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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 13, 2014 | Big Dada

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 3, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
In 2013, rapper El-P - the representative of independent New York rap (with Company Flow, then going solo and creating the label Definitive Jux) – joined up with Killer Mike, a solid street rapper from Atlanta who made a name for himself on OutKast’s debut album. Seven years and three albums later under the name Run The Jewels, the duo has not only become inseparable (and almost exclusive) but also an essential group on the contemporary rap scene. On RTJ4, the two forty-somethings continue to carry the torch for a noisy and rebellious rap inherited from Public Enemy. While the influence of the Bomb Squad, which was tangible even from their first productions in the mid-90s, is more present than ever, El-P stirs up his own sonic revolution and sets fire to all kinds of things by sampling the post-punk group Gang Of Four (the ground below), distinguishing himself over dancehall riddims (holy calamafuck, co-produced by Dave Sitek from TV On The Radio), recording Native American saxophonist Cochemea (a few words for the firing squad (radiation)) and bringing together big names as diverse as Pharrell Williams, Zack de La Rocha, Josh Homme, Mavis Staples and DJ Premier. Articulate and never overly wordy, the two rappers complement each other impressively in their timbres, their flows and their writing. El-P has retained from the golden age of indie rap a taste and talent for double entendres and witty punchlines, and Killer Mike, who in the civilian world has become one of the leading voices on the American left, alongside Bernie Sanders, manages the feat of putting social commentary back at the heart of rap. Being released in the midst of the public uprising in the United States following the death of George Floyd at the hands of the police, RTJ4 is like a real-time and inevitably icy autopsy of Trump's America. © Damien Besançon/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 24, 2016 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 26, 2013 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 2, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Arriving earlier than expected as both a global pandemic and a nationwide movement against police brutality gripped the United States, RTJ4 distills the anger and frustration of the people through Run the Jewels' hard-hitting, no-nonsense revolution anthems. Trim with no filler, this fourth set from the outspoken duo provides relevant history lessons that are more useful than a classroom textbook. Rousing and lyrically dexterous, Killer Mike and El-P deliver their densest collection yet, balancing clever bon mots with tongue-twisting screeds decrying police brutality, systemic racism, class injustice, and a litany of other ills plaguing the nation. RTJ4 rarely strays from the intensely political; when it does, the duo shine with boastful quips and chest-thumping bravado, loosely weaving their "Yankee and the Brave" personas -- alluding to the baseball teams from their respective home bases -- with production that merges old-school hip-hop nostalgia with aggressively sharp contemporary stylings. BOOTS and Dave Sitek return for the very RTJ-titled "Holy Calamafuck," a menacing attack that's bested only by the clattering "Goonies vs. E.T.," which sounds like a Prodigy track without the techno breakbeat. Additional guests include 2 Chainz on the breathless "Out of Sight"; DJ Premier and Greg Nice on the "DWYCK"-sampling "Ooh La La"; and Mr. Muthafuckin eXquire on the neon dystopia of "Never Look Back." Meanwhile, an unlikely pair join forces on the swirling "Pulling the Pin," with Josh Homme's ghostly wails and Mavis Staples' pained cries creating an RTJ-meets-...Like Clockwork doomscape that pushes back against a power structure that allows for "filthy criminals...at the pinnacle." On album highlight "JU$T," "poet pugilist" Zack de la Rocha and Pharrell Williams join the fight by contributing popping production and a condensed socio-economic lecture, pulling back the curtain to reveal "murderous chokehold cops still earning a living" and "all these slave masters posing on your dollars." On "Walking in the Snow," Mike, El-P and Gangsta Boo tackle the American school-to-prison pipeline and those "chokehold cops," directly invoking the spirit of Eric Garner -- who was killed by Staten Island police in 2014 as he pleaded, "I can't breathe" -- and unwittingly honoring George Floyd, whose murder under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer prompted protests across the globe and pushed RTJ4's early release. Bringing the past and present full circle, Mike reminds listeners to "never forget in the story of Jesus, the hero was killed by the state." Much like reality, the raw and unflinching RTJ4 is a lot to take in, both a balm for the rage and fuel to keep the fire burning. Although eerily prescient, RTJ4 is less prophetic and more a case of deja vu, addressing the endemic issues of a broken country that sadly continue. This has all happened before and, as El-P laments, this is the "same point in history back to haunt us." © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 3, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Arriving earlier than expected as both a global pandemic and a nationwide movement against police brutality gripped the United States, RTJ4 distills the anger and frustration of the people through Run the Jewels' hard-hitting, no-nonsense revolution anthems. Trim with no filler, this fourth set from the outspoken duo provides relevant history lessons that are more useful than a classroom textbook. Rousing and lyrically dexterous, Killer Mike and El-P deliver their densest collection yet, balancing clever bon mots with tongue-twisting screeds decrying police brutality, systemic racism, class injustice, and a litany of other ills plaguing the nation. RTJ4 rarely strays from the intensely political; when it does, the duo shine with boastful quips and chest-thumping bravado, loosely weaving their "Yankee and the Brave" personas -- alluding to the baseball teams from their respective home bases -- with production that merges old-school hip-hop nostalgia with aggressively sharp contemporary stylings. BOOTS and Dave Sitek return for the very RTJ-titled "Holy Calamafuck," a menacing attack that's bested only by the clattering "Goonies vs. E.T.," which sounds like a Prodigy track without the techno breakbeat. Additional guests include 2 Chainz on the breathless "Out of Sight"; DJ Premier and Greg Nice on the "DWYCK"-sampling "Ooh La La"; and Mr. Muthafuckin eXquire on the neon dystopia of "Never Look Back." Meanwhile, an unlikely pair join forces on the swirling "Pulling the Pin," with Josh Homme's ghostly wails and Mavis Staples' pained cries creating an RTJ-meets-...Like Clockwork doomscape that pushes back against a power structure that allows for "filthy criminals...at the pinnacle." On album highlight "JU$T," "poet pugilist" Zack de la Rocha and Pharrell Williams join the fight by contributing popping production and a condensed socio-economic lecture, pulling back the curtain to reveal "murderous chokehold cops still earning a living" and "all these slave masters posing on your dollars." On "Walking in the Snow," Mike, El-P and Gangsta Boo tackle the American school-to-prison pipeline and those "chokehold cops," directly invoking the spirit of Eric Garner -- who was killed by Staten Island police in 2014 as he pleaded, "I can't breathe" -- and unwittingly honoring George Floyd, whose murder under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer prompted protests across the globe and pushed RTJ4's early release. Bringing the past and present full circle, Mike reminds listeners to "never forget in the story of Jesus, the hero was killed by the state." Much like reality, the raw and unflinching RTJ4 is a lot to take in, both a balm for the rage and fuel to keep the fire burning. Although eerily prescient, RTJ4 is less prophetic and more a case of deja vu, addressing the endemic issues of a broken country that sadly continue. This has all happened before and, as El-P laments, this is the "same point in history back to haunt us." © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released March 25, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 26, 2013 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released November 12, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 24, 2016 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 15, 2021 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 8, 2021 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 27, 2014 | Mass Appeal

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 3, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 26, 2015 | Mass Appeal

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 11, 2018 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released November 4, 2016 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released March 25, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 12, 2021 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 29, 2017 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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