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Classical - Released October 7, 2014 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released October 1, 2013 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Volume 1 of Stéphane Denève's series of the orchestral works of Maurice Ravel offers five of the composer's most popular compositions. Easily the best known is Boléro, a sophisticated study in orchestration built on a hypnotic ostinato that steadily rises to a violent climax. Right behind it in fame is La valse, which has a similarly obsessive waltz rhythm and a trajectory to an explosive conclusion. While these pieces are the most celebrated in Ravel's oeuvre, not least because of their memorable build-ups, the three remaining selections are much subtler in their orchestral effects and musical styles. Le tombeau de Couperin, based on the collection for piano, is an elegant suite displaying opulent impressionistic colors worked into Baroque dance forms. Alborada del Gracioso is the orchestral version of a dazzling and enormously difficult movement from the piano collection Miroirs, and it is a sparkling character piece that plays off the virtuosity of the original. Rapsodie espagnole is a tour de force of exotic colors and melodies based on Spanish folk music, always a source of inspiration for French composers. Denève leads the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra in these 2012 performances, and the playing is vibrant and atmospheric, winning high marks for the delicate execution and carefully blended timbres that make Ravel's orchestral music marvelously transparent and magical.
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Classical - Released September 6, 2011 | SWR Classic

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£71.91

Classical - Released October 2, 2012 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released January 5, 2018 | SWR Classic

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released February 9, 2018 | SWR Classic

Booklet
£7.99

Classical - Released February 9, 2018 | SWR Classic

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | SWR Classic

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | SWR Classic

Booklet
£44.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released August 7, 2012 | SWR Classic

Roger Norrington has a reputation for scrupulously following historic performance practices by consistently observing the instrumentation, playing styles, tempos, and even the orchestral seating arrangements that can be known of a given time period. As a result of his obsessive attention to these aspects of Classical and Romantic performances, his readings often seem more technically accomplished than deeply expressive, and his treatment of the music can, at its worst, be clinical and chilly. Even so, Norrington's interpretations of the Classical repertoire have yielded many successes, and his performances of Franz Schubert's Symphonies No. 4 and No. 5 are among his better recordings with the SWR Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra. These works are cast in the mold and style of Mozart's symphonies, and Schubert's lyrical music is still constrained by the norms of Classical form, so Norrington's intellectuality and emotional reserve work well here. The orchestra has the characteristic sonorities of a Classical orchestra -- strings played without vibrato, woodwinds offering distinctive colors, and horns sounding slightly rustic -- so the music is executed with great polish and authentic style. In terms of expression, these performances are slightly dry, though they are far from sterile, and Norrington even lets the orchestra show some humor, which is plainly evident in the finale of the Fifth and in the Menuetto of the Fourth.
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Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | CapriccioNR

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Classical - Released May 1, 2012 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released May 11, 2018 | SWR Classic

Booklet
The severe Paul Hindemith was never thought of as a very dynamic conductor, even of his own music. So this re-release of a recording which was brought out earlier on the label Hänssler is all the more exciting, because this version, excellently-recorded in 1958 by Stuttgart Radio (and the same could go for more or less any concert recorded by a German studio in the late 1950s) presents a rather objective, supple and malleable version; swift, with a lightness of touch, but without a hint of mysticism – which isn't a handicap, given how well-constructed the performance is, with an almost pastoral feel. The first movement proceeds with a pleasant plasticity: the Adagio with its efficient "Wagner-tuben", with neither cymbals nor triangle at the climax, is dreamy, almost sensual, a dimension that one wouldn't expect from Bruckner; the Scherzo is curiously slow, but with a great power, and the Finale quickly progresses to a conclusion which is grandiose but never grandiloquent. It's all wrapped up in a little under an hour, with an orchestra, the Baden-Baden Sudwestfunk, which, aside from being one of Germany's greatest orchestras, was very often conducted by Carl Schuricht when it played this Brucknerian repertoire: and it is plain that he is speaking, or rather performing, in a language that he knows well. This bears thrilling witness to the vision that an important composer can develop with a distant fellow artist with whom he shares at least something in common. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released December 1, 2014 | SWRmusic

£6.47

Classical - Released May 1, 2012 | Brilliant Classics

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