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£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2004 | Polydor

Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
With Final Straw, Snow Patrol mainman Gary Lightbody seems to take all the inspiration he's gathered from the superstar collaborators in his Reindeer Section project and bundle it into a series of earnest bombastic rock ballads. Producer Garrett Lee deserves credit up-front for expanding the band's sound even further from the lush symphonic grandeur of When It's All Over We Still Have to Clear Up. Here, Lightbody and his cohorts traverse the same anthemic territory as Idlewild, with guitars cranked to the max. But where his friend Roddy Woomble of Idlewild soars all over the map vocally, Lightbody prefers the immediate and somewhat indifferent vocal style of another friend, Aidan Moffat of Arab Strap. Indeed, much of Final Straw feels like a middle ground between these two bands, if not for the violins, xylophones, and percussion Lee layers into the mix. Thanks to extra ornamentation, "Gleaming Auction" steps into the swirling realm of Rollerskate Skinny, as wobbly dynamics add interest to punishing guitars. If one gets the sense that Lightbody is shuffling through influences, ranging from all of the above-mentioned bands to Radiohead, Coldplay ("Somewhere a Clock Is Ticking" seems to be a more rocking cousin to Coldplay's "Clocks"), and even Pink Floyd (on the unmistakably Dark Side of the Moon-influenced "Same"), his mastery of mood and adherence to harmonies make for a consistently coherent and compelling 40 minutes. Highlights include the throbbing cacophony that is "Wow" and "Spitting Games," which seems like a cascading Wall of Sound feedback-free descendant of My Bloody Valentine. Final Straw is another strong slab of emotion and invigorating energy from a solid band that mixes its influences into an always heady sonic libation. ~ Tim DiGravina
£16.49
£11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res Booklet
It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, the fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz  
£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | Polydor

The anthemic indie rock sound of Snow Patrol provides a bit of hope and promise among the many acts attempting to fit into a certain genre or scene. Snow Patrol belongs to their own scene, and their third album, 2004's Final Straw, proved that with several global hit singles such as "Run," "Chocolate," "How to Be Dead," and the reissue of "Spitting Games." British fans once more proclaimed their beloved Snow Patrol as a true rock & roll band while American audiences finally took notice of the Scottish collective. The band's fourth album, Eyes Open, doesn't fall short from where they left off; in fact, Snow Patrol's hungry rock sound only gets bigger and better this time around. All guitar hooks and singalong choruses are firmly in place, and Gary Lightbody is an underrated frontman. On Eyes Open, he once again writes songs that are from the heart and true to self-reflection without getting too sappy and too overjoyed. From the playful name-dropping of Sufjan Stevens on "Hands Open" to their passionate delivery on "It's Beginning to Get to Me" and "Shut Your Eyes," Snow Patrol's approach is epic. They are the kind of band that embraces simplicity as beautiful and human flaws as art. The lullaby-like "You Could Be Happy" and the passionate buildup of "Make This Go on Forever" are evident of that. This 11-song set is a masterpiece, so keep your ears and eyes open for Snow Patrol. They're onto something big. ~ MacKenzie Wilson
£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | Universal Music Division Mercury Records

The anthemic indie rock sound of Snow Patrol provides a bit of hope and promise among the many acts attempting to fit into a certain genre or scene. Snow Patrol belongs to their own scene, and their third album, 2004's Final Straw, proved that with several global hit singles such as "Run," "Chocolate," "How to Be Dead," and the reissue of "Spitting Games." British fans once more proclaimed their beloved Snow Patrol as a true rock & roll band while American audiences finally took notice of the Scottish collective. The band's fourth album, Eyes Open, doesn't fall short from where they left off; in fact, Snow Patrol's hungry rock sound only gets bigger and better this time around. All guitar hooks and singalong choruses are firmly in place, and Gary Lightbody is an underrated frontman. On Eyes Open, he once again writes songs that are from the heart and true to self-reflection without getting too sappy and too overjoyed. From the playful name-dropping of Sufjan Stevens on "Hands Open" to their passionate delivery on "It's Beginning to Get to Me" and "Shut Your Eyes," Snow Patrol's approach is epic. They are the kind of band that embraces simplicity as beautiful and human flaws as art. The lullaby-like "You Could Be Happy" and the passionate buildup of "Make This Go on Forever" are evident of that. This 11-song set is a masterpiece, so keep your ears and eyes open for Snow Patrol. They're onto something big. ~ MacKenzie Wilson
£2.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | Polydor

£12.49

Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

Booklet
It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz  
£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Polydor

£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released March 22, 2018 | Polydor Records

£15.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

Booklet
It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, the fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz  
£17.49
£12.49

Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res Booklet
It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, the fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz  
£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released May 10, 2018 | Polydor Records

£3.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 24, 2006 | Jeepster Recordings Ltd

Booklet
Snow Patrol's 1998 disc on Jeepster Records showcases the band's sometimes-edgy indie rock and occasionally spacy indie pop. The Edinburgh, Scotland, trio mixes tempos immediately, starting off with the crunchy "Downhill from Here" and the exuberantly poppy "Starfighter Pilot." The pace slows down quickly with the third track, the withdrawn and melancholy "The Last Show Ringing in My Ears." The borderline hip-hop beats of the fourth track, "Absolute Gravity," startle the listener, making it clear that listening to the disc is going to be a colorful ride. "Mahogany" is another acoustic-based ballad, sticking out on a disc full of non-traditional beats and chords. All of the songs highlight the band's earnest approach to songwriting. Tracks like "Velocity Girl" and "Favorite Friend" are some of the disc's catchiest and most endearing songs, calling upon a pop sensibility that's somehow different from the standard 1990s indie artists. Over-indulgent song titles like "One Hundred Things You Should Have Done in Bed" and "When You're Right You're Right (Darth Vader Bringing in His Washing Mix)" are examples of the band's unabashedly quirky approach to music. They're able to pull it off with their undeniable musicianship and musical sensibilities. On Songs for Polar Bears, Gary Lightbody appears on guitars, vocals, and keyboards, while Mark McClelland chimes in on bass and keyboards and drummer Jonny Quinn rounds out the lineup. Guest artists include Isobel Campbell, Richard Colburn, Fraser Simpson, and Tom Simpson. The album was recorded in Edinburgh, Scotland, by producer Jamie Watson. ~ Stephen Cramer
£1.39

Humour/Spoken Word - Released November 20, 2000 | Jeepster Recordings Ltd

£7.19

Alternative & Indie - Released January 3, 2018 | Blue Pie Records

£2.99
Run

Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | Polydor

£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2018 | Polydor Records

£7.19

Alternative & Indie - Released December 8, 2017 | Blue Pie Records

£2.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Universal Music Division Mercury Records

£2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2009 | Universal Music Division Mercury Records

£12.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor

Up to Now is nothing if not a thorough album, with Snow Patrol diving headfirst into its vaults to compile a 30-track set of radio hits, rarities, new songs, and deep cuts. As a result, this reads less like a best-of compilation and more like a catch-up for those fans who climbed aboard circa "Chasing Cars," which began its joyride up and down the singles charts in 2006. Up to Now takes much of its material from that hit-making period, but it also reaches as far backward as 1998, demonstrating the band's growth and longevity in the process. For those accustomed to the band's straight-faced anthems, a cover of Beyoncé's "Crazy in Love" adds some humor to the mix. Three new songs are also included, with the slow-building, understated "Give Me Strength" standing out as one of the band's strongest tracks in years. Up to Now may be somewhat overwhelming for casual listeners -- it's quite extensive, with the traditional hits sprinkled throughout a double-disc track list -- but there's no better destination for a fan looking to consolidate his collection. ~ Andrew Leahey