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Metal - Released August 9, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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The masked Iowans sixth full-length effort, We Are Not Your Kind, sees a confidant and apoplectic Slipknot in full command of their craft, delivering a searing 14-track set that's as versatile as it is observant of nu-metal's architectural truisms. Far removed from the desultory aggro-metal being dished out by veteran contemporaries like Saliva and Limp Bizkit, We Are Not Your Kind bristles with both intent and imagination. Corey Taylor and company have weathered their fair share of personal and professional woes over the years -- overdose, divorce, lineup changes, and lawsuits, not to mention an increasingly mercurial musical landscape -- but they have consistently managed to turn misfortune into grist for the sonic mill. After a short cinematic opening, the band gets down to business with fiery lead single "Unsainted," an infectious marriage of melody and might and a juggernaut of stadium-ready rage. The transient "Death Because of Death," with its carnival-like electro-industrial pulses and eerie refrain of "Death because of death because of you," sets the table for the unrelenting groove-laden rap-metal of "Nero Forte." The group goes full-on electro-rock -- think Imagine Dragons-meets-Korn -- on the sleek and sinewy "Spiders," and add twisty, melancholic progressive rock to their arsenal on the surprisingly heartfelt "My Pain" and the turbo-charged High on Fire-esque stoner metal on the uncompromising closer "Solway Firth." More than anything else, We Are Not Your Kind feels locked-in on a personal level -- that aforementioned sense of melancholy resides uncomfortably close to the surface throughout -- and that human touch resonates, even as the band unleashes volley after volley of tribal rhythms, scorching riffage, and fathomless decibels. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Metal - Released October 17, 2014 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released June 12, 1999 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released October 15, 2014 | Roadrunner Records

While even a cursory listen to Slipknot's back catalog makes it clear the band are no strangers to working out their inner turmoil and pain through their music, never has that idea been so abundantly clear as it is on their fifth outing, .5: The Gray Chapter. Their first studio album since 2008's All Hope Is Gone, the album finds the band still recovering from the loss of founding bassist Paul Gray, whose death in 2010 hit them pretty hard. Rather than allowing their pain and anger destroy them, they were able to harness that energy and focus it, allowing them to create one of their most visceral and dynamic albums to date. Combining the punishing, pummeling metal of the band's early work with the more melodic focus of their later years, The Gray Chapter shows off just how unexpectedly wide the band's range is, going from a plaintive, atmospheric ballad like album-opener "XIX" to a thrash-inspired pummeling like "Sarcastrophe" without missing a beat. Along with being Slipknot's first album without Gray, it's also notable for being their first album not to feature longtime drummer Joey Jordison, who parted ways with the band in 2013. While Jordison will certainly be missed, the band's mysterious new drummer, whose identity the band have done their damndest not to reveal, slots in marvelously, seamlessly acclimating to the band's suddenly shifting tempos and styles. Listening to the album, it's clear that even though Slipknot aren't over the loss of a dear friend and colleague, they're able to channel their grief into a productive album, allowing them to continue moving forward while paying tribute to a fallen comrade with one of the strongest albums of their career. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Metal - Released August 27, 2001 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released May 17, 2004 | Roadrunner Records

Slipknot set out to construct the ultimate metal music flamethrower, ever since their genesis in a Des Moines, IA, basement. But they also deployed an agitprop campaign of masks, smocks, and bar codes that helped scare parents (like good metal should) and transform Slipknot fans into faithful "maggots." The Midwestern origin of all this craziness is genius, as the band's marrow-draining metal and twisted, fibrous mythology is antithetical to the region's milquetoast rep. Still, after the gothic nausea of 2001's Iowa, Slipknot's vitality dissipated in clouds of gaseous hype and individual indulgence. Had they grown fat on their thrones? Probably. But the layoff only makes Vol. 3: The Subliminal Verses scream louder. Working with famously bearded helmer Rick Rubin -- aka He Who Smites Bullsh*t -- Slipknot pour the shrill accessibility of their self-titled debut down Iowa's dark sieve, and the result is flinty, angry, and rewardingly restless. Vol. 3 shares its lyrical themes of anger, disaffection, and psychosis with most of Slipknot's nu-metal peers. Lines like "I've screamed until my veins collapsed" and "Push my fingers into my eyes/It's the only thing that slowly stops the ache" (from the otherwise strong "Duality") aren't unique to this cult. But unlike so many, the band's sound rarely disassembles into genre building blocks: riff + glowering vocal + throaty chorus = Ozfest acceptance. What makes Vol. 3 tick is the dedication to making it a Slipknot album, and not just another flashy alt-metal billboard. The seething anger and preoccupation with pain is valid because it's componential to the group's uniquely branded havoc. "Blister Exists," "Three Nil," and "Opium of the People" are all standouts, strafing soft underbellies with rhythmic (occasionally melodic) vocals, stuttering, quadruple-helix percussion, and muted grindcore guitar. Rubin is integral to the album's power -- his cataclysmic vocal filters and arrays of unidentifiable squiggle and squelch unite Vol. 3's various portions in wildly different ways. Just when the meditative "Circles" threatens to keel over from melodrama, in sputters strings of damaged electronics and percussion to lead it into "Welcome," which sounds like Helmet covering Relapse Records' entire catalog at once. Later, another counterpoint is offered, when the swift boot kicks of "Pulse of the Maggots" and "Before I Forget" separate "Vermilion"'s gothic and acoustic parts. Vol. 3: The Subliminal Verses doesn't feel like Slipknot's final statement. It's a satisfying, carefully crafted representation of their career to date. But there's a sense that whatever Slipknot do next might be their ultimate broadcast to the faithful. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Metal - Released August 22, 2008 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released June 12, 1999 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released October 15, 2014 | Roadrunner Records

While even a cursory listen to Slipknot's back catalog makes it clear the band are no strangers to working out their inner turmoil and pain through their music, never has that idea been so abundantly clear as it is on their fifth outing, .5: The Gray Chapter. Their first studio album since 2008's All Hope Is Gone, the album finds the band still recovering from the loss of founding bassist Paul Gray, whose death in 2010 hit them pretty hard. Rather than allowing their pain and anger destroy them, they were able to harness that energy and focus it, allowing them to create one of their most visceral and dynamic albums to date. Combining the punishing, pummeling metal of the band's early work with the more melodic focus of their later years, The Gray Chapter shows off just how unexpectedly wide the band's range is, going from a plaintive, atmospheric ballad like album-opener "XIX" to a thrash-inspired pummeling like "Sarcastrophe" without missing a beat. Along with being Slipknot's first album without Gray, it's also notable for being their first album not to feature longtime drummer Joey Jordison, who parted ways with the band in 2013. While Jordison will certainly be missed, the band's mysterious new drummer, whose identity the band have done their damndest not to reveal, slots in marvelously, seamlessly acclimating to the band's suddenly shifting tempos and styles. Listening to the album, it's clear that even though Slipknot aren't over the loss of a dear friend and colleague, they're able to channel their grief into a productive album, allowing them to continue moving forward while paying tribute to a fallen comrade with one of the strongest albums of their career. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Metal - Released October 20, 2017 | Eagle Rock Entertainment

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Metal - Released August 20, 2008 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released August 22, 2008 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released November 1, 2005 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released July 16, 2012 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released May 24, 2004 | Roadrunner Records

Slipknot set out to construct the ultimate metal music flamethrower, ever since their genesis in a Des Moines, IA, basement. But they also deployed an agitprop campaign of masks, smocks, and bar codes that helped scare parents (like good metal should) and transform Slipknot fans into faithful "maggots." The Midwestern origin of all this craziness is genius, as the band's marrow-draining metal and twisted, fibrous mythology is antithetical to the region's milquetoast rep. Still, after the gothic nausea of 2001's Iowa, Slipknot's vitality dissipated in clouds of gaseous hype and individual indulgence. Had they grown fat on their thrones? Probably. But the layoff only makes Vol. 3: The Subliminal Verses scream louder. Working with famously bearded helmer Rick Rubin -- aka He Who Smites Bullsh*t -- Slipknot pour the shrill accessibility of their self-titled debut down Iowa's dark sieve, and the result is flinty, angry, and rewardingly restless. Vol. 3 shares its lyrical themes of anger, disaffection, and psychosis with most of Slipknot's nu-metal peers. Lines like "I've screamed until my veins collapsed" and "Push my fingers into my eyes/It's the only thing that slowly stops the ache" (from the otherwise strong "Duality") aren't unique to this cult. But unlike so many, the band's sound rarely disassembles into genre building blocks: riff + glowering vocal + throaty chorus = Ozfest acceptance. What makes Vol. 3 tick is the dedication to making it a Slipknot album, and not just another flashy alt-metal billboard. The seething anger and preoccupation with pain is valid because it's componential to the group's uniquely branded havoc. "Blister Exists," "Three Nil," and "Opium of the People" are all standouts, strafing soft underbellies with rhythmic (occasionally melodic) vocals, stuttering, quadruple-helix percussion, and muted grindcore guitar. Rubin is integral to the album's power -- his cataclysmic vocal filters and arrays of unidentifiable squiggle and squelch unite Vol. 3's various portions in wildly different ways. Just when the meditative "Circles" threatens to keel over from melodrama, in sputters strings of damaged electronics and percussion to lead it into "Welcome," which sounds like Helmet covering Relapse Records' entire catalog at once. Later, another counterpoint is offered, when the swift boot kicks of "Pulse of the Maggots" and "Before I Forget" separate "Vermilion"'s gothic and acoustic parts. Vol. 3: The Subliminal Verses doesn't feel like Slipknot's final statement. It's a satisfying, carefully crafted representation of their career to date. But there's a sense that whatever Slipknot do next might be their ultimate broadcast to the faithful. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Metal - Released July 16, 2012 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released October 31, 2018 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released May 16, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released November 1, 2005 | Roadrunner Records

In ten years Slipknot have never compromised. They've never written a power ballad; they've rarely even removed their masks. Slipknot have become alt metal stars the real way, through relentless touring, embracing fan support, and penning some truly brutal songs. They're not in it for the money, even if they're making the money. So is the message in 9.0: Live's liner notes arrogance or searing, unblinking confidence? "Nine men on stage...pushing chaos so far past the limit all the onlookers can do is scream and hold on for dear fucking life." It's almost certainly confidence -- Slipknot have lived it. But let the Maggots decide, because that's who 9.0 is for. Their faithful roar -- and in particular their relationship with Slipknot vocalist Corey Taylor -- is what unifies the performances on 9.0, recorded in 2004 and 2005 during the group's touring for Vol. 3: The Subliminal Verses. The crowd's collective yell is another instrument in the gristly, swirling mix of "Pulse of the Maggots," a disc one highlight along with "The Blister Exists," "Before I Forget," and the churning "(Sic)." Disc two begins with "Three Nil," a layered and lurching thrill that's as chaotically groovy as classic Mr. Bungle. Taylor demands to see the outstretched devil horns for "Heretic Anthem," and that leads into a coldly creeping version of Iowa's title track. With its whining guitars and faraway screams, the song's like the horrible radio transmission of a shortwave numbers station perched on a precipice in hell. "Spit it Out" is one of the only enduring classics of rap and metal's fusion, and its seamless transition into "People = S#!t" is one of the set's most engulfing moments. If there was even a question after a decade of destruction, 9.0 proves the rewarding brutality of Slipknot live. So when they're beating on the back of your skull with an aluminum bat, looking for a mind to change, are you going to call them arrogant, or believe in the confidence? © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Metal - Released August 25, 2014 | Roadrunner Records