Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES£18.99
CD£13.49

Pop - Released October 30, 2020 | CAPITOL

Hi-Res
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Sam Smith delayed, reworked, and retitled their third album, originally planned for release in May 2020. Love Goes landed that October, and in somewhat anticlimactic fashion appends as bonus tracks most of the lead-up singles, spanning a period of well over two years, careening from the free and easy disco-house of "Promises" to the muddled arena pop of "I'm Ready." Another throw-in is the intended title track. Relegated as it is, "To Die For" -- a gentle piano ballad with Smith longing for idyllic companionship as they gaze at their "solo shadow on a sidewalk" -- fits with the album proper, drawn from the singer's first real-life heartbreak. The connection Smith makes with it and the surrounding material here doesn't sound any tighter than it did on In the Lonely Hour or The Thrill of It All, but that's less a criticism than a credit to them as a consistent performer. Smith previously had no trouble expressing romantic torment, and that continues throughout the reliably low-spirited and highly-expressive Love Goes. One divergence from the previous albums is in the way Smith handles separation, almost bursting with regret on the lean "Forgive Myself," reminiscing with fondness on "For the Lover That I Lost," and extending benevolent acceptance in the pulsing and swirling "Another One," containing one of their most nuanced and appealing vocals. Smith elsewhere romanticizes recklessness in the a cappella opener "Young" and the doubly wistful send-off "Kids Again," but contrary to those visions of cutting loose, there's little evident taking of risks from a creative standpoint. Made with staunch collaborators Jimmy Napes, Stargate, and Disclosure's Guy Lawrence, and a mix of other high-profile songwriters and producers expected to deliver hits, the album is all tightly hemmed and neatly pressed. The faintly cosmopolitan dance-pop grooves and finely measured ballads offer few unexpected turns. They're set apart more by a lack of gospel and soul, consequently rendering Love Goes plain by Smith's standard -- unfortunate for an artist whose instrument is anything but that. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
HI-RES£18.99
CD£13.49

Pop - Released February 12, 2021 | CAPITOL

Hi-Res
From
CD£8.99

Pop - Released November 6, 2015 | CAPITOL

Disclosure's loping dance-pop single "Latch," a number 11 U.K. hit in 2012, introduced Sam Smith, a London-born vocalist with a deeply emotive voice. Smith grew up listening to R&B giants Chaka Khan, Luther Vandross, and Whitney Houston, but their first impression was unique, not merely for the richness of their voice, but its resoundingly expressive yet naturally delivered manner -- on a level most singers can't match with maximum effort. Early 2013 brought their debut solo single, "Lay Me Down" -- an aching singer/songwriter-soul throwback that scraped the U.K. Top 50. It was quickly eclipsed by a lead role on Naughty Boy's "La La La," a breakbeat-driven tearjerker that went to number one in the U.K. and then reached the Top 20 in the U.S. "Money on My Mind," an upbeat statement of purpose more about the soul than the heart, and "Stay with Me," a torch song with a gospel-inspired chorus, were Smith's second and third solo singles. They preceded the release of In the Lonely Hour, the singer and songwriter's debut album. Those three solo singles are here, along with seven new songs that tend to cast Smith as a heartbroken balladeer. Deep sorrow informs most of the material. Much more about mourning than movement here, Smith is bold for not attempting to capitalize on the Disclosure and Naughty Boy hits. The dominance of stripped-down backdrops -- some with merely piano, acoustic guitar, and conservative strings -- is somewhat surprising. That puts all the more focus on Smith's voice and words, the latter of which switch between borderline maudlin ("What use is money when you need someone to hold?") and disarmingly brazen ("Just leave your lover, leave him for me"). If Smith didn't have such a remarkable voice, they could stay busy composing songs for artists in several genres; the anthemic "Like I Can" could be easily adapted for a contemporary country singer, while a few others could be turned over to young pop artists in need of material that makes them sound more human. This is an understated and promising first step from an unpredictable and distinctive talent. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
HI-RES£22.49
CD£15.99

Pop - Released November 3, 2017 | CAPITOL

Hi-Res Booklet
Referring to In the Lonely Hour as a massive success would not be hyperbolic. Each one of its four singles reached the Top Ten in Sam Smith's native U.K. As the album racked up multi-platinum certifications, Smith collected four Grammys. The momentum continued with "Writing's on the Wall," the first James Bond theme to top the U.K. chart and subsequently an Oscar winner. Smith's 2017 follow-up arrived a little over three years after the debut. It refines the M.O. of "Stay with Me" and "I'm Not the Only One," as it's stacked from floor to ceiling with ballads, and informed by vintage Southern soul and gospel, all distinguished with Smith's fraught, lump-in-throat outpourings. It wouldn't be a shock to learn that the singer finished each performance by either crawling back to bed or collapsing in the vocal booth. For that, The Thrill of It All -- an album that begins with "You must think that I'm stupid" and lifts in mood rarely and only slightly at that -- is an odd title. ("The Thrill of It All" itself doesn't appear on the album's standard edition, and is another griever, all remorseful pain, no pleasure.) Like "Stay with Me" and "I'm Not the Only One," these songs feature co-production from Jimmy Napes and Steve Fitzmaurice, who typically work in tandem, and in a few instances are assisted by the Dap-Kings Horns and several background vocalists who mitigate the misery. On "Baby, You Make Me Crazy," the horn section helps lend a rare moment of uplift, where Smith delights in thinking of listening to their favorite music to drown out the sorrow. The connections to the South extend to highlight "No Peace," a duet with Arkansas native and poised powerhouse Yebba Smith. More importantly, there's "Him," a moment of admission and proud defiance: "I walk the streets of Mississippi/I hold my lover by the hand/I feel you staring when he is with me." Additional songwriters and producers, including but not limited to Timbaland, Stargate, Emile Haynie, and Malay, contribute to one or two songs each, but this album maintains a consistency and intensity that places it slightly above the debut. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
CD£5.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2014 | CAPITOL

Disclosure's loping dance-pop single "Latch," a number 11 U.K. hit in 2012, introduced Sam Smith, a London-born vocalist with a deeply emotive voice. Smith grew up listening to R&B giants Chaka Khan, Luther Vandross, and Whitney Houston, but their first impression was unique, not merely for the richness of their voice, but its resoundingly expressive yet naturally delivered manner -- on a level most singers can't match with maximum effort. Early 2013 brought their debut solo single, "Lay Me Down" -- an aching singer/songwriter-soul throwback that scraped the U.K. Top 50. It was quickly eclipsed by a lead role on Naughty Boy's "La La La," a breakbeat-driven tearjerker that went to number one in the U.K. and then reached the Top 20 in the U.S. "Money on My Mind," an upbeat statement of purpose more about the soul than the heart, and "Stay with Me," a torch song with a gospel-inspired chorus, were Smith's second and third solo singles. They preceded the release of In the Lonely Hour, the singer and songwriter's debut album. Those three solo singles are here, along with seven new songs that tend to cast Smith as a heartbroken balladeer. Deep sorrow informs most of the material. Much more about mourning than movement here, Smith is bold for not attempting to capitalize on the Disclosure and Naughty Boy hits. The dominance of stripped-down backdrops -- some with merely piano, acoustic guitar, and conservative strings -- is somewhat surprising. That puts all the more focus on Smith's voice and words, the latter of which switch between borderline maudlin ("What use is money when you need someone to hold?") and disarmingly brazen ("Just leave your lover, leave him for me"). If Smith didn't have such a remarkable voice, they could stay busy composing songs for artists in several genres; the anthemic "Like I Can" could be easily adapted for a contemporary country singer, while a few others could be turned over to young pop artists in need of material that makes them sound more human. This is an understated and promising first step from an unpredictable and distinctive talent. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
HI-RES£18.99
CD£13.49

Pop - Released October 30, 2020 | CAPITOL

Hi-Res
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Sam Smith delayed, reworked, and retitled their third album, originally planned for release in May 2020. Love Goes landed that October, and in somewhat anticlimactic fashion appends as bonus tracks most of the lead-up singles, spanning a period of well over two years, careening from the free and easy disco-house of "Promises" to the muddled arena pop of "I'm Ready." Another throw-in is the intended title track. Relegated as it is, "To Die For" -- a gentle piano ballad with Smith longing for idyllic companionship as they gaze at their "solo shadow on a sidewalk" -- fits with the album proper, drawn from the singer's first real-life heartbreak. The connection Smith makes with it and the surrounding material here doesn't sound any tighter than it did on In the Lonely Hour or The Thrill of It All, but that's less a criticism than a credit to them as a consistent performer. Smith previously had no trouble expressing romantic torment, and that continues throughout the reliably low-spirited and highly-expressive Love Goes. One divergence from the previous albums is in the way Smith handles separation, almost bursting with regret on the lean "Forgive Myself," reminiscing with fondness on "For the Lover That I Lost," and extending benevolent acceptance in the pulsing and swirling "Another One," containing one of their most nuanced and appealing vocals. Smith elsewhere romanticizes recklessness in the a cappella opener "Young" and the doubly wistful send-off "Kids Again," but contrary to those visions of cutting loose, there's little evident taking of risks from a creative standpoint. Made with staunch collaborators Jimmy Napes, Stargate, and Disclosure's Guy Lawrence, and a mix of other high-profile songwriters and producers expected to deliver hits, the album is all tightly hemmed and neatly pressed. The faintly cosmopolitan dance-pop grooves and finely measured ballads offer few unexpected turns. They're set apart more by a lack of gospel and soul, consequently rendering Love Goes plain by Smith's standard -- unfortunate for an artist whose instrument is anything but that. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
HI-RES£18.99
CD£13.49

Pop - Released November 3, 2017 | CAPITOL

Hi-Res Booklet
Referring to In the Lonely Hour as a massive success would not be hyperbolic. Each one of its four singles reached the Top Ten in Sam Smith's native U.K. As the album racked up multi-platinum certifications, Smith collected four Grammys. The momentum continued with "Writing's on the Wall," the first James Bond theme to top the U.K. chart and subsequently an Oscar winner. Smith's 2017 follow-up arrived a little over three years after the debut. It refines the M.O. of "Stay with Me" and "I'm Not the Only One," as it's stacked from floor to ceiling with ballads, and informed by vintage Southern soul and gospel, all distinguished with Smith's fraught, lump-in-throat outpourings. It wouldn't be a shock to learn that the singer finished each performance by either crawling back to bed or collapsing in the vocal booth. For that, The Thrill of It All -- an album that begins with "You must think that I'm stupid" and lifts in mood rarely and only slightly at that -- is an odd title. ("The Thrill of It All" itself doesn't appear on the album's standard edition, and is another griever, all remorseful pain, no pleasure.) Like "Stay with Me" and "I'm Not the Only One," these songs feature co-production from Jimmy Napes and Steve Fitzmaurice, who typically work in tandem, and in a few instances are assisted by the Dap-Kings Horns and several background vocalists who mitigate the misery. On "Baby, You Make Me Crazy," the horn section helps lend a rare moment of uplift, where Smith delights in thinking of listening to their favorite music to drown out the sorrow. The connections to the South extend to highlight "No Peace," a duet with Arkansas native and poised powerhouse Yebba Smith. More importantly, there's "Him," a moment of admission and proud defiance: "I walk the streets of Mississippi/I hold my lover by the hand/I feel you staring when he is with me." Additional songwriters and producers, including but not limited to Timbaland, Stargate, Emile Haynie, and Malay, contribute to one or two songs each, but this album maintains a consistency and intensity that places it slightly above the debut. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
CD£1.49

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | CAPITOL

From
CD£1.49

Pop - Released January 11, 2019 | CAPITOL

From
HI-RES£2.49
CD£1.49

Pop - Released September 17, 2020 | CAPITOL

Hi-Res

Pop - Released August 14, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

Download not available
From
CD£1.49

Pop - Released December 21, 2018 | CAPITOL

Pop - Released July 24, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

Download not available
From
CD£1.49

Pop - Released February 15, 2019 | CAPITOL

From
CD£1.49

Pop - Released July 19, 2019 | CAPITOL

Pop - Released February 26, 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

Download not available
From
HI-RES£2.49
CD£1.49

Pop - Released November 20, 2020 | CAPITOL

Hi-Res

Pop - Released July 17, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

Download not available
From
CD£1.49

Pop - Released November 1, 2019 | CAPITOL

From
HI-RES£2.49
CD£1.49

Pop - Released April 16, 2020 | CAPITOL

Hi-Res

Artist

Sam Smith in the magazine
  • Media Round-Up / Thursday 8th October 2015
    Media Round-Up / Thursday 8th October 2015 Indiscretions, secrets, readings, revelations, and news: our Round-Up highlights the most important musical stories of the week. Truth is always good to read, right?
  • Soulful Sam Smith
    Soulful Sam Smith He’s already had his breakthrough following two No. 1 singles and collaborations with fellow Brit producers Naughty Boy and Disclosure, not to mention a recent appearance on ‘Saturday Night Live’… ...