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Soul - Released September 30, 2016 | Saint Records - Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Solange Knowles started writing her third album in New Iberia, Louisiana, a town where her maternal grandparents lived until a Molotov cocktail was thrown into their home. That setting helps explain how A Seat at the Table turned out drastically different from Knowles' previous output. There's no revisitation of beachy retro soul-pop and new wave akin to "Sandcastle Disco" or "Losing You." Nothing has the humor of "Some Things Never Seem to Fucking Work" or the bluntness of "Fuck the Industry." There certainly aren't any love songs in the traditional sense. Instead, surrounded by a collaborative throng that includes Raphael Saadiq, Dave Longstreth, and Adam Bainbridge, Knowles composed and produced alleviating pro-black reflections of frustration and anger. They regard persistent dehumanizing burdens dealt to her and other persons of color in a country where many are hostile to the phrase "Black Lives Matter" and the equality-seeking organization of the same name. Remarkably, tender elegance is the mode for much of the album's duration, as heard in the exquisitely unguarded "Cranes in the Sky" and dimly lit left-of-center pop-R&B hybrids "Don't You Wait" and "Don't Wish Me Well." Those songs crave release and reject character assassination and stasis while hinting at inevitable fallout. Their restrained ornamentation and moderate tempos are perfectly suited for Knowles, an undervalued vocalist who never aims to bring the house down yet fills each note with purposeful emotion. When the rhythms bounce and the melodies brighten, as they do during a short second-half stretch, the material remains rooted in profound grief and mystified irritation. In "Borderline," a chugging machine beat and a lilting piano line form the backdrop of a scene where Knowles and her partner tune out the world for the sake of their sanity. Then, after Nia Andrews and Kelly Rowland's half minute of proud harmonic affirmation, along comes "Junie," a squiggling jam on which André 3000 makes like the track's namesake (Ohio Players and Parliament legend Junie Morrison), where Knowles delivers a sharp metaphorical smackdown of a cultural interloper like it's merely an improvised postscript. All of the guests, from Lil Wayne to Kelela, make necessary appearances. The same goes for Knowles' parents and Master P, who are present in the form of short interludes in which they discuss segregation, self-reliance, cultural theft, and black pride. These segues shrewdly fasten a cathartic yet poised album, one that weighs a ton and levitates. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Soul - Released March 1, 2019 | Saint Records - Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
What is she doing when she gets home? Is she eating potato chips? Is she taking a bath? Is she paying her bills? Solange never answers any of these questions. The home of “When I Get Home” is much more her native Texas than her beloved New Orleans apartment. When I Get Home is a love letter to Houston. As with each of her previous records, Beyoncé’s sister takes on a mellow tone, melancholic even, which draws more comparisons to Erykah Badu (Texas native as well) than with her older sister. The album features some of the most promising young rappers of the state; Scarface, Devin the Dude, as well as a five guest artists including Pharrell Williams (on Almeda and Sound Of Rain), Raphael Saadiq, Earl Sweatshirt, Panda Bear, Tyler the Creator, Dev Hynes alias Blood Orange, Sampha, Metro Boomin, Playboi Carti, Cassie, Steve Lacy from The Internet and even French piano player Christophe Chassol. The guest artists’ appearances are discrete, and Solange always remains the central force in her songs. The tracks are almost ethereal, she hides her 1970’s funk/jazz sounds under a light electro veil Way To The Show and masters a slow-motion rapped R&B My Skin My Lego with Gucci Mane). Solange Knowles provides a sketch, an avant-garde draft more than an accomplished work of art, a unique 39-minute-long composition that is best to be listen to in one go. The album is a powerful and sensual trip that could very likely end up as one of R&B’s top albums of 2019. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 2, 2012 | Terrible Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 27, 2012 | Terrible Records

Pop - Released April 16, 2021 | 1505 Records, Inc.

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R&B - Released September 18, 2015 | MWG - Music World Entertainment Corporation

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R&B - Released October 12, 2010 | MWG - Music World Entertainment Corporation

Solo Star, Solange's debut, lacked character. Not without a small clutch of memorable songs, much of it was nonetheless generic, containing little to separate it from the average R&B album fronted by an up-and-coming performer. Sol-Angel and the Hadley St. Dreams, released five years later, is an entirely different affair -- fun, silly, slightly eccentric and, most importantly, fearless. Steeping an album in classic Motown and other R&B sounds of the late '60s and early '70s may not be the wildest maneuver in 2008, but throughout Sol-Angel, there is a kind of frolicsome adventurousness that is singular and undeniable, even when Solange lets loose with the sourness and addresses her false public image. In spots, it sags, and a couple tracks seem more like sketches than neatly bundled songs, yet it's one of the year's more entertaining and easily enjoyable R&B releases, fronted by someone who does not take herself all that seriously, someone who is slightly more concerned with raw emotion and clowning around than technical prowess and polished product. Solange hasn't merely taken Stevie Wonder and Minnie Riperton's advice to "Take a little trip through your mind and explore it." She has inhabited the space, converting into a combination rumpus room/whimsically ornamented meadow/unmanned Hitsville U.S.A., where she can be herself, pull all the strings, and make her album, whether that entails paying tribute to What's Going On-era Marvin Gaye ("Ode to Marvin"), ringing Lamont Dozier (the Mark Ronson-produced, Dap-Kings-sampling "6 O'Clock Blues"), rewriting Martha & the Vandellas' "Heatwave" ("I Decided"), or collaborating with Cee-Lo and Soulshock & Karlin on a laser-laced shaker that is nothing if not clever ("I'm a cool ol' Jane with a skip on my feet/I play as tough as nails with my heart on my sleeve/I'm nothing but a sandcastle/Don't blow me away"). Most surprisingly, she uses Boards of Canada's typically downcast and alluring "Slow This Bird Down" as a platform for a cathartic kiss-off, the album's true finale, one of three songs not soaked in bouncing pop-soul: "I'm not in denial/I'm not suicidal/Not an alcoholic/I'm not out here ho'in'/So just shut...the fuck...up." Despite the mood and purpose, the song -- because of its invitingly insular nature -- is just as representative of the album as the ones that are dressed in handclaps and horns. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released May 24, 2011 | MWG - Music World Entertainment Corporation

The single “T.O.N.Y.,” off Solange Knowles’s 2008 album, SOL-ANGEL AND THE HADLEY ST. DREAMS, has been the lucky recipient of four separate remixes, each of which are included on the eight-song EP T.O.N.Y. REMIXES. Reworkings by Dan Mckie, Lost Daze, Mark Picchiotti, and Zoned Out are featured in both extended club and radio edit versions, delivering up a fun, constantly changing kaleidoscopic spin on Solange’s bright, singalong hit. © TiVo
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R&B - Released December 7, 2010 | MWG - Music World Entertainment Corporation

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Soul - Released March 17, 2020 | Trinitee Urban Records

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Pop - Released August 25, 2009 | MWG - Music World Entertainment Corporation

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Dance - Released August 17, 2010 | MWG - Music World Entertainment Corporation

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Soul - Released August 18, 2008 | Trinitee Urban Records

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Trance - Released November 12, 2012 | Future Focus Recordings

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R&B - Released May 23, 2011 | MWG - Music World Entertainment Corporation

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Dance - Released April 27, 2010 | Trinitee Urban Records

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Dance - Released November 10, 2008 | Trinitee Urban Records

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Electronic - Released April 16, 2015 | Smilax Records

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Latin America - Released January 1, 2020 | Plaza Independencia

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Dance - Released July 15, 2008 | MWG - Music World Entertainment Corporation