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Classical - Released February 8, 1995 | Naxos

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Concertos - Released February 9, 1995 | Naxos

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Cello Concertos - Released February 9, 1995 | Naxos

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Classical - Released February 13, 1995 | Naxos

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Classical - Released January 2, 2005 | Naxos

Booklet
What Mozart did for the concerto for piano and orchestra, Boccherini did for the concerto for cello and orchestra, because like Mozart, Boccherini created a genre. For Boccherini, the cello concerto was filled with graceful, lyrical melodies; lightly dancing rhythms; and brightly colored accompaniments. In his series of recordings of the complete cello concertos, Raphael Wallfisch has made the best possible case for Boccherini's achievement. In this third volume, Wallfisch performs what were thought to be Boccherini's three final works in the genre plus a recently discovered work of possibly later vintage. Wallfisch's tone is brilliant, his technique is virtuosic, and his interpretations are infectious. Nicholas Ward and the Northern Chamber Orchestra are relaxed and confident. Naxos' sound is clear, warm, and full. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 6, 2011 | Naxos

Booklet
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Chamber Music - Released June 3, 2014 | Naxos

Booklet
This release appears to be a sampler of several albums of British cello-and-piano music recorded between 2005 and 2010 for the British Music Society in presumably a single limited-edition run. Lovers of 20th century chamber music will be glad to have it, for the composers represented are sparsely heard even in Britain; William Busch, who died in 1945 after walking through a snowstorm to return to his young son, does not even appear on Wikipedia. All four of the works, even the Cello Sonata No. 2 of Arnold Cooke, composed in 1980, are in a conservative tonal idiom, but "Romantic" would not be quite the right word. The influence of Shostakovich, who had been proclaimed the greatest composer in the world by William Walton, looms over most of these works, which are heavily contrapuntal. The Partita, Op. 35, of Kenneth Leighton, from 1959, consists of an Elegy, a Scherzo, and a theme and six variations; it could be programmed profitably along with a cello sonata by Shostakovich or Prokofiev. The most purely Brahmsian piece is the Cello Sonata No. 2 in G minor, Op. 66, of the curiously named William Wordsworth, which achieves an epic intensity and does not really feel conservative. Nothing here is of earthshaking importance, but all four pieces have personality and did not deserve the oblivion to which they were consigned by a dictatorial modernism. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 6, 2015 | Naxos

Booklet
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Classical - Released June 2, 2015 | Naxos

Booklet
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Classical - Released April 1, 2016 | Naxos

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