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Cello Concertos - Released November 1, 1984 | Chandos

CD£6.39

Chamber Music - Released January 24, 1995 | Marco-Polo

Booklet
CD£5.79

Classical - Released February 8, 1995 | Naxos

Booklet
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Cello Concertos - Released February 9, 1995 | Naxos

Booklet
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Concertos - Released February 9, 1995 | Naxos

Booklet
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Classical - Released February 13, 1995 | Naxos

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 1996 | Nimbus Records

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Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Decca (UMO)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Decca (UMO)

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Classical - Released August 1, 2001 | Chandos

Booklet
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Classical - Released October 25, 2002 | Cello Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca (UMO)

One is at first dubious. Song of the Birds (aka Cello Concerto No. 2 by Herbert Murrill)? Philharmonic Variations by Haydn Wood? One has of course heard of Edmund Rubbra and his Soliloquy for cello and orchestra sounds faintly familiar. But who is George Dyson and what is his Prelude, Fantasy and Chaconne for cello and orchestra? Who are the composers and what are these works? The short answer is that these are works for cello and orchestra composed by Englishmen in the years surrounding WWII. The shorter answer is: two bright pieces and two dull pieces. Cellist Raphael Wallfisch brings his customary virtuosity and sensitivity to all his performances. Conductor Vernon Handley brings his usual strength and stolidness to all his performances. The BBC Concert Orchestra brings its standard competence and professionalism to all its performances. But while Rubbra's soulful Soliloquy and Dyson's splendid Prelude, Fantasy and Chaconne sound superb in Wallfisch and Handley's performances, there is nothing they or anyone else could do to breathe life into Wood's dreary Philharmonic Variations or Murrill's dismal Song of the Birds. And it doesn't help that White Line's digital sound is dim and dull throughout. For folks who have to have everything Rubbra or Dyson ever wrote, this disc will fill out a shelf. For the casual listener, this disc will induce creeping catatonia. © TiVo
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Concertos - Released November 1, 2004 | Chandos

Booklet
For admirers of Steuart Bedford's recordings of the music of Benjamin Britten, this re-release of his 1984 recordings of the Symphony for cello and orchestra with his arrangement of a concert suite from Death in Venice will be gratefully received. Bedford had been anointed by Peter Pears, Britten's musical executor, as a Britten interpreter and even allowed to create the concert suite. Bedford's conducting is surely more assured than Britten's in general, but his interpretations were clearly steeped in Britten's interpretations. Bedford's performance of the Symphony with cellist Raphael Wallfisch has all the essential characteristics of Britten's with Rostropovich. Both are powerfully dramatic, deeply lyrical, and ultimately elegiac performances and the brawny tone, rugged sonorities, and muscular rhythms so characteristic of Britten and Rostropovich's interpretation are likewise characteristic of Bedford and Wallfisch's interpretation. But while Bedford and Wallfisch's performance is brilliantly played and very convincing, Britten and Rostropovich's performance is transcendently played and truly compelling. Bedford's performance of his own Death in Venice suite is closer to compelling. While his suite has the dramatic shape of the opera and his performance had the essential character of Britten's, his interpretation is his own. Bedford's interpretation is as luminously despairing as the opera, it has the convictions of its compulsions. The early digital sound is surprisingly lush and full. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 2005 | Nimbus Records

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Classical - Released January 2, 2005 | Naxos

Booklet
What Mozart did for the concerto for piano and orchestra, Boccherini did for the concerto for cello and orchestra, because like Mozart, Boccherini created a genre. For Boccherini, the cello concerto was filled with graceful, lyrical melodies; lightly dancing rhythms; and brightly colored accompaniments. In his series of recordings of the complete cello concertos, Raphael Wallfisch has made the best possible case for Boccherini's achievement. In this third volume, Wallfisch performs what were thought to be Boccherini's three final works in the genre plus a recently discovered work of possibly later vintage. Wallfisch's tone is brilliant, his technique is virtuosic, and his interpretations are infectious. Nicholas Ward and the Northern Chamber Orchestra are relaxed and confident. Naxos' sound is clear, warm, and full. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released March 29, 2005 | Cello Classics

The mark of a good transcription is that it adds another way of looking at the original. The mark of a great transcription is that it makes the listener forget all about the original. So while Beethoven's pupil Czerny's transcription of his master's "Kreutzer" Violin Sonata for cello is a good transcription, enabling the listener to hear the work re-imagined as a virtuoso cello work, the master's transcription of his own Horn Sonata for cello is a great transcription, enabling the listener to hear the work recomposed as a virtuoso cello work. In this recording by cellist Raphael Wallfisch, while both performances are enormously attractive, the differences are immediately apparent. Despite the undoubted excellence and immense force of Wallfisch's playing, Czerny's cello transcription of the Kreutzer is a bit thick in the middle and a little plump on the bottom. But Beethoven's cello transcription of the Horn Sonata is a new work: a muscular but tender work, a rhythmic but sweet work, an enjoyable and entertaining work that completely blots the original from the memory. Pianist John York is a strong and supportive accompanist. The disc's central Duet for Viola and Cello "With Two Obbligato Eyeglasses" between Wallfisch and violist Yuko Inoue is light and delightful. Cello Classics' sound is warm and enveloping. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 1, 2006 | Nimbus Records

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Chamber Music - Released July 1, 2007 | Nimbus Records