Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD£23.49

Classical - Released September 3, 2012 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
From
CD£23.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1998 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Year
From
CD£23.49

Classical - Released February 27, 1996 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RES£16.99
CD£12.49

Musical Theatre - Released September 7, 2018 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason
From
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Classical - Released October 14, 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
The "guilty pleasures" referred to in the title of this release by American soprano Renée Fleming are Fleming's own; they are small pieces that she has always wanted to record. Of course they require no apology at all. Even the familiar numbers, such as the Flower Duet from Délibes' Lakmé (track 9, performed with Susan Graham), have the kind of freshness that seems impossible if you consider that Fleming has been singing them for decades. Actually some of the music is quite unusual for an orchestral-song-and-aria collection of this kind. Fleming sings in eight languages, including Occitan, and she has both the panache and the prestige to include such items as John Corigliano's "Once there was a golden bird," from The Ghosts of Versailles, and "Vendulka's Lullaby" from Smetana's rarely heard opera The Kiss. Fleming was 53 when this album was recorded, but it is mighty hard to identify any of the vocal maladies that begin to afflict sopranos of that age. Sample the chilling, silvery finale of Undine's aria from Tchaikovsky's early opera Undine, itself not terribly frequently performed, for confirmation. It is not only the creamy tones but the sense of fun and accomplishment that makes Fleming such a joy to listen to, and these qualities are on fully display here, ably encouraged by the Philharmonia Orchestra under Sebastian Lang-Lessing. © TiVo
From
HI-RES£16.49
CD£11.99

Classical - Released January 6, 2017 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Nearly 58 years old when the recording was released in early 2017, Renée Fleming was obviously not content to retread familiar territory. True, she delivers a standard repertory (and quintessentially Fleming) performance in Samuel Barber's Knoxville, Summer of 1915, Op. 24, her just slightly smokier voice fitting Barber's lush setting of the James Agee text especially well. The Strand Settings of Anders Hillborg (in English) were commissioned from this Swedish composer by Fleming; they're in the grand tradition of Scandinavian nature evocations, and they fit Fleming's voice exceptionally well. But the big news here is the set of Björk songs. Fleming has always had a flair for material originating from the popular sphere, but her work here is exceptional. She alters her voice production to a startling degree, making much more use of the microphone than usual and offering a flat tone that does not imitate Björk, but plausibly suggests her. Yet she's still definitely recognizable as Renée Fleming. Sample Jóga, both for the flavor of the orchestral arrangements by Swedish composer Hans Ek and for Fleming's apparent affinity for such lines as "a state of emergency is where I want to be." The Royal Stockholm Philharmonic under Sakari Oramo keeps up with Fleming's changing moods here, and the end result is an unusually strong Fleming release. © TiVo
From
CD£17.99

Classical - Released July 7, 2000 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

From
HI-RES£16.49
CD£11.99

Classical - Released February 1, 1998 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
From
CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

The Art of Renée Fleming is essentially an album of the soprano's most popular hits, probably not targeted at listeners who are already big fans (who are likely to already have the albums from which these selections were culled), but at more general audiences interested in expanding their operatic horizons. With a few very familiar exceptions, the songs and arias are from the Romantic and post-Romantic eras, and showcase the luxurious creaminess of Fleming's voice and her ability to spin out melodic lines with seamless, soaring lyricism. The album does not offer a representative sample of what Fleming can do -- its narrow focus excludes music of the Classical, Modern, and Contemporary eras, in all of which she excels -- but what it does it does very well. The recital albums from which these selections were taken were recorded between 1997 and 2010. Fleming receives stellar accompaniment from some of the world's finest conductors and orchestras, including (to name only a few) Georg Solti and the London Symphony Orchestra, James Levine and the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, Daniel Barenboim and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and Valery Gergiev and the Orchestra of the Mariinsky Theater. There are four bonus tracks of songs from outside the classical repertoire: "Wheels of a Dream" from the musical Ragtime; Amazing Grace, in a lovely arrangement by violinist Mark O'Connor; You'll Never Walk Alone; and Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah." These songs demonstrate Fleming's versatility and natural ability to cross effortlessly into jazz and popular styles. The recorded sound throughout is flawlessly engineered. © TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Classical - Released September 15, 2008 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

This is the second time Renée Fleming has recorded Strauss' Four Last Songs, and she gives a serene, luminous performance. One of the glories of her handling of the songs is the variety of vocal colors she brings to them. For instance, "Frühling" begins with a throaty duskiness that gives way to silky gossamer as the poetic imagery lifts from "somber shadows" to "blue skies." The details of Fleming's interpretation are always rooted in a sure sense of the songs' larger musical trajectory. She has performed this work more than any other; besides having a voice and temperament ideally suited to the songs, she brings a career's worth of experience singing them, giving her both interpretive freedom and deeply considered insight. In the program notes, she is quoted as saying, "When I started learning the epic Four Last Songs, it soon became clear to me that, no matter how well the songs were sung, it was the overall pacing of the piece, combined with the quality of the orchestral playing, that really shaped it." She has stellar collaborators in Christian Thielemann and the Münchner Philharmoniker. Thielemann's reading and the orchestra's playing are luxuriant and ecstatic. A small quibble: the songs should have been placed at the end, rather than at the beginning of the album; the radiance of the performance needs to be followed by silence. In the remaining selections, which include excerpts from Ariadne auf Naxos and Die Ägyptische Helena and various songs, Fleming sings with no less vocal beauty, but the music itself, as lovely as much of it is, overall seems anticlimactic following the sublime songs. The warmth of Decca's sound matches that of the performances. The second CD, Signature Roles at the Met Opera, is a reissue of recordings Fleming made for Decca over the years, with a variety of conductors and orchestras. The title is misleading; the fine print reads that these are "the soprano's most acclaimed roles, many performed at the Met." Decca doesn't identify the source of the performances, so it requires some sleuthing to figure out when and under what circumstances the recordings were made. The selection from Thaïs with Yves Abel leading Orchestra National Bordeaux Aquitaine is taken from a complete 2000 performance of the opera; the selections from Eugene Onegin and Rusalka and Otello, with Georg Solti leading the London Symphony Orchestra, are from the 1996 collection Signatures-Great Opera Scenes; and the final scene from Capriccio, with Christoph Eschenbach leading the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, is taken from a 1998 album Strauss Heroines. These are in fact some of Fleming's most characteristic roles from the late- and post-Romantic eras, and in each, her velvety voice and emotional and dramatic focus are on superb display. Here, closing the CD with the tender, bittersweet, ambiguous finale to Capriccio is a brilliant artistic decision. This collection should be of interest to any Fleming fan who doesn't already have the previous releases of these performances, and it makes a terrific introduction for anyone who wants to get to know her work. © TiVo
From
HI-RES£16.49
CD£11.99

Classical - Released June 14, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
A long break. In the fall of 2018, Renée Fleming sang for Broadway musicals under the BBC Concert Orchestra led by Rob Fisher including the likes of Jerome Kern, Richard Rogers, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Stephen Sondheim, and some lesser-known names. A little unexpected yet welcome, with this new work, the American soprano returns to a more traditional repertoire. To be precise, she puts forward a very beautiful selection of Brahms’ Lieder, the entirety of Schumann’s Fraueliebe und -Leben Op. 42, and finally Mahler’s Rückert-Lieder in an orchestral interpretation led by Christian Thielemann with the Münchner Philharmoniker. Today, Renée Fleming’s tone is perfectly crepuscular, autumnal and suitable for these Lieders filled with melancholy. Harmut Höll’s accompaniments are beautiful (especially in Brahms), and the direction of Thielemann is often poetic
From
CD£6.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

From
CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Forging a unique creative relationship, Lee Ritenour and Dave Grusin's mutual professional history extends back some two decades. Ritenour was a core artist on Grusin's label, GRP, throughout the 1980s and early '90s; in 1986, they first collaborated on the Grammy Award winning Harlequin, a critically-acclaimed, Brazilian-themed recording. Ritenour also appeared on many of the pianist/composer's film scores and solo recordings, and the two jammed together on GRP Super Live in 1987. Two Worlds, the classical-oriented labor of love that reunites the two legends, is more than simply a beautiful creative departure from their usual jazz-oriented projects. A blend of original compositions and respectful reworkings of timeless classics from Bach, Bartok, Villalobos, Mompov, and Segovia, the collection -- which features stellar guest performances by opera star Renee Fleming, violinist Gil Shaham, and cellist Julian Lloyd-Webber -- finds Ritenour and Grusin joyously reconnecting with their rich classical roots. Among the highlights are the lush, highly percussive Vivaldi/Bach piece "Bach Concerto, featuring a twenty-piece string section; "Bachianas Aria," a piece from Brazilian composer Villalobos, provides a showcase for opera diva Renee Fleming. As for the original compositions, there's the haunting, melodic "Elegia," which Grusin composed many years ago for his late father, a violinist, featuring Gil Shaham; "Lagrima (Lee's Prelude)," a graceful Ritenour original led by the classical guitar; "River's Song," Grusin's clever medley adaptation of the folk songs "The Water Is Wide" and "Shenandoah," featuring Fleming on vocals and "Canto," an Italian-styled "winter song" which Grusin originally wrote for a Ritenour project in the late '70s. Timeless yet contemporary, Two Worlds is beautiful reunion of these musical soul mates. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Renée Fleming is widely hailed as one of the world's leading sopranos--and for good reason. The charismatic singer has captivated audiences worldwide with a voice of stunning beauty and a radiant stage presence. She's a true diva in the best sense of the word, acclaimed for her brilliance in the works of Strauss and Mozart, as well as the bel canto repertoire. A recital disc of Handel arias may seem a departure, but the singer's training was grounded in the great composer's canon, and she enjoyed great success in the title role of a 1999 production of 'Alcina.' The program offers both well-known and rarely heard works spanning 40 years of Handel's career, from the da capo arias of the early Italian operas, through to the later English-language oratorios. Fleming's accounts offer a richness of tone and vocal warmth not generally associated with Baroque opera, but well suited to such sumptuous music. The elaborate ornamentation and virtuosic leaps and runs present in many of the arias allow Fleming to demonstrate her remarkable technique, notably on "Let the bright Seraphim" and "Da tempeste il legno infranto." The expertise of Harry Bicket and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightment in this repertoire manifests itself through deeply informed accounts of the scores, and proves to be an essential component of this outstanding disc. © TiVo
From
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Ambient/New Age - Released November 17, 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
As a genre, holiday music has an entirely different alignment than most, being song- and theme-driven, and any approach, from pop, rock, country, blues, and jazz to new age and classical, will work. And since it is also seasonal, and therefore shared by all, it's the ultimate crossover genre, a kind of jointly shared catalog of songs full of ready-made motifs and themes, and in the case of Christmas music, a unified hope for joy and peace on earth. What soprano Renée Fleming has done with the David Frost-produced Christmas in New York, her first holiday album, is add place to the mix. Conjuring moments of a wintery carriage ride through Central Park, twinkling lights, and bright fallen snow on 5th Avenue, Rockefeller Center aglow, and chestnuts roasting on every corner, Fleming's first Christmas album, although tracked in the studio, flows and unfolds like a limited-run seasonal Broadway stage tribute to the city, complete with a host of guests like Kelli O'Hara, Rufus Wainwright, Gregory Porter, Brad Mehldau, and Wynton Marsalis. There's a gentle, jazzy, folky crossover pop feel to things, with Fleming's beautiful voice showing endless little stylistic variations from track to track, from the opening "Winter Wonderland," which features Marsalis-led horns, through the country-folk-tinged "Silver Bells" (a duet with O'Hara), and then closing things out in a nice story arc with the Christmas lullaby "Still, Still, Still," a duet with Kurt Elling. The curveball here, and one of the best tracks, is a gorgeous and hushed version of Sandy Denny's "Who Knows Where the Time Goes" (featuring Mehldau), which shows just how versatile this timeless song (which one would not, at first, think of as a Christmas song) is, and in Fleming's hands, it sums up the rush and glow, hurry and flow and emotional pull of a Christmas season in New York City. Look for this set to become a seasonal favorite. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Incredibly, the world's greatest living conductor is getting better as he gets older. It's true -- Claudio Abbado, whose combination of effortless technique, lucid textures, and luminous tone coupled with his endless love for music has made him the preeminent conductor of our time, has only gotten better with age. Abbado's first Mahler's Fourth from 1978 is beautifully played by the Vienna Philharmonic, radiantly sung by Frederica von Stade, and joyously conducted by the young Maestro at the first peak of his powers. After his successful years with the Berlin Philharmonic and especially after some health problems, Abbado's second Mahler's Fourth from 2005 is extraordinarily spiritually led by the old Master at the peak of his interpretative abilities. His fluent technique is even more refined, but Abbado now seems more relaxed and thus more expressive than before, allowing and even encouraging portamento and vibrato. His lucid textures are less contrapuntal now and more flowing and his luminous lines are more lyrical and even more luminous. And his endless love of music -- and of life -- has infused the performance with a tangible sense of transcendence. The Berlin Philharmonic responds to its former music director with obvious affection and consummate artistry. Some listeners might find that Renée Fleming is too ironically maternal for the child's view of heaven that closes the symphony, but no listener will complain that Fleming is anything less than incandescently erotic in Berg's Sieben frühe Lieder that closes the disc. Deutsche Grammophon's live sound is entirely translucent. © TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

The voice of Renée Fleming is one of the most beautiful in opera. Her wide range of roles, from Handel's Alcina to her appearance in Previn's A Streetcar named Desire, display a breadth of interest in and curiosity about the byways of opera. This recital covers some of the greatest soprano arias from Bellini to Puccini. All have been recorded many times, and most listeners will have a favorite version as a touchstone performance. As lovely one may find much of the singing, it is possible to be troubled by this disc. Perhaps in an effort to avoid the criticism of blandness often applied to Kiri Te Kanawa, Fleming has gone too far in trying to inflect every word with deep meaning. The tempo and phrasing are played-with so much that at times you may be reminded of Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, although Fleming never goes to her extremes. There are times when just allowing the music to makes its point is enough. The recitative preceding Nedda's "Bird song" in I Pagliacci is simply too weighty for the character. Unfortunately the recitative to the Adriana Lecouvreur aria is omitted -- and that would be the place for such an approach. "Casta diva" needs to have its cabaletta to fulfill the form of the piece. The French arias are the best items, and it is good to have a recording of the "Bolero" from Verdi's Les Vèpres siciliennes in the original French. Fleming's high E at the end is fine, but Mackerras should have utilized the traditional concert ending; the coda is too long for recital purposes. Nitpicking aside, there is fine singing on this disc -- but its approach is too intellectual for the content. © TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

From
CD£12.49

Classical - Released September 15, 2008 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

This is the second time Renée Fleming has recorded Strauss' Four Last Songs, and she gives a serene, luminous performance. One of the glories of her handling of the songs is the variety of vocal colors she brings to them. For instance, "Frühling" begins with a throaty duskiness that gives way to silky gossamer as the poetic imagery lifts from "somber shadows" to "blue skies." The details of Fleming's interpretation are always rooted in a sure sense of the songs' larger musical trajectory. She has performed this work more than any other; besides having a voice and temperament ideally suited to the songs, she brings a career's worth of experience singing them, giving her both interpretive freedom and deeply considered insight. In the program notes, she is quoted as saying, "When I started learning the epic Four Last Songs, it soon became clear to me that, no matter how well the songs were sung, it was the overall pacing of the piece, combined with the quality of the orchestral playing, that really shaped it." She has stellar collaborators in Christian Thielemann and the Münchner Philharmoniker. Thielemann's reading and the orchestra's playing are luxuriant and ecstatic. A small quibble: the songs should have been placed at the end, rather than at the beginning of the album; the radiance of the performance needs to be followed by silence. In the remaining selections, which include excerpts from Ariadne auf Naxos and Die Ägyptische Helena and various songs, Fleming sings with no less vocal beauty, but the music itself, as lovely as much of it is, overall seems anticlimactic following the sublime songs. The warmth of Decca's sound matches that of the performances. The second CD, Signature Roles at the Met Opera, is a reissue of recordings Fleming made for Decca over the years, with a variety of conductors and orchestras. The title is misleading; the fine print reads that these are "the soprano's most acclaimed roles, many performed at the Met." Decca doesn't identify the source of the performances, so it requires some sleuthing to figure out when and under what circumstances the recordings were made. The selection from Thaïs with Yves Abel leading Orchestra National Bordeaux Aquitaine is taken from a complete 2000 performance of the opera; the selections from Eugene Onegin and Rusalka and Otello, with Georg Solti leading the London Symphony Orchestra, are from the 1996 collection Signatures-Great Opera Scenes; and the final scene from Capriccio, with Christoph Eschenbach leading the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, is taken from a 1998 album Strauss Heroines. These are in fact some of Fleming's most characteristic roles from the late- and post-Romantic eras, and in each, her velvety voice and emotional and dramatic focus are on superb display. Here, closing the CD with the tender, bittersweet, ambiguous finale to Capriccio is a brilliant artistic decision. This collection should be of interest to any Fleming fan who doesn't already have the previous releases of these performances, and it makes a terrific introduction for anyone who wants to get to know her work. © TiVo