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Reggae - Released July 11, 1995 | Virgin Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Boombastic confirmed Shaggy's status as one of the most popular dancehall acts of the '90s, and for good reason -- the record is an infectiously entertaining collection of deep, funky grooves that celebrates good times. Featuring the major hit title track, the album also sports a great guest appearance by Grand Puba on "Why You Treat Me So Bad," as well as a hot duet with singer Wayne Wonder on "Something Different." Despite a silly cover of "Day Oh," Boombastic keeps the funky reggae coming and is Shaggy's best album to date. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Geffen

Released the same year as Virgin's The Best of Shaggy, Universal's The Boombastic Collection contains all the hits missing from its competition including the big one-two punch of "It Wasn't Me" and "Church Heathen." The earlier singles "Boombastic" and "Oh Carolina," plus the electronically pumped cover of "In the Summertime," have carried over from the Virgin set, meaning that when it comes to massively important Shaggy numbers, this one is only missing "That Girl." The great sequencing of this compilation almost makes up for it and while this disc is packed at 18 tracks long, this is high caliber dancehall the whole way through and varied enough to keep things interesting. Following the singer from the '80s electro dancehall sound to the R&B-injected reggae of 2008 with all the flavors in between, The Boombastic Collection is a near perfect representation of Shaggy's career and a great argument that he's reggae's most popular crossover artist since Bob Marley. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 10, 2020 | Universal Music Division Polydor

"‘It Wasn’t Me’ is interspersed with hand claps and EDM-ish vocal pitch shifts, while there’s a dubstep breakdown on ‘Boombastic’..." © TiVo
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Pop - Released October 29, 2002 | Geffen

Both commercially and creatively, Hot Shot was a tough act to follow. That 2000 release boasted some of Shaggy's best work (including the naughty smash "It Wasn't Me"), and it sold an impressive ten million units internationally. So when the time came to record a follow-up, Shaggy no doubt felt the sort of pressure that Janet Jackson felt when she recorded a follow-up to Control. This October 2002 release is Shaggy's first album of new material since Hot Shot, although MCA did release an album of Shaggy remixes in early 2002. And even though Lucky Day isn't quite in a class with Hot Shot, it is still an enjoyable follow-up. The album is full of the type of congenial, good-natured crossover dancehall that Shaggy is best known for; those who don't mind the fact that Shaggy is very much a crossover artist won't be disappointed to learn that infectious ditties like "Get My Party On" (which boasts a cameo by guest Chaka Khan) and "Shake Shake Shake" have a lot of pop and urban contemporary appeal. But Lucky Day doesn't come across as formulaic, and Shaggy -- for all his commercial moves -- isn't afraid to offer some surprises. "Hey Sexy Lady" successfully fuses dancehall and funk with Spanish flamenco; it's an unlikely combination, but one that works. And Shaggy, who specializes in lighthearted fun, brings a surprisingly serious tone to "Lost" (a warning against the dangers of crime and street life) and "Walking in My Shoes" (which is about persevering despite challenges and adversity). Although not Shaggy's most essential album, Lucky Day is a rewarding effort that takes its share of chances -- both musically and lyrically. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Reggae - Released November 20, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Pop - Released August 8, 2000 | Geffen

Shaggy's fourth album is a classic hybrid of reggae, R&B, and pop. Following duets with Maxi Priest ("That Girl") and Janet Jackson ("Luv Me, Luv Me"), the Jamaica native teams up with master producers Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis and a myriad of talented guest vocalists who complement his personality on each track. Coming with the minor hit "Hope" from 1999's For Love of the Game soundtrack, the first couple of singles, "Dance and Shout" (featuring a Michael Jackson sample) and "It Wasn't Me," show the strengths of this album -- they are smart, warm, and playful. Shaggy's persona is hard to not like. On "It Wasn't Me," a friend laments being caught by his girl with another woman; Shaggy continually advises him to flatly deny it. To be able to use that sentiment and still seem likable is a gift. There are such heavy samples, some of the tracks almost sound like remakes at points, but there is such originality and gifted wordplay that the combination works as opposed to seeming unoriginal -- something most rappers can't seem to accomplish. Each song on Hot Shot from the opening title track on is different, inviting, and infectious. © Bryan Buss /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 10, 2020 | Universal Music Division Polydor

"‘It Wasn’t Me’ is interspersed with hand claps and EDM-ish vocal pitch shifts, while there’s a dubstep breakdown on ‘Boombastic’..." © TiVo
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Pop - Released May 9, 2019 | Universal Music Division Polydor

This 13th solo studio album from the Jamaican dancehall star, his first in six years, follows his 2018 collaborative effort with Sting, 44/876. Providing fans with another dose of his happy-go-lucky, sexual, larger-than-life persona, he collaborates here with a variety of guest stars including Gene Noble, Alexander Stewart, and Nyanda. The singles "Use Me" and "You" are included. © John D. Buchanan /TiVo
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Reggae - Released January 1, 2008 | Virgin Records

Like all the Shaggy compilations before it, Virgin's 2008 collection fails to deliver what would be the dream comp, one that puts early hits like "Boombastic" and "Oh Carolina" next to later ones like "It Wasn't Me" and "Church Heathen." Until the day the record labels the dancehall superstar has been with play nice, Best Of is a worthy recommendation. The previously mentioned early cuts are included alongside the Maxi Priest duet "That Girl" and the underappreciated "Why You Treat Me So Bad" single. Entertaining cover versions of "In the Summertime" and "Piece of My Heart" seal the deal, while well-chosen album cuts provide the B+ filler. Know that what you're really getting is The Best of the Virgin Years and this set doesn't disappoint. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Reggae - Released January 1, 2012 | Virgin Budget

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Pop - Released September 28, 2012 | Embassy of Music

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Pop - Released May 10, 2019 | Universal Music Division Polydor

This 13th solo studio album from the Jamaican dancehall star, his first in six years, follows his 2018 collaborative effort with Sting, 44/876. Providing fans with another dose of his happy-go-lucky, sexual, larger-than-life persona, he collaborates here with a variety of guest stars including Gene Noble, Alexander Stewart, and Nyanda. The singles "Use Me" and "You" are included. © John D. Buchanan /TiVo
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Dancehall - Released December 16, 2014 | Ranch Entertainment, Inc.

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Reggae - Released March 16, 2009 | VP Records

Shaggy's 2005 effort Clothes Drop was widely ignored in the States and only semi-accepted in the U.K. and Europe. In Jamaica and Japan, however, the album had serious legs, carrying the dancehall singer's career all the way to 2007 and the release of the "Church Heathen" single. Seeing as how his most supportive territories were Jamaica -- the home of it all -- and Japan -- where they'll take their dancehall straight, no R&B chaser required -- it made perfect sense for Shaggy to deliver a JA flavored tune featuring Jamaican Patois and references for the dancehall literate. That tune, "Church Heathen," took the dancehall world by storm, re-established the singer's footing in the U.K., and began to make an impact in the States towards the end of the 2007. That the U.S. would even pay attention is the biggest surprise since insider lyrics like "She a do the dutty dance to the Matterhorn song/And a say she get the ting them from Baby Cham" are hardly the stuff of "It Wasn't Me" or even his breakthrough hit "Oh Carolina." Still, the single has a riddim that's infectious, a Gregorian chant inspired chorus that's very clever, plus Shaggy in top form, pointing out all the pious church-goers he deals with back home with his usual crafty slang and humor. While the album his worldwide comeback hit lands on isn't totally without its crossover material -- "What's Love" with Akon being the best example -- Shaggy is more discerning than ever and makes sure the radio-friendly material is right in line with his skill set. The breezy "Bonafide Girl" with Rik Rok brings welcome reminders of their "It Wasn't Me" interplay, and while "Out of Control" could have come straight from the house of Jermaine Dupri, it's R&B-meets-dancehall stance feels natural, not forced. Even better are the tracks that fall firmly in the dancehall category. Besides the glorious "Heathen" there's the opening "Can't Hold Me," which finds the gruff vocalist working his quick delivery over a wonderfully crooked ragga beat. Conscious reggae, Sizzla, Shaggy, and Collie Buddz all make "Mad Mad World" a standout while "Wear di Crown" with Mischieve boldly declares itself "Big Yard Music" at the start and then delivers. With Intoxication, Shaggy has once again found that perfect balance of slick and streetwise, and added career-defining single number three as the cherry on top. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Reggae - Released January 1, 2002 | Virgin Records

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Pop - Released December 22, 2014 | RED MUSIC - Sony Music Entertainment

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Pop - Released March 11, 2015 | Brooklyn Knights - RED MUSIC - Sony Music Entertainment

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Reggae - Released May 3, 2019 | 300 Entertainment

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Pop - Released November 21, 2018 | 300 Entertainment

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Progressive Rock - Released March 12, 2020 | Cult Rock Classics