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Pop - Released January 1, 1996 | A&M

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Hiring noted roots experimentalists Tchad Blake and Mitchell Froom as engineer and consultant, respectively, Sheryl Crow took a cue from their Latin Playboys project for her second album -- she kept her roots rock foundation and added all sorts of noises, weird instruments, percussion loops, and off-balance production to give Sheryl Crow a distinctly modern flavor. And, even with the Stonesy grind of "Sweet Rosalyn" or hippie spirits of "Love Is a Good Thing," it is an album that couldn't have been made any other time than the '90s. As strange as it may sound, Sheryl Crow is a postmodern masterpiece of sorts -- albeit a mainstream, post-alternative, postmodern masterpiece. It may not be as hip or innovative as, say, the Beastie Boys' Paul's Boutique, but it is as self-referential, pop culture obsessed, and musically eclectic. Throughout the record, Crow spins out wild, nearly incomprehensible stream-of-consciousness lyrics, dropping celebrity names and products every chance she gets ("drinking Falstaff beer/Mercedes Ruehl and a rented Leer"). Often, these litanies don't necessarily add up to anything specific, but they're a perfect match for the mess of rock, blues, alt-rock, country, folk, and lite hip-hop loops that dominate the record. At her core, she remains a traditionalist -- the songcraft behind the infectious "Change Would Do You Good," the bubbly "Everyday Is a Winding Road," and the weary "If It Makes You Happy" helped get the singles on the radio -- but the production and lyrics are often at odds with those instincts, creating for a fascinating and compelling (and occasionally humorous) listen and one of the most individual albums of its era. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released September 10, 2013 | Old Green Barn - Sea Gayle Music - Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released September 21, 1998 | A&M Records

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Rock - Released April 21, 2017 | Wylie Songs - Warner Bros.

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Sheryl Crow's country makeover Feels Like Home didn't click commercially in 2013, so she decided to radically shift directions for this 2017 successor, Be Myself. The title alone is a tacit admission that she's returning to her roots, reuniting with producers Jeff Trott and Tchad Blake, the pair who helmed 1996's Sheryl Crow and 1998's The Globe Sessions. Crow last worked with Trott on 2002's C'mon, C'mon, and Be Myself deliberately mirrors that album's sunny vibe while also nodding at specific songs from Crow's past. "Roller Skate" grooves to a beat that echoes "All I Want to Do" and "Strangers Again" struts like "If It Makes You Happy" -- sly winks that acknowledge Crow is happy to embrace her past. Perhaps this retro move would seem desperate if Crow didn't seem so enthusiastic reviving this collaboration. With Trott and Blake in tow, she's happy to embrace her eccentricity in addition to her fondness for big pop hooks -- a combination that fuels Be Myself as surely as it did Sheryl Crow or The Globe Sessions. Compared to those two '90s records, this 2017 album isn't quite as daring -- a revival is by definition a safe bet, plus Crow's long since reined in her purple prose -- but one of the charms of Be Myself is what lies along the fringe. Most of the record's 11 songs are graced by provocative sounds lurking at the margins of the mix -- something that sounds like a music box on "Halfway There," a saloon piano on "Rest of Me," all the compressed guitars as percussion -- that help elevate this set of strong, sophisticated pop into something special. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | A&M

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Pop - Released January 1, 1993 | A&M

Sheryl Crow earned her recording contract through hard work, gigging as a backing vocalist for everyone from Don Henley to Michael Jackson before entering the studio with Hugh Padgham to record her debut album. As it turned out, things didn't go entirely as planned. Instead of adhering to her rock & roll roots, the record was a slick set of contemporary pop, relying heavily on ballads. Upon hearing the completed album, Crow convinced A&M not to release the album, choosing to cut a new record with producer Bill Bottrell. Along with several Los Angeles-based songwriters and producers, including David Baerwald, David Ricketts, and Brian McLeod, Bottrell was part of a collective dubbed "the Tuesday Night Music Club." Every Tuesday, the group would get together, drink beer, jam, and write songs. Crow became part of the Club and, within a few months, she decided to craft her debut album around the songs and spirit of the collective. It was, for the most part, an inspired idea, since Tuesday Night Music Club has a loose, ramshackle charm that her unreleased debut lacked. At its best -- the opening quartet of "Run, Baby, Run," "Leaving Las Vegas," "Strong Enough," and "Can't Cry Anymore," plus the deceptively infectious "All I Wanna Do" -- are remarkable testaments to their collaboration, proving that roots rock can sound contemporary and have humor. That same spirit, however, also resulted in some half-finished songs, and the preponderance of those tracks make Tuesday Night Music Club better in memory than it is in practice. Still, even with the weaker moments, Crow manages to create an identity for herself -- a classic rocker at heart but with enough smarts to stay contemporary. And that's the lasting impression Tuesday Night Music Club leaves. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | A&M

Sheryl Crow earned her recording contract through hard work, gigging as a backing vocalist for everyone from Don Henley to Michael Jackson before entering the studio with Hugh Padgham to record her debut album. As it turned out, things didn't go entirely as planned. Instead of adhering to her rock & roll roots, the record was a slick set of contemporary pop, relying heavily on ballads. Upon hearing the completed album, Crow convinced A&M not to release the album, choosing to cut a new record with producer Bill Bottrell. Along with several Los Angeles-based songwriters and producers, including David Baerwald, David Ricketts, and Brian McLeod, Bottrell was part of a collective dubbed "the Tuesday Night Music Club." Every Tuesday, the group would get together, drink beer, jam, and write songs. Crow became part of the Club and, within a few months, she decided to craft her debut album around the songs and spirit of the collective. It was, for the most part, an inspired idea, since Tuesday Night Music Club has a loose, ramshackle charm that her unreleased debut lacked. At its best -- the opening quartet of "Run, Baby, Run," "Leaving Las Vegas," "Strong Enough," and "Can't Cry Anymore," plus the deceptively infectious "All I Wanna Do" -- are remarkable testaments to their collaboration, proving that roots rock can sound contemporary and have humor. That same spirit, however, also resulted in some half-finished songs, and the preponderance of those tracks make Tuesday Night Music Club better in memory than it is in practice. Still, even with the weaker moments, Crow manages to create an identity for herself -- a classic rocker at heart but with enough smarts to stay contemporary. And that's the lasting impression Tuesday Night Music Club leaves. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | A&M

Booklet
Originally released as a Hallmark exclusive for the holiday season of 2008, Home for Christmas was expanded by a single cut for its exclusive 2010 for Target: “Long Road Home,” taken from Sheryl Crow’s fine 2010 tribute to Southern soul, 100 Miles from Memphis. This may be a secular tune, but it fits snugly next to the rest of Home for Christmas, as that holiday record was designed as a slow, soulful stroll through seasonal classics, Crow turning in excellent versions of tunes as diverse as “Go Tell It on the Mountain,” “The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire),” and “I’ll Be Home for Christmas.” Crow doesn’t necessarily reinvent these songs -- “Merry Christmas Baby” is taken at a slightly faster gait than usual, “White Christmas” grooves like classic Stax -- but she does inhabit them and her band is tight and dexterous, giving this Christmas album some unexpected and welcome soul. It’s a good enough holiday album that it shouldn’t be thought of as a thrown-off exclusive: it’s one of the better pop Christmas records of the last half of the 2000s. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Universal Music

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Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | Universal Music S.A.

Sheryl Crow was one of the key artists of the '90s, if the yardstick is capturing the sound and spirit of the time. A former backing vocalist for Michael Jackson -- an association that led to dubious tabloid headlines romantically linking her with the singer long before she was a star in her own right -- she rode the first great wave of Women in Rock hysteria of the alt-rock explosion to fame with her first album, Tuesday Night Music Club, in 1994, settling into the weary aftermath of the post-grunge years with her brilliant eponymous second album in 1996, riding out the end years of the Clinton administration with the measured, mature Globe Sessions in 1998, and then defying the gloom of the W years by soaking up the sun on 2002's C'mon C'mon. It was a body of work that defined the times without getting too much critical respect (similar to Billy Joel in that respect, even if the music is totally dissimilar), and while her albums were always good and occasionally terrific, she made her greatest mark as a singles artist on the ever-morphing world of '90s radio. Released in late 2003, The Very Best of Sheryl Crow is the first attempt to summarize those years, and it does a pretty good job of it. All of the big hits are here: the deceptively effervescent "All I Wanna Do," the defiantly effervescent "Soak Up the Sun," the sweet resignation of "My Favorite Mistake," the giddy "Everyday Is a Winding Road," the evocative "Leaving Las Vegas," the sexily exhausted "If It Makes You Happy," the soccer-mom anthem "A Change Would Do You Good," the absurd escapism of the heavily Pro Tooled "Steve McQueen," and best of all, "Picture," a superb country duet with Kid Rock previously unavailable on any of Crow's albums. If the collection seems to be missing songs, it's because it is. Like most contemporary hits collection, it chooses to highlight album tracks ("Home," "The Difficult Kind," "I Shall Believe") in lieu of minor hits -- a tactic that is highly debatable, since those album tracks may be favorites of the artist or the concert-attending audience yet those who follow an artist via the radio will find many songs absent, some more noteworthy than others. In this case, "Run Baby Run," "Can't Cry Anymore," "D'yer Mak'er," "Anything but Down," "Sweet Child O Mine," and "C'Mon C'Mon" are all missing in action, with "Can't Cry Anymore," "Anything but Down," and maybe "Run Baby Run" being truly missed (the covers of Zeppelin and Guns N' Roses being the byproduct of the '90s pop climate where major and minor artists alike had more contributions to soundtracks, benefit albums, and tribute records than could be counted; some hit the charts, as in this case, but most didn't). This is a minor quibble, since it effects the general texture and feel of the album more than the overall effect, but it's enough to keep it from being the unqualified home run that it should have been. Even so, The Very Best of Sheryl Crow does capture her biggest and best songs, adding two good new songs to the mix (a cover of Cat Stevens' "The First Cut Is the Deepest," which uses Rod Stewart's version as the starting point, and the solid new song "Light in Your Eyes"), that in turn capture the feel of the '90s by proxy. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | A&M

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Pop - Released January 1, 2005 | A&M

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Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | A&M

The title and sound of 100 Miles from Memphis can’t help but recall Dusty in Memphis, Dusty Springfield’s 1969 blue-eyed soul classic, but Sheryl Crow’s 2010 album isn’t quite a strict homage to Dusty. Crow draws from many of the same ‘60s sources as Springfield, but she also dabbles in reggae (thanks to the chunky guitar of Keith Richards on “Eye to Eye”) and digs into the cool, seductive ‘70s groove of Hi, channeling Al Green on a sleek reworking of Terence Trent D’Arby’s “Sign Your Name,” complete with support from Justin Timberlake. Add to this the extended funk coda of “Roses and Moonlight,” the hippie singalong of “Long Road Home” and one of Crow’s signature good-time social-conscious raising anthems in “Say What You Want” and 100 Miles from Memphis boasts a considerably more expansive palette than Dusty in Memphis, yet it’s all bonded by its smooth, soulful groove due in part to the co-production from Doyle Bramhall II and Justin Stanley. This pair gives 100 Miles a sound that’s recognizably Southern yet has a distinctly sunny vibe not too far removed from Crow’s sun-kissed debut Tuesday Night Music Club, of which this shares a similar spirit, if not sensibility. Tuesday Night Music Club is loose and open where this is focused and sustained, maintaining its charming, relaxed groove from beginning to end. There’s an ease to this record that’s not often heard on Sheryl Crow’s albums and its light touch is thoroughly appealing. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released April 21, 2017 | Wylie Songs - Warner Bros.

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Pop - Released March 31, 2002 | A&M Records Ltd.

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Pop - Released January 1, 2005 | Universal Music Division Polydor

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Country - Released March 12, 2013 | Warner Bros.

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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Spectrum's Every Day Is a Winding Road: The Collection is a good and generous collection of Sheryl Crow's biggest hits, heavily favoring her '90s standards -- "All I Wanna Do,' "A Change Would Do You Good," "Every Day Is a Winding Road," "If It Makes You Happy" -- but featuring some good latter-day cuts like "Riverwide," all adding up to an entertaining overview of Crow's peaks. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released September 10, 2013 | Old Green Barn - Sea Gayle Music - Warner Bros.

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Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | A&M