference, since most of them are tastefully, even provocatively written. As usual, Getz makes it all shine with his golden tone and beguiling solo lines. A good title, but primarily recommended for Getz fans. [The 2003 Japanese reissue of the album does not contain extra material, but it does have dramatically improved sound, being remastered at 24 bit, and features an exact, mini replica of the original cover in heavy gatefold cardboard with a rice paper sleeve to house the disc.] ~ Stephen Cook