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Electro - Released May 14, 2012 | Wichita Recordings

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Unpatterns comes across as a reaction to Simian Mobile Disco's previous two full-length releases. Temporary Pleasure (2009) featured a series of guest vocalists over productions that were largely busy and bright. Delicacies (2010) compiled alternately nutty and stern tracks that resembled a soundclash between the Perlon and 240 Volts labels circa 2003. Unpatterns, comparatively, is leaner and more insular. Save for a discreet appearance from Jamie Lidell on the jacking "Put Your Hands Together," the few voices that are heard are sampled, distressed, and sometimes made to sound inhuman. The half-blissful/half-anguished "Your Love Ain't Fair" recalls Sepalcure's smudged U.K. garage take on bass music. "Seraphim," the closest to a diva track with the looped "Why can't you be where I want you to be?," is downcast house with a brilliantly wrenching rhythm and taut acid wriggles. The closing "Pareidolia" is one of the duo's most remarkable achievements to date. It pairs reverberant, dripping-wet percussion flecks with hot synthesizer flashes that reach an almost numbing level of intensity before settling into a heavy groove. Just as that groove reaches full stride, it's wiped out by a sustained corrosive synthesizer note. In terms of popularity, the album is not likely to rival Attack Decay Sustain Release. It's not as novel, either, but it's exceptionally crafted. ~ Andy Kellman
£11.99
£8.49

Electro - Released May 11, 2018 | Wichita Recordings

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James Ford and Jas Shaw's sixth full-length album as Simian Mobile Disco was written in collaboration with Deep Throat Choir, whose presence is so center-stage that they deserve to be billed as the main performers instead of just a featuring credit. DTC have successfully taken the choir concept and made it relevant, far surpassing any novelty factor and garnering respect throughout the industry, particularly -- and peculiarly -- in dance music circles. Perhaps fittingly, then, Murmurations seems more like a much-deserved platform for the choir rather than a full-blown Simian Mobile Disco record. There's no denying that the album has been produced with finesse; it just doesn't come close to the peaks found on previous SMD albums. There's been a solid history of vocal collaborations within their back catalog: for example, their biggest pop crossovers appeared on Temporary Pleasure, where the likes of Beth Ditto could be found chiming in over their early, more jagged sound. Here we find the techno-lite/minimal approach of phase-two SMD offset by the gliding harmonies of DTC, exemplified by lead single "Caught in a Wave," which creeps along eerily but fails to crescendo; "Cruel Intentions" this certainly isn't, and the Justice remix of "We Are Your Friends" couldn't be further from their current location. Which is fine; if anything, Ford and Shaw have transformed gracefully over the course of their career, gradually reining it in to find new solace in the underground while maintaining a festival-ready, larger-vibe persona that they can dust off and reanimate as needed. That Murmurations finds them hovering in the background isn't necessarily bad either, but the talents of DTC and their hive-like harmonics outshine the sheen of the tracks they appear on, seen clearly on the singles "Hey Sister" and "Defender." Every track has a pleasant flow, with the production only really coming to the forefront on "A Perfect Swarm," which builds to the midway tipping point with the same degree of precision and balance that SMD have demonstrated in the past. During "V Formation," the synthetic and harmonic elements intertwine until they are essentially one and the same; undoubtedly the overall point of this project. With that in mind, it might seem unfair to say DTC steal the show, as after all they could be framed as just another instrument, or human synthesizer as Shaw himself puts it. That doesn't change the fact that Murmurations is a standout moment for Deep Throat Choir, while in the Simian Mobile Disco canon it sits as an interesting and pleasant experience but, ultimately, a sideline in their discography. ~ Liam Martin
£9.49

Dance - Released February 20, 2012 | Wichita Recordings

Producers of dance music (or any music, for that matter) can innovate all they want, but without great songs and excellent productions, they'll never add much to the canon of great records. James Shaw and James Ford, who make up Simian Mobile Disco, are a pair of producers who may not innovate very much -- their chosen field, acid house and acid techno, are relative dinosaurs in the genre -- but they impress much more with the excitement and energy of their productions and songs. There haven't been half a dozen other dance records since Daft Punk's Homework that carry such a raft of great productions, or balance so well what it sounds like to put on an excellent club night within the confines of an LP (especially one that's barely longer than 30 minutes). Simian Mobile Disco also share with Daft Punk (and with younger acts like Spank Rock) the belief that the latest generation of gear doesn't necessarily equate to the best music. Attack Decay Sustain Release has the raw flavor of the best dance records of the '80s and '90s: red-line acid squelching, extroverted vocal features, synth-pop ballads that simply ooze drama, and productions that end in a far different place than where they began. Using vintage gear certainly doesn't always make for great music, but forced simplicity often helps spur the creative process -- and definitely has in this case. Miles away from the usual ranks of cold, programmed-to-perfection dance records, Simian Mobile Disco's debut is a dance record with energy to burn but also subtlety and flair. ~ John Bush
£15.99
£13.99

Electro - Released September 5, 2014 | Anti - Epitaph

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£10.49

Techno - Released October 20, 2017 | Wichita Recordings

£8.49

Techno - Released September 28, 2018 | Wichita Recordings

£8.49

Electro - Released August 11, 2008 | Fabric Worldwide

Simian Mobile Disco are one of the few dance groups with little high-level DJing experience, which marks their edition in the Fabric series as one that comes with a few question marks. Would they have anything to say, or any new tracks to foist upon listeners always eager for the next high? Would they play it safe and loft a few of their influences from the days of acid house? Would they even play dance music? (Well, no Fabric mix has been completely dance-free -- especially not a live edition -- so there's little to worry about there.) Fabriclive.41 does display a few of Simian's roots, it does shoehorn a few surprises, and it airs more than a few up-to-the-minute tracks from labels aboveground as well as underground. Much like their debut LP, Fabriclive.41 is paced perfectly, picking up and winding down several times, like a good dance set should. The first peak comes with Discodeine's excellent "Joystick," and after a few minutes of wind down, Metro Area's past classic "Miura" picks things up again. Highlights of the second half include the tongue-in-cheek acid of Deadmau5's "The Reward Is Cheese." ~ John Bush
£5.49

Techno - Released October 6, 2017 | Wichita Recordings

£0.99

Dance - Released February 21, 2018 | Wichita Recordings

£13.99

Electro - Released September 1, 2014 | Anti - Epitaph

£1.39

Electro - Released May 23, 2006 | Kitsune

£13.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Co-operative Music

£8.49

Electro - Released July 28, 2008 | Wichita Recordings

£2.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Associated Labels

£9.49

Electro - Released June 15, 2009 | Wichita Recordings

£2.49

Electro - Released April 9, 2012 | Wichita Recordings

£2.49

Electro - Released June 18, 2012 | Wichita Recordings

£2.99

Electro - Released October 1, 2012 | Wichita Recordings

£0.99

Techno - Released September 20, 2017 | Wichita Recordings

£8.49

Electro - Released May 14, 2012 | Wichita Recordings

Unpatterns comes across as a reaction to Simian Mobile Disco's previous two full-length releases. Temporary Pleasure (2009) featured a series of guest vocalists over productions that were largely busy and bright. Delicacies (2010) compiled alternately nutty and stern tracks that resembled a soundclash between the Perlon and 240 Volts labels circa 2003. Unpatterns, comparatively, is leaner and more insular. Save for a discreet appearance from Jamie Lidell on the jacking "Put Your Hands Together," the few voices that are heard are sampled, distressed, and sometimes made to sound inhuman. The half-blissful/half-anguished "Your Love Ain't Fair" recalls Sepalcure's smudged U.K. garage take on bass music. "Seraphim," the closest to a diva track with the looped "Why can't you be where I want you to be?," is downcast house with a brilliantly wrenching rhythm and taut acid wriggles. The closing "Pareidolia" is one of the duo's most remarkable achievements to date. It pairs reverberant, dripping-wet percussion flecks with hot synthesizer flashes that reach an almost numbing level of intensity before settling into a heavy groove. Just as that groove reaches full stride, it's wiped out by a sustained corrosive synthesizer note. In terms of popularity, the album is not likely to rival Attack Decay Sustain Release. It's not as novel, either, but it's exceptionally crafted. ~ Andy Kellman