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Punk / New Wave - Released January 1, 2012 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
While mostly accurate, dismissing Never Mind the Bollocks as merely a series of loud, ragged midtempo rockers with a harsh, grating vocalist and not much melody would be a terrible error. Already anthemic songs are rendered positively transcendent by Johnny Rotten's rabid, foaming delivery. His bitterly sarcastic attacks on pretentious affectation and the very foundations of British society were all carried out in the most confrontational, impolite manner possible. Most imitators of the Pistols' angry nihilism missed the point: underneath the shock tactics and theatrical negativity were social critiques carefully designed for maximum impact. Never Mind the Bollocks perfectly articulated the frustration, rage, and dissatisfaction of the British working class with the establishment, a spirit quick to translate itself to strictly rock & roll terms. The Pistols paved the way for countless other bands to make similarly rebellious statements, but arguably none were as daring or effective. It's easy to see how the band's roaring energy, overwhelmingly snotty attitude, and Rotten's furious ranting sparked a musical revolution, and those qualities haven't diminished one bit over time. Never Mind the Bollocks is simply one of the greatest, most inspiring rock records of all time. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Punk / New Wave - Released January 1, 2012 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
While mostly accurate, dismissing Never Mind the Bollocks as merely a series of loud, ragged midtempo rockers with a harsh, grating vocalist and not much melody would be a terrible error. Already anthemic songs are rendered positively transcendent by Johnny Rotten's rabid, foaming delivery. His bitterly sarcastic attacks on pretentious affectation and the very foundations of British society were all carried out in the most confrontational, impolite manner possible. Most imitators of the Pistols' angry nihilism missed the point: underneath the shock tactics and theatrical negativity were social critiques carefully designed for maximum impact. Never Mind the Bollocks perfectly articulated the frustration, rage, and dissatisfaction of the British working class with the establishment, a spirit quick to translate itself to strictly rock & roll terms. The Pistols paved the way for countless other bands to make similarly rebellious statements, but arguably none were as daring or effective. It's easy to see how the band's roaring energy, overwhelmingly snotty attitude, and Rotten's furious ranting sparked a musical revolution, and those qualities haven't diminished one bit over time. Never Mind the Bollocks is simply one of the greatest, most inspiring rock records of all time. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Punk / New Wave - Released January 1, 2012 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

When first approaching The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle, it's best not to think of it as a Sex Pistols album; rather, keep in mind that it's the soundtrack to a movie that was mostly about Malcolm McLaren and only tangentially concerned the great band he managed. Only eight of the twenty-four songs on The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle feature the same band as on Never Mind the Bollocks, and most of those capture them stomping through covers in the studio, sometimes to impressive effect (Johnny Rotten sounds positively feral on the Who's "Substitute" and the whole band tears into "(I'm Not Your) Stepping Stone" with malicious glee) and sometimes not (Rotten reveals he doesn't know the words to either Chuck Berry's "Johnny B. Goode" or Jonathan Richman's "Roadrunner," and the band's familiarity isn't much greater). A live take of the Pistols roaring through "Belsen Was a Gas" is exciting, but sounds as if Rotten and the rest of the band were traveling in very different directions, and it's not hard to imagine why he quit the group after the show. Steve Jones and Paul Cook offer up a few tunes of their own, which lack the danger of the cuts with Rotten but confirm they were the backbone of a solid, scrappy rock band, and if Tenpole Tudor isn't much of a singer, on his numbers he delivers an impressive degree of sheer eccentricity. But a large percentage of the album is devoted to jokey material tied into the movie -- orchestral versions of "EMI" and "God Save the Queen," a French busker performing "Anarchy in the UK" en Français, train robber Ronnie Biggs attempting to sing, and Malcolm McLaren ascending to show biz heaven with a cover of Max Bygraves' "You Need Hands." And while Sid Vicious sounds like a good if unexceptional rock & roll shouter on a pair of Eddie Cochran covers, his inarguably remarkable version of "My Way" shows the man was incapable of comprehending the irony of his situation, and sadly sounds like the work of a kid destined to die young. Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols was the sound of a hydrogen bomb being dropped on your head, and The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle collects some of the debris left after the explosion; parts are brilliant, but it's ultimately a padded and slightly depressing look at a great band in collapse. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Punk / New Wave - Released October 28, 1977 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

While mostly accurate, dismissing Never Mind the Bollocks as merely a series of loud, ragged midtempo rockers with a harsh, grating vocalist and not much melody would be a terrible error. Already anthemic songs are rendered positively transcendent by Johnny Rotten's rabid, foaming delivery. His bitterly sarcastic attacks on pretentious affectation and the very foundations of British society were all carried out in the most confrontational, impolite manner possible. Most imitators of the Pistols' angry nihilism missed the point: underneath the shock tactics and theatrical negativity were social critiques carefully designed for maximum impact. Never Mind the Bollocks perfectly articulated the frustration, rage, and dissatisfaction of the British working class with the establishment, a spirit quick to translate itself to strictly rock & roll terms. The Pistols paved the way for countless other bands to make similarly rebellious statements, but arguably none were as daring or effective. It's easy to see how the band's roaring energy, overwhelmingly snotty attitude, and Rotten's furious ranting sparked a musical revolution, and those qualities haven't diminished one bit over time. Never Mind the Bollocks is simply one of the greatest, most inspiring rock records of all time. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1977 | Sanctuary Records

In the fall of 1977, the Sex Pistols were the most infamous rock band in the U.K., beloved by rock & roll upstarts for their stripped-down, angry sound and outlaw attitude, while they were also hated by people who disliked their open disrespect for authority, hygiene, the Royal Family, and the accepted rules of British show business. The Sex Pistols were soon to release their wildly anticipated first album, Never Mind the Bollocks Here's the Sex Pistols, when a mysterious bootleg, Spunk, appeared in hipper record shops. As it happened, Spunk collected the original demo recordings of the Sex Pistols' best-known songs, as recorded by their soundman Dave Goodman and featuring original bassist Glen Matlock before he was sacked in favor of Sid Vicious. While the Pistols' label, Virgin Records, quickly jumped in to halt distribution of Spunk, the bootleg soon gained a reputation as a classic punk artifact, capturing the Sex Pistols in raw but powerful form. Years after the fact, Spunk was given an authorized release (the same material also appeared on a semi-legit album titled No Future UK?), and while the album lacks the focus and clarity of Never Mind the Bollocks, without the many layers of guitar overdubs that buffered the official recordings, Spunk certainly has a certain breathless energy and spontaneity that comes closer to the impact of their explosive live shows (and given that most live Sex Pistols bootlegs from their original run sound abysmal, the rough but very listenable audio of these tracks is a welcome alternative). Never Mind the Bollocks is the definitive Sex Pistols effort, but Spunk is a more than worthy supplement, a rough draft that catches a few important virtues that were blurred in the final edit. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1996 | Virgin

As the cliche says, the Sex Pistols were the last band anyone expected to see reunite. However, those observers were ignoring just how alluring the promise of easy money is to a band that never earned that much in the first place, so the Sex Pistols did what was previously unthinkable and reunited in 1996 for a summer-long tour of Europe and the United States. After playing two warm-up gigs, the band played their first official live concert at Finsbury Park in early June and the result is presented on Filthy Lucre Live, which was released just a matter of weeks after the concert. Two things about the reunited Pistols are clear from the outset -- they can play their instruments and they sound much heavier and less revolutionary than expected; in fact, the band doesn't sound very punk at all -- they sound like a professional hard rock band. But -- and this is the most surprising thing -- they sound fun. If you're a fan, it's hard to deny that it's fun to hear a live performance by the Pistols that doesn't degenerate into chaos and is recorded in clean audio. You can't call Filthy Lucre Live punk rock by any stretch of the imagination, but it is first-rate nostalgia, even if punk was about eliminating the need for records just like this one. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1989 | Castle Communications

Yet another half-official release of Sex Pistols material. This release from Castle combines two non-essential releases. Released in 2002. © Chris True /TiVo
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Punk / New Wave - Released November 11, 2012 | Carter Lane - OMiP

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Rock - Released January 12, 2015 | Trashy Pop

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Rock - Released August 22, 2019 | 3 Amigos

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Punk / New Wave - Released June 3, 2016 | iOcean Music

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Punk / New Wave - Released August 19, 2016 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Contemporary Jazz - Released February 29, 2012 | Best Buy Music

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Punk / New Wave - Released October 1, 2011 | ICENI

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Rock - Released October 11, 2010 | Landmark (Entertain Me Ltd)

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Punk / New Wave - Released October 1, 2012 | Firefly Entertainment

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Punk / New Wave - Released August 1, 2012 | Vantage Music

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Punk / New Wave - Released October 19, 2009 | Lumi OMP

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Punk / New Wave - Released January 2, 2013 | Supreme Media

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Punk / New Wave - Released January 1, 2012 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)