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Classical - Released May 15, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Ivor Bolton and the Basel Symphony Orchestra continue their exploration into Fauré’s music with the third instalment in their series, devoted to religious music this time. Although he was the organist for the Madeleine Church in Paris, Fauré was not religious and only wrote a handful of religious pieces. While the Requiem is featured as the main attraction in this album and is still very well-known, by contrast, the Messe des pêcheurs de Villerville (Mass of the fisherman of Villerville) is a more simplistic treasure to be discovered. This Messe was the product of his friendship with André Messager and was composed for four-handed piano in the small fishing village on the coast of Normandy between Trouville and Honfleur, where the two composers had gone on holiday. After the success of the first performance of the original version for women’s choir, harmonium and violin, Messager arranged the first four parts of this mass and Fauré the last. It was finally published in 1907 in a heavily amended form under the name Messe basse (“Low mass”, meaning a mass without music), but Ivor Bolton and his singers and musicians have performed the original version here. Fauré received an honourable mention at the age of just eighteen when he submitted the magnificent Psalm, “Super flumina Babylonis” to a composition competition in the Niedermayer School in Paris. He won the first prize the following year with his composition dedicated to César Franck entitled Cantique de Jean Racine (“Chant by Jean Racine”), which is more widely known nowadays. Also featured on the album is the rare gem Passion, a prologue for Edmond Haraucourt’s play “Mystère En Deux Chants Et Six Parties” that was written in 1890 without Fauré’s music. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 17, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released May 15, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released April 10, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Ivor Bolton and the Basel Symphony Orchestra continue their exploration into Fauré’s music with the third instalment in their series, devoted to religious music this time. Although he was the organist for the Madeleine Church in Paris, Fauré was not religious and only wrote a handful of religious pieces. While the Requiem is featured as the main attraction in this album and is still very well-known, by contrast, the Messe des pêcheurs de Villerville (Mass of the fisherman of Villerville) is a more simplistic treasure to be discovered. This Messe was the product of his friendship with André Messager and was composed for four-handed piano in the small fishing village on the coast of Normandy between Trouville and Honfleur, where the two composers had gone on holiday. After the success of the first performance of the original version for women’s choir, harmonium and violin, Messager arranged the first four parts of this mass and Fauré the last. It was finally published in 1907 in a heavily amended form under the name Messe basse (“Low mass”, meaning a mass without music), but Ivor Bolton and his singers and musicians have performed the original version here. Fauré received an honourable mention at the age of just eighteen when he submitted the magnificent Psalm, “Super flumina Babylonis” to a composition competition in the Niedermayer School in Paris. He won the first prize the following year with his composition dedicated to César Franck entitled Cantique de Jean Racine (“Chant by Jean Racine”), which is more widely known nowadays. Also featured on the album is the rare gem Passion, a prologue for Edmond Haraucourt’s play “Mystère En Deux Chants Et Six Parties” that was written in 1890 without Fauré’s music. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 22, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released August 5, 2016 | Sinfonieorchester Basel

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Classical - Released November 3, 2017 | Tudor

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Classical - Released November 17, 2009 | Ondine

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Vladimir Ashkenazy can conduct anything from Beethoven to Stravinsky, with stops along the way for Brahms, Dvorák, Debussy, and Berg, as well as such relatively unfamiliar composers like Josef Suk. Here, Ashkenazy has gathered four infrequently heard works by Bohuslav Martinu -- his orchestral Overture from 1934, Les Fresques de Piera della Francesca from 1956, and two of his piano concertos, the Second from 1934, and Fourth from 1956 -- and given each work the deluxe treatment with the aid of the expert Sinfonieorchester Basel. Although Martinu's unique combination of piquant colors, opulent sonorities, lyrical melodies, and vigorous rhythms has defeated many other conductors' interpretive efforts, Ashkenazy does a superlative job of realizing all these elements in exactly the right proportions. Most importantly, he brings Martinu's music to vital life, from the Overture's ebullient excitement to Les Fresques' luminous ecstasy. Joined by virtuoso Swiss pianist Robert Kilinsky in the concertos, Ashkenazy has delivered a Martinu recording that every fan of the composer will want to hear again and again, particularly in Ondine's crisp, clean but highly evocative digital sound. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 10, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released June 1, 2006 | CPO

Despite their vast knowledge and profound understanding of music, great conductors are not always great composers. Even one as talented and prolific as Felix Weingartner was something less than a true genius in his own music, though a work as vigorous and colorful as his Symphony No. 3 in E major, Op. 49 (1910), may persuade some that he was at least ingenious. This grandiose work has a broad Brucknerian scope, with more than a little of the influence of Richard Strauss' tone poems and the symphonies of Saint-Saëns and Mahler, so at least on the strength of such resemblances it will appeal to fans of post-Romantic music. In many ways, this symphony seems to be an amalgam of those composers, and one may be tempted to guess which bits were inspired by them, if not cribbed outright. Yet serious listeners may find that Weingartner's own personality is under-developed here, and that the impressive surfaces of the piece disguise a weak musical argument as well. The excessive breadth of the form, with a duration of more than an hour, and the extreme variety of expressions make this piece seem confusing and unnecessarily inflated. (The Adagio, by itself almost 19 minutes long, is the most taxing movement, especially with its tediously drawn out build-up and pompous climax -- with organ, no less!) While one can be impressed that he made the effort, Weingartner's skills were perhaps better suited to shorter works, such as the entertaining, if meandering, Lustige Overture, Op. 53; this amiable filler is a suitable foil to the expansive symphony, and gives some insight into Weingartner's lighter side. Marko Letonja and the Basel Symphony Orchestra give vibrant and enthusiastic performances of both works, and the multi-channel surround sound of this hybrid SACD is truly enjoyable for its brilliance, depth, and realistic presence. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 3, 2018 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released March 11, 2016 | Sinfonieorchester Basel

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Classical - Released February 13, 2014 | Musiques Suisses

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Classical - Released November 4, 2014 | Sinfonieorchester Basel

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Classical - Released April 26, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released May 8, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Pop - Released November 15, 2019 | Sony Classical

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