Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD£12.49

Pop - Released March 31, 2015 | Universal Music International Ltda.

Distinctions Sélection JAZZ NEWS
CD£7.99

Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 6, 2020 | Night Dreamer

Seu Jorge is well known for his covers of David Bowie songs for the now-cult Wes Anderson film The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, but we are less familiar with Rogê, another Carioca singer, the artist behind seven albums and an expert in samba-funk. Friends for 25 years, the two had never recorded anything together until August 2019 when they made this album in a Dutch studio, with rather unique conditions: recorded in two days with one live take, it was recorded directly on vinyl, without any post-production. This is the concept and mission statement of the London/Haarlem label Night Dreamer and all their direct-to-disc recordings. And when the skill is mastered, it’s marvellous. It’s as if Seu Jorge and Rogê were playing these seven tracks one summer’s evening, on an oceanside veranda. The mood is relaxed, the guitars play softly alongside some light percussion, and the two voices (one very deep and one slightly higher) interlock with perfect harmony, producing a feeling of simplicity and intimacy that is rarely heard on recordings. This is music to celebrate friendship, made more brilliant by the lack of production and commercial intentions. Seu Jorge and Rogê play as the artisan creators of samba-bossa would have done over 60 years ago, before this music became a worldwide phenomenon and in some places, slightly cliché. Touched by the beauty of the moment, this album is a wonderful massage for the eardrums and a sure classic of Brazilian music. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz

Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released June 29, 2010 | Now Again Records

Download not available
CD£5.59

Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 30, 2014 | Mr Bongo

CD£13.49

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2005 | Hollywood Records

Raised in the slums of Rio, Brazil, singer/songwriter Seu Jorge used his formidable talent and undeniable charm to great effect in director Wes Anderson's seafaring comedy the Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou as a guitar strumming deckhand. The catch was that Pelé dos Santos only knew how to play Portuguese versions of David Bowie tunes, all 13 of which are featured on Hollywood's Life Aquatic Studio Sessions. Jorge possesses a voice that exudes the same regional comfort as fellow countrymen Milton Nascimento and Caetano Veloso, and his warm and loose guitar playing matches his timbre, resulting in a batch of covers that retain the original framing of the Bowie classics, while injecting a sunny island sweetness into their very core. While the very idea reeks of kitsch, the end product is surprisingly poignant and agreeable. Even the Thin White Duke himself seems taken with the idea, as he states in Aquatic's liner notes that "Had Seu Jorge not recorded my songs acoustically in Portuguese I would never had heard this new level of beauty which he has imbued them with." © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
CD£11.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | EMI

América Brasil, the fourth album by Brazilian singer/songwriter and actor Seu Jorge, is his first to be comprised almost entirely of his own songs and carries some thematic weight. Jorge's first two albums, Samba Esporte Fino (2001) and Cru (2004), were half-comprised of covers while his third, The Life Aquatic Studio Sessions (2005), was entirely comprised of covers. Granted, the cover material on these albums was generally arranged in a creative fashion and is a testament to Jorge's cleverness as a musical artist. Yet the best songs ("Carolina," "Tive Razão") are the ones written by Jorge himself, and so as a discerning listener it's easy to crave more of his own songs rather than all the covers, especially in the case of The Life Aquatic Studio Sessions, which is great for what it is -- an album of left-field David Bowie covers -- but doesn't reward repeated listening. Those listeners who crave a showcase for Jorge the songwriter rather than Jorge the interpreter have it here. América Brasil is not only a showcase of self-penned compositions but is also a thematic song cycle about the relationship between Brazil and America. The ambitions of América Brasil extend beyond the lyrics to the music, which is varied in style and instrumentation from one song to the next, all but one clocking past the four-minute mark and a few in the range of seven minutes each. As on past albums, Jorge kicks off América Brasil with a rousing standout ("América do Norte") and follows through with a couple more upbeat standouts ("Trabalhador," "Burguesinha") before he shifts gears with the spare "Cuidar de Mim," the epic "Mina do Condominio," and a breezy bossa nova, "Mariana." Amid this varied array of songs that succeed the excellent opening run, "Samba Rock" stands out, along with the aforementioned "Mina do Condominio." Despite the appeal of several songs and the intrigue of the album's overarching ambitions, however, América Brasil isn't as easily enjoyable as Samba Esporte Fino and Cru. The consistently long running times of the songs sometimes can be a drag, and the thematic weight of the lyrics sometimes overshadows the sense of fun that characterizes previous albums, in particular the feel-good vibes of Samba Esporte Fino. All the same, América Brasil is an impressive album, one sure to engage longtime fans who admire Jorge as a songwriter. Anyone looking for a more substantial effort from Jorge than usual -- such as those listeners who might have grumbled about the Bowie covers album as being lightweight -- will find plenty to consider here. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
CD£4.79

World - Released October 7, 2016 | Heaven And Earth Music

CD£5.59

World - Released January 1, 2002 | Mr Bongo

After making his recording debut on Farofa Carioca's Moro No Brasil (1997), Seu Jorge left the band and embarked on a solo recording career that commenced with Samba Esporte Fino (2001), his full-length album debut (released internationally in 2002 as Carolina). The best of both worlds, the album's style of samba-funk is thoroughly modern, particularly in terms of its vibrant production, yet still harks back to classic Brazilian samba-funk albums of the 1970s such as Jorge Ben's África Brasil (1976) and Gilberto Gil's Refazenda (1975). The standout opening song, "Carolina," gets the album off to an absolutely rousing start, and the next two songs, "Chega No Suingue" and "Mangueira," are similarly stirring. These first three songs alone make Samba Esporte Fino a compelling debut album: each written by Jorge, they showcase not only his exceptional songwriting skills but also his expressive singing voice and his lively backing band (guitar, bass, drums, percussion, horns, background vocalists). Following the opening run of self-penned songs, Jorge works in a variety of covers, including "Em Nagoya Eu Vi Eriko," a song written by Jorge Ben specifically for inclusion here. Amid these covers, Jorge slots a late-album pair of his own songs, most notably "Funk Baby," a soul-funk gem with a fat bassline and soaring string arrangement. There is a wealth of such highlights on Samba Esporte Fino, an almost entirely upbeat and danceable album that is nonetheless varied in style from one song to the next, musically as well as lyrically. Another plus for the album worth mentioning is the production of Ben in collaboration with Beastie Boys producer Mario Caldato. As aforementioned, it sounds 21st century, particularly the rich basslines and the crisp percussion, yet is still earthy enough to hark back to samba-funk of the 1970s. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
CD£7.99
Cru

World - Released June 8, 2007 | Wrasse Records

CD£7.99

World - Released February 12, 2012 | Wrasse Records

Músicas Para Churrasco is Seu Jorge's idea of a party album. It is a cliché and a national stereotype to say it, but there are very few safer bets than a party album by a Brazilian artist, and Seu Jorge could not possibly disappoint on that matter. From the opening shout of the irresistible single "A Doida" to the smooth closer "Quem Não Quer Sou Eu," this short album turns on the funk, puts the meat on the grill, unloads the beer, and calls on all neighbors and friends to join the barbecue party mentioned in the title. Seu Jorge's characters are typically male rascals from suburban Rio, with a chauvinist mind and a sole preoccupation: women. All of them, a crazy girlfriend, a new neighbor, an exotic Japanese beauty, the wife's best friend, all are a headache and all are fair game. The music may hint here and there at the samba or the pagode -- in the use of cavaquinho or Brazilian percussion instruments -- but the cold fact is that Músicas Para Churrasco is nothing but an unrepentant old-school funk album, of the Brazilian variety. Seu Jorge continues to be obsessed with the 1970s, and this one sounds as if Parliament/Funkadelic went on a vacation south of the Equator, carrying all their horns, monster glasses, and wigs. Fun and brief, it is impossible not to enjoy Músicas Para Churrasco. At the same time, it is also one of Seu Jorge's most boisterous efforts, so it may frustrate listeners expecting the sensitive crooner persona of The Life Aquatic. © Mariano Prunes /TiVo
CD£1.49

Pop - Released March 16, 2018 | Sony Music Entertainment

CD£0.79

World - Released May 9, 2012 | Florida Música

CD£1.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | EMI

CD£7.99

Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released June 30, 2008 | Discos Como No

América Brasil, the fourth album by Brazilian singer/songwriter and actor Seu Jorge, is his first to be comprised almost entirely of his own songs and carries some thematic weight. Jorge's first two albums, Samba Esporte Fino (2001) and Cru (2004), were half-comprised of covers while his third, The Life Aquatic Studio Sessions (2005), was entirely comprised of covers. Granted, the cover material on these albums was generally arranged in a creative fashion and is a testament to Jorge's cleverness as a musical artist. Yet the best songs ("Carolina," "Tive Razão") are the ones written by Jorge himself, and so as a discerning listener it's easy to crave more of his own songs rather than all the covers, especially in the case of The Life Aquatic Studio Sessions, which is great for what it is -- an album of left-field David Bowie covers -- but doesn't reward repeated listening. Those listeners who crave a showcase for Jorge the songwriter rather than Jorge the interpreter have it here. América Brasil is not only a showcase of self-penned compositions but is also a thematic song cycle about the relationship between Brazil and America. The ambitions of América Brasil extend beyond the lyrics to the music, which is varied in style and instrumentation from one song to the next, all but one clocking past the four-minute mark and a few in the range of seven minutes each. As on past albums, Jorge kicks off América Brasil with a rousing standout ("América do Norte") and follows through with a couple more upbeat standouts ("Trabalhador," "Burguesinha") before he shifts gears with the spare "Cuidar de Mim," the epic "Mina do Condominio," and a breezy bossa nova, "Mariana." Amid this varied array of songs that succeed the excellent opening run, "Samba Rock" stands out, along with the aforementioned "Mina do Condominio." Despite the appeal of several songs and the intrigue of the album's overarching ambitions, however, América Brasil isn't as easily enjoyable as Samba Esporte Fino and Cru. The consistently long running times of the songs sometimes can be a drag, and the thematic weight of the lyrics sometimes overshadows the sense of fun that characterizes previous albums, in particular the feel-good vibes of Samba Esporte Fino. All the same, América Brasil is an impressive album, one sure to engage longtime fans who admire Jorge as a songwriter. Anyone looking for a more substantial effort from Jorge than usual -- such as those listeners who might have grumbled about the Bowie covers album as being lightweight -- will find plenty to consider here. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo

Artist

Seu Jorge in the magazine
  • Must Listen: Seu Jorge & Rogê
    Must Listen: Seu Jorge & Rogê The Brazilian duo release their Direct-To-Disc album on British/Dutch label Night Dreamer, with near-perfect results. The ultimate in chill samba-bossa...