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Duets - Released March 1, 2013 | Nimbus Records

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Classical - Released April 1, 2006 | Nimbus Records

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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 2005 | Nimbus Records

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Classical - Released May 27, 2016 | Chandos

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Decca (UMO)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca (UMO)

One is at first dubious. Song of the Birds (aka Cello Concerto No. 2 by Herbert Murrill)? Philharmonic Variations by Haydn Wood? One has of course heard of Edmund Rubbra and his Soliloquy for cello and orchestra sounds faintly familiar. But who is George Dyson and what is his Prelude, Fantasy and Chaconne for cello and orchestra? Who are the composers and what are these works? The short answer is that these are works for cello and orchestra composed by Englishmen in the years surrounding WWII. The shorter answer is: two bright pieces and two dull pieces. Cellist Raphael Wallfisch brings his customary virtuosity and sensitivity to all his performances. Conductor Vernon Handley brings his usual strength and stolidness to all his performances. The BBC Concert Orchestra brings its standard competence and professionalism to all its performances. But while Rubbra's soulful Soliloquy and Dyson's splendid Prelude, Fantasy and Chaconne sound superb in Wallfisch and Handley's performances, there is nothing they or anyone else could do to breathe life into Wood's dreary Philharmonic Variations or Murrill's dismal Song of the Birds. And it doesn't help that White Line's digital sound is dim and dull throughout. For folks who have to have everything Rubbra or Dyson ever wrote, this disc will fill out a shelf. For the casual listener, this disc will induce creeping catatonia. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Decca (UMO)

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Classical - Released July 3, 2020 | CPO

Booklet
Mieczysław Weinberg, a composer whose extraordinarily prolix repertoire contains over five hundred works, has been resurfacing over the years after being lost to history. Born in Warsaw in 1919, Weinberg suffered the brunt of Hitler’s hatred and had to flee to the USSR, but his entire family remained behind and were subsequently killed in Nazi concentration camps. He was soon forced to flee once again, this time hiding in Uzbekistan, where he was supported by Shostakovich but was still the victim of anti-Semitic persecution. The power of Weinberg’s music was recognised by many great Soviet musicians who then spread the word in the 1960s for others to play it. He died in great poverty in Moscow, 1996, due to ill health. As the number of musicians performing his works has increased in recent years, his musical stature has now risen to the same level as that of Shostakovich and Bartók. The works recorded here are part of an edition devoted to cello concertos composed by exiled Jewish composers, under the patronage of English cellist Raphael Wallfisch. Written in 1948 and premiered by Rostropovich, the meditative, sombre and tense Cello Concerto, Op. 43, gradually integrated itself into the repertoire of a new generation of performers. The Concertino, which was composed the same year in record time, wasn’t premiered until 2017 and merges Jewish folklore with Polish folk music. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 3, 2020 | CPO

Booklet
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Chamber Music - Released January 3, 2020 | Lyrita

Booklet
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Classical - Released June 7, 2019 | CPO

Booklet
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Chamber Music - Released May 5, 2017 | Nimbus Records

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Chamber Music - Released February 7, 2020 | Nimbus Records

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Classical - Released December 1, 2018 | Lyrita

Booklet
The reputation of English composer Rebecca Clarke has been on the upswing, with the pianist John York, heard on this album, among various musicians supervising performing editions of her work. Her Viola Sonata of 1919 is one of her best-known works, and despite the fact that Clarke herself was a violist, it may benefit from the recasting here for cello and piano, made by Clarke. The muscular, passionate take on French Impressionism that characterizes this work and the Rhapsody for cello and piano of 1923 is brought out well by the cello in the case of the sonata. Sample the sonata's opening "Impetuoso" movement for an idea. There are lots of other attractions here as well: examples of the later, folk-influenced phase of Clarke's career in the lovely Passacaglia on an Old English Tune and I'll Bid My Heart Be Still, and an unusual example of a contemporary work that directly addresses one of its near predecessors, York's Dialogue with Rebecca Clarke (2007), which weaves motifs from the sonata with original music. Cellist Raphael Wallfisch has the right big, melodic sound for this material, and with fine sound from Lyrita (recorded at an unidentified location), this is a standout among the group of Clarke recordings from the mid-2010s. © TiVo
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Cello Concertos - Released July 6, 2018 | CPO

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Born in 1911 and 1903 respectively, these German composers – who were, unfortunately for them, born Jewish – Franz Reizenstein and Berthold Goldschmidt were exiled from Germany in 1934 and 1935, but their stories were very different. From 1932 Goldschmidt had made a serious name for himself following the performance of one of his operas in Mannheim. But he was already 29 and had some serious musical and social baggage behind him, not only in the form of a job assisting Erich Kleiber at the Berlin production of Wozzeck. So when he came to Britain, he was already well-regarded. But the unfortunate Reizenstein was only 21 when he came to London, where he wanted to continue the studies he had started with Hindemith in Berlin... Happily for him, he found a space under the benevolent wing of Vaughan Williams, and eventually took English nationality and even became a teacher in the Royal College of Music. As for Goldschmidt, who was already famous and whose opera The Magnificent Cuckold was to have been first performed in 1933 – an ill-fated year – he found himself classed as a "degenerate artist", which prompted his departure shortly after. Neither of the two composers would give into the atonal, serialist Schönbergian torrent, let alone the post-war avant-garde: and so their music was soon thought of as old hat... Goldschmidt even quit composing in 1958, and didn't return to it until the end of his life, once the serialist dictatorship had fallen amid much derision. The two cello concertos supplied here by the great Raphael Wallfisch were written and performed in the 1950s, and then largely forgotten for decades, in spite of the support of the equally-great Feuermann. Here, we find a language which is at once classical and modern, in the tradition of Hindemith and Vaughan Williams, and surely Shostakovitch too – these are works that richly deserve a rediscovery. Unlike the Reizenstein concerto, the Goldschmidt one is not a world premiere. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released August 1, 2001 | Chandos

Booklet
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Classical - Released November 1, 2014 | Lyrita

Booklet
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Classical - Released December 1, 2018 | Lyrita

Proving that there are still forgotten twentieth century English composers deserving of being recognized, Lyrita has released the first recordings of the Cello Concerto and the Piano Concerto of William Busch. A student of Ireland and a friend of Alan Bush, Busch had a deserved dual reputation as a sharp-edged, strong-willed modernist composer and a kind-hearted and retiring man when he died in 1945 at the age of 43, leaving behind a beloved wife, two children, and an impressive but soon-forgotten body of works. This is a shame: the works here are fully worthy of joining the English standard repertoire. Busch's Piano Concerto was premiered in 1937 and dubbed by Vaughan Williams as a "masterly" work, while his Cello Concerto was premiered in 1941 under Adrian Boult, and he, too, was favorably impressed by the composer's craft and inspiration. As played here by pianist Piers Lane and cellist Raphael Wallfisch and accompanied by Vernon Handley leading the Royal Philharmonic, both works live up to these compliments. Lean, muscular music full of powerful ideas and gripping developments expressed with intensity, Busch's music is still resolutely tonal and unfailingly direct. And yet it's also deeply melodic music with expressive themes that will stick in your ear given half a chance. Both the Cello Concerto and the Piano Concerto make virtuoso demands on the soloists as well as the orchestral players, but the writing is never merely showy but rather always straight to the point without a wasted note or gesture. Imagine a more sinewy and less sarcastic Walton or a more refined and less bucolic Vaughan Williams and you'll have some idea what to expect. If you enjoy those composers' works, you'll surely enjoy Busch, as well. Lyrita's digital sound is clean, clear, colorful, and deep. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 1, 2009 | Nimbus Records