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Rock - Released January 1, 2004 | Polydor Records

Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 8, 2019 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

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It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, the fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz 
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 8, 2019 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 2, 2019 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Polydor Records

If Final Straw introduced Snow Patrol to the mainstream and Eyes Open cemented the band's popularity, then A Hundred Million Suns is the group's ultimate bid for stardom, its slick production and sonic uplift designed to maintain Snow Patrol's place in the charts. Like "Chasing Cars," the mega-single from Snow Patrol's previous album, tracks like "Take Back the City" and "If There's a Rocket Tie Me to It" are slyly repetitive -- their hooks are cyclic, each comprising only a handful of notes, and their straightforward familiarity helps maximize the songs' singalong potential. But A Hundred Million Suns also features more curve balls than the band's past catalog, from "Lifeboats" (an icy love song with synthesizer glissandos and falsetto harmonies) to "The Golden Floor," whose handclap-and-stomp intro recalls the light hip-hop flavor of OneRepublic's "Apologize." This is where Snow Patrol sound best -- at the intersection between marketable pop/rock and something more challenging, whether it's an unexpected arrangement or an interesting melodic turn. The band's appeal also owes a good deal to Gary Lightbody, who maintains his status as the least famous frontman of a very famous band. He's the boy next door, a musical Everyman who's just as average looking as Chris Martin and only half as desperately self-effacing. Looks may have little to do with an artist's music, but such appearances help ground Snow Patrol's music, even while "Take Back the City" and "Please Take These Photos from My Hands" reach for the same stars that U2 routinely grab. When A Hundred Million Suns focuses on music -- not saccharine radio fodder like "Chasing Cars," but actual music, with twists and turns that haven't been mapped out by generations of likeminded balladeers -- the album warrants Snow Patrol's existing fame, presenting a band that aspires to pop/rock grandeur without developing the accompanying ego. ~ Andrew Leahey
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 5, 2019 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released May 1, 2006 | Polydor Records

The anthemic indie rock sound of Snow Patrol provides a bit of hope and promise among the many acts attempting to fit into a certain genre or scene. Snow Patrol belongs to their own scene, and their third album, 2004's Final Straw, proved that with several global hit singles such as "Run," "Chocolate," "How to Be Dead," and the reissue of "Spitting Games." British fans once more proclaimed their beloved Snow Patrol as a true rock & roll band while American audiences finally took notice of the Scottish collective. The band's fourth album, Eyes Open, doesn't fall short from where they left off; in fact, Snow Patrol's hungry rock sound only gets bigger and better this time around. All guitar hooks and singalong choruses are firmly in place, and Gary Lightbody is an underrated frontman. On Eyes Open, he once again writes songs that are from the heart and true to self-reflection without getting too sappy and too overjoyed. From the playful name-dropping of Sufjan Stevens on "Hands Open" to their passionate delivery on "It's Beginning to Get to Me" and "Shut Your Eyes," Snow Patrol's approach is epic. They are the kind of band that embraces simplicity as beautiful and human flaws as art. The lullaby-like "You Could Be Happy" and the passionate buildup of "Make This Go on Forever" are evident of that. This 11-song set is a masterpiece, so keep your ears and eyes open for Snow Patrol. They're onto something big. ~ MacKenzie Wilson
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res Booklet
It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, the fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz 
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

Booklet
It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, the fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz 
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 9, 2019 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 9, 2018 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released December 7, 2018 | A&M (UC)

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 24, 2006 | Jeepster Recordings Ltd

Booklet
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

Booklet
It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz 
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 3, 2018 | Blue Pie Records

On its second album, Snow Patrol takes a significant leap forward in terms of artistry and vision. It was perhaps too easy to write the trio off as a sub-Belle & Sebastian combo after its debut, what with the aural similarities to that band and the fact that they were both on Jeepster. And the music here still has characteristically lush and gentle moments -- and still intermittently echoes their better-known labelmates ("Batten Down the Hatch," "On/Off") -- sometimes barely rising above a whisper, while the subject matter is dour and brittle as ever. Snow Patrol again dwells on bad dreams and heartbreak, regrets and one-night stands, tempering even the few rays of sunlight with wounded or downbeat thoughts. And on songs like the nightmarishly paced dirge "If I'd Found the Right Words to Say," the mood befits the content. But When It's All Over We Still Have to Clear Up breaks dramatically and sensationally with the cult of twee. It is not a subdued or stilted album, either musically or emotionally, which not only makes the band's melancholia palatable but also renders it substantial and genuine rather than affected. The music is still extremely tuneful, but songs such as "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again," "Last Ever Lone Gunman," and "One Night Is Not Enough" are truly guitar-driven things (occasionally with subtle electronics) that underscore a determinedness and passionate vitality often lacking in similar inclined approaches (including, sometimes, Belle). When "Black and Blue" abruptly transitions from barely there falsetto crooning to a grinding, overdriven guitar assault, it sounds like a call to arms. Rather than small and insular, the album is open, grand, and beautiful. ~ Stanton Swihart
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 12, 2001 | Jeepster Recordings Ltd

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records