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Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | Polydor Records

The banal title fronts a disappointing debut from Sophie Ellis-Bextor, fusing Human League synth with beats and cinematic strings ("Take Me Home"/"Murder on the Dancefloor"). Nothing, though, really comes close to matching the shimmering highlight, "Murder on the Dancefloor," which guests bass genius Guy Pratt. "Final Move" is a more subdued version with similar kaleidoscope synth. Another notable is Ellis-Bextor's English accent, particularly on "By Chance." © Kelvin Hayes /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 13, 2020 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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Pop - Released March 15, 2019 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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This new album has created quite a buzz. It covers some of Sophie Ellis-Bextor’s most iconic pieces for symphony orchestra, featuring her three greatest hits Groovejet (by Italian DJ Spiller in 2000), Take Me Home (a cover of a Cher song from 2001) and, of course, the unmistakable Murder on the Dancefloor (2001), whose delightful flamenco rhythms are an added bonus for the listener on top of the incredible string ensemble. The album then unfurls smoothly track after track, providing a rather moving flashback in the long career of the English singer with a porcelain complexion. It captures the depth of Young Blood (whose charming hook in the intro on piano is replaced by strings and clarinet), the cinematic lyricism of Heartbreak and also includes a rendition of her waltz tune Love Is a Camera. Admittedly, the orchestra plays in a very classical rather than daring way, but the huge contrast between some of these versions and the original dance pieces certainly makes for an intriguing listen. As an added bonus, Take Me Home and Murder on the Dancefloor have each been revamped in a combination of styles as the sound of the orchestra is mixed with a disco rhythm, and staying within the disco theme, The Song Diaries also includes the singer’s recent track Love Is You (2018) which brings The Love Boat to mind. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz 
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Pop - Released January 20, 2014 | EBGB's

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Pop - Released October 30, 2020 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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Pop - Released September 2, 2016 | EBGB's

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Rock - Released June 12, 2011 | EBGB's

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Pop - Released September 18, 2020 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | Polydor Records

The banal title fronts a disappointing debut from Sophie Ellis-Bextor, fusing Human League synth with beats and cinematic strings ("Take Me Home"/"Murder on the Dancefloor"). Nothing, though, really comes close to matching the shimmering highlight, "Murder on the Dancefloor," which guests bass genius Guy Pratt. "Final Move" is a more subdued version with similar kaleidoscope synth. Another notable is Ellis-Bextor's English accent, particularly on "By Chance." © Kelvin Hayes /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 28, 2019 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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Pop - Released June 12, 2011 | EBGB's

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Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Sophie Ellis-Bextor's second album lacks anything nearly as distinctive as her early singles "Murder on the Dancefloor" and "Groovejet (If This Ain't Love)," but it's still a solid, perfectly respectable collection of contemporary dance-pop. Of course, "respectable" doesn't necessarily count for much in pop terms, although Ellis-Bextor has mastered a knack for exuding sophistication without being off-putting and stuffy -- she's so posh (viz. her unmistakable accent) that the slickness of the production complements her personality rather than diluting it. Still, the songs have to be there, and the songs on Shoot from the Hip rarely rise above the merely pleasant, the best bets there being the smooth disco single "Mixed-Up World" and the chipper "I Won't Change You," whose groove is reminiscent of Kylie Minogue's far-superior "Love at First Sight." Production-wise, there's enough variety to keep the album from sagging, particularly as things turn slightly darker and moodier towards the latter half with the spiky "You Get Yours" and the odd, haunted "The Walls Keep Saying Your Name." The understated ballad "I Am Not Good at Not Getting What I Want," co-written with Bernard Butler, rounds things out nicely. [Some editions included a cover of Olivia Newton-John's "Let's Get Physical" as a hidden bonus track.] © K. Ross Hoffman /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 3, 2014 | EBGB's

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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Records

A welcome return from one of the most sophisticated and distinctive voices in British dance-pop, Trip The Light Fantastic is easily Sophie Ellis-Bextor's most dynamic album to date. Markedly more consistent than its enjoyable-but-spotty predecessors, but also -- more importantly -- far more gutsy, varied and vital, its many strong points are the most exciting of her career. It had been four years since her previous album -- a considerable span in pop terms -- but Ellis-Bextor's music has always hearkened to smartly classicist, new wave-informed synth-disco, even in the days when the Pet Shop Boys were practically the sole remaining practitioners of the style, so it didn't require much alteration for her to sound right in step with eighties-resuscitation that was in full swing by 2007. Even so, she sounds dramatically reinvigorated here, with a notable infusion of rock guitars and often a forceful, even menacing, electro edge to the productions, both evident right out the gate in the strident, barnstorming first single "Catch You." The highlights follow fast and furious: the immaculate disco glide of "Me and My Imagination" (whose canny lyrics advise an overeager suitor to play harder to get), the robotic, strobing "New York City Lights," the Xenomania-esque, Emma Goldman-quoting stomp of "If I Can't Dance" (the actual Xenomania contribution, "If You Go," is nearly as good), and the lovely pop ballad "Today the Sun's on Us," Ellis-Bextor's entrant in the late-2000s "Time After Time"-homage sweepstakes. Amazingly, despite that practically flawless opening sequence, the latter half of the album is nearly as strong, boasting the bouncy, fun-loving pop of "Love Is Here" and the twitchy electro of "China Heart," while the brashly optimistic disco-schmaltz apotheosis "Only One" stands as the album's most triumphantly over the top, life-affirming moment. In a banner year for British, female-fronted electronic chart pop, which saw excellent albums by Sugababes, Girls Aloud, Róisín Murphy, Siobhan Donaghy, Tracey Thorn, and Kylie Minogue, among others, Ellis-Bextor more than held her own with a classy, romantic, and, above all, tremendously enjoyable record that stands as a shining example of the state of the art. © K. Ross Hoffman /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 11, 2018 | Cooking Vinyl

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Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | Polydor Records

Sophie Ellis-Bextor's second album lacks anything nearly as distinctive as her early singles "Murder on the Dancefloor" and "Groovejet (If This Ain't Love)," but it's still a solid, perfectly respectable collection of contemporary dance-pop. Of course, "respectable" doesn't necessarily count for much in pop terms, although Ellis-Bextor has mastered a knack for exuding sophistication without being off-putting and stuffy -- she's so posh (viz. her unmistakable accent) that the slickness of the production complements her personality rather than diluting it. Still, the songs have to be there, and the songs on Shoot from the Hip rarely rise above the merely pleasant, the best bets there being the smooth disco single "Mixed-Up World" and the chipper "I Won't Change You," whose groove is reminiscent of Kylie Minogue's far-superior "Love at First Sight." Production-wise, there's enough variety to keep the album from sagging, particularly as things turn slightly darker and moodier towards the latter half with the spiky "You Get Yours" and the odd, haunted "The Walls Keep Saying Your Name." The understated ballad "I Am Not Good at Not Getting What I Want," co-written with Bernard Butler, rounds things out nicely. [Some editions included a cover of Olivia Newton-John's "Let's Get Physical" as a hidden bonus track.] © K. Ross Hoffman /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Records

A welcome return from one of the most sophisticated and distinctive voices in British dance-pop, Trip The Light Fantastic is easily Sophie Ellis-Bextor's most dynamic album to date. Markedly more consistent than its enjoyable-but-spotty predecessors, but also -- more importantly -- far more gutsy, varied and vital, its many strong points are the most exciting of her career. It had been four years since her previous album -- a considerable span in pop terms -- but Ellis-Bextor's music has always hearkened to smartly classicist, new wave-informed synth-disco, even in the days when the Pet Shop Boys were practically the sole remaining practitioners of the style, so it didn't require much alteration for her to sound right in step with eighties-resuscitation that was in full swing by 2007. Even so, she sounds dramatically reinvigorated here, with a notable infusion of rock guitars and often a forceful, even menacing, electro edge to the productions, both evident right out the gate in the strident, barnstorming first single "Catch You." The highlights follow fast and furious: the immaculate disco glide of "Me and My Imagination" (whose canny lyrics advise an overeager suitor to play harder to get), the robotic, strobing "New York City Lights," the Xenomania-esque, Emma Goldman-quoting stomp of "If I Can't Dance" (the actual Xenomania contribution, "If You Go," is nearly as good), and the lovely pop ballad "Today the Sun's on Us," Ellis-Bextor's entrant in the late-2000s "Time After Time"-homage sweepstakes. Amazingly, despite that practically flawless opening sequence, the latter half of the album is nearly as strong, boasting the bouncy, fun-loving pop of "Love Is Here" and the twitchy electro of "China Heart," while the brashly optimistic disco-schmaltz apotheosis "Only One" stands as the album's most triumphantly over the top, life-affirming moment. In a banner year for British, female-fronted electronic chart pop, which saw excellent albums by Sugababes, Girls Aloud, Róisín Murphy, Siobhan Donaghy, Tracey Thorn, and Kylie Minogue, among others, Ellis-Bextor more than held her own with a classy, romantic, and, above all, tremendously enjoyable record that stands as a shining example of the state of the art. © K. Ross Hoffman /TiVo
CD£11.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Records

A welcome return from one of the most sophisticated and distinctive voices in British dance-pop, Trip The Light Fantastic is easily Sophie Ellis-Bextor's most dynamic album to date. Markedly more consistent than its enjoyable-but-spotty predecessors, but also -- more importantly -- far more gutsy, varied and vital, its many strong points are the most exciting of her career. It had been four years since her previous album -- a considerable span in pop terms -- but Ellis-Bextor's music has always hearkened to smartly classicist, new wave-informed synth-disco, even in the days when the Pet Shop Boys were practically the sole remaining practitioners of the style, so it didn't require much alteration for her to sound right in step with eighties-resuscitation that was in full swing by 2007. Even so, she sounds dramatically reinvigorated here, with a notable infusion of rock guitars and often a forceful, even menacing, electro edge to the productions, both evident right out the gate in the strident, barnstorming first single "Catch You." The highlights follow fast and furious: the immaculate disco glide of "Me and My Imagination" (whose canny lyrics advise an overeager suitor to play harder to get), the robotic, strobing "New York City Lights," the Xenomania-esque, Emma Goldman-quoting stomp of "If I Can't Dance" (the actual Xenomania contribution, "If You Go," is nearly as good), and the lovely pop ballad "Today the Sun's on Us," Ellis-Bextor's entrant in the late-2000s "Time After Time"-homage sweepstakes. Amazingly, despite that practically flawless opening sequence, the latter half of the album is nearly as strong, boasting the bouncy, fun-loving pop of "Love Is Here" and the twitchy electro of "China Heart," while the brashly optimistic disco-schmaltz apotheosis "Only One" stands as the album's most triumphantly over the top, life-affirming moment. In a banner year for British, female-fronted electronic chart pop, which saw excellent albums by Sugababes, Girls Aloud, Róisín Murphy, Siobhan Donaghy, Tracey Thorn, and Kylie Minogue, among others, Ellis-Bextor more than held her own with a classy, romantic, and, above all, tremendously enjoyable record that stands as a shining example of the state of the art. © K. Ross Hoffman /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 7, 2018 | Cooking Vinyl

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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Records

A welcome return from one of the most sophisticated and distinctive voices in British dance-pop, Trip The Light Fantastic is easily Sophie Ellis-Bextor's most dynamic album to date. Markedly more consistent than its enjoyable-but-spotty predecessors, but also -- more importantly -- far more gutsy, varied and vital, its many strong points are the most exciting of her career. It had been four years since her previous album -- a considerable span in pop terms -- but Ellis-Bextor's music has always hearkened to smartly classicist, new wave-informed synth-disco, even in the days when the Pet Shop Boys were practically the sole remaining practitioners of the style, so it didn't require much alteration for her to sound right in step with eighties-resuscitation that was in full swing by 2007. Even so, she sounds dramatically reinvigorated here, with a notable infusion of rock guitars and often a forceful, even menacing, electro edge to the productions, both evident right out the gate in the strident, barnstorming first single "Catch You." The highlights follow fast and furious: the immaculate disco glide of "Me and My Imagination" (whose canny lyrics advise an overeager suitor to play harder to get), the robotic, strobing "New York City Lights," the Xenomania-esque, Emma Goldman-quoting stomp of "If I Can't Dance" (the actual Xenomania contribution, "If You Go," is nearly as good), and the lovely pop ballad "Today the Sun's on Us," Ellis-Bextor's entrant in the late-2000s "Time After Time"-homage sweepstakes. Amazingly, despite that practically flawless opening sequence, the latter half of the album is nearly as strong, boasting the bouncy, fun-loving pop of "Love Is Here" and the twitchy electro of "China Heart," while the brashly optimistic disco-schmaltz apotheosis "Only One" stands as the album's most triumphantly over the top, life-affirming moment. In a banner year for British, female-fronted electronic chart pop, which saw excellent albums by Sugababes, Girls Aloud, Róisín Murphy, Siobhan Donaghy, Tracey Thorn, and Kylie Minogue, among others, Ellis-Bextor more than held her own with a classy, romantic, and, above all, tremendously enjoyable record that stands as a shining example of the state of the art. © K. Ross Hoffman /TiVo