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Alternative & Indie - Released November 23, 1979 | Virgin

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
With this metal box, the guitar sound wall of the Sex Pistols seems rather far… Johnny Rotten, who had become once again John Lydon, invents here the long, painful and all wound up soundtrack of a martial New Wave whose groove is surprisingly cold. Controlled by Jah Wobble’s bass and slashed by Keith Levene’s guitar riffs, this second revolutionary opus from Public Image Limited invents the post-punk dub, the cold funk and the (f)rigid rock. The former Pistol shouts like a soulful muezzin and trepans even more the ears than on Never Mind The Bollocks. Published on its release date in the form of three maxi enclosed in a true film reel metal box, Metal Box follows the steps of Neu’s and Can’s German krautrock, and above all proves to be the forerunner disc of a punk funk that will resound for many years… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 1979 | Virgin Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
With this metal box, the guitar sound wall of the Sex Pistols seems rather far… Johnny Rotten, who had become once again John Lydon, invents here the long, painful and all wound up soundtrack of a martial New Wave whose groove is surprisingly cold. Controlled by Jah Wobble’s bass and slashed by Keith Levene’s guitar riffs, this second revolutionary opus from Public Image Limited invents the post-punk dub, the cold funk and the (f)rigid rock. The former Pistol shouts like a soulful muezzin and trepans even more the ears than on Never Mind The Bollocks. Published on its release date in the form of three maxi enclosed in a true film reel metal box, Metal Box follows the steps of Neu’s and Can’s German krautrock, and above all proves to be the forerunner disc of a punk funk that will resound for many years… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin Catalogue

Like it or not, Public Image Limited's First Issue (aka Public Image) was an album that helped set the pace for what eventually became known as post-punk. In England a vacuum had opened up in the wake of the breakup of the Sex Pistols in January 1978, and many punk fans and rival groups were impatient to see what ex-Sex Pistols frontman John Lydon aka "Johnny Rotten" was going to roll out next. Disheartened owing to events in his legal proceedings against the Sex Pistols management company Glitterbest, and disgusted by the punk scene in general, Lydon was determined to create something that was neither punk nor even really rock as it was known in 1978. Working with ex-Clash guitarist Keith Levene, first-time bassist Jah Wobble, and Canadian drummer Jim Walker, Public Image Limited produced an album that represented the punk sound after it had shot itself in the head and became another entity entirely. Embracing elements of dub, progressive rock, noise, and atonality and driven by Lydon's lyrical egoism and predilection towards doom, death, and horror, First Issue was among a select few 1978 albums that had something lasting to say about the future of rock music. And not everyone in 1978 wanted to hear it; contemporary critical notices for First Issue were almost uniformly negative in the extreme. Not all of the material on First Issue was necessarily forward-looking: "Attack" and "Low Life" could almost pass muster as latter-day Sex Pistols songs if it weren't for their substandard production values. These two numbers were recorded late in the project, and on the cheap, as the fledgling Public Image Limited had already been kicked out of practically every reputable studio in London. And there was a bracing song about Lydon's pet peeve, "Religion," presented in both spoken and sung incarnations. It is about as vicious and personal an anti-Catholic diatribe as exists on record, and in its day was considered a high holy turnoff by many listeners. But from there it gets better -- Public Image Limited's debut single, "Public Image," was also included on First Issue, and Keith Levene's guitar part, with its tasty suspensions and held-over-the-bar syncopation, was an important departure from standard punk guitar language absorbed so quickly by others (the Pretenders, U2, the Smiths) that listeners and musicians alike forgot the source of the sound. First Issue's opener, "Theme," was a force to be reckoned with, a grindingly slow dirge with wild, almost Hendrix-like figurations on the guitar and Wobble's floor-splitting foundation. This was punk with the power of Led Zeppelin, but none of the pretension. Lydon's anguished mantra in "Theme," "...and I just wanna die," was the exact reflection of what his generation was thinking about in the wake of the collapse of classic punk. "Annalisa" is the hardest-kicking rocker on the album, with nosebleed-strength guitar from Levene; it is so good that Nirvana in all practical purposes purloined the whole number, with minor alterations, as "Radio Friendly Unit Shifter" on In Utero. But even with all of the calculated controversy seemingly built into the various cuts on First Issue, none attracted quite so much attention as "Fodderstompf." Faced with a serious shortage of material to fill out the album and with its release date looming, Public Image Limited decided to conclude the project with a track 12:55 in length, consisting of no more than a disco beat, chattering synthesizers, a bassline, and Jah Wobble singing, shouting, and screaming the phrase "we only wanted to be loved" in a joke voice. Rock critics savaged the song as a deliberate attempt to rip off the public, but it became hugely popular at the Studio 54 disco in New York; the drag queens and hipsters sang and screamed right along with Wobble out loud on the dancefloor -- nothing like that had ever happened at Studio 54. As it is perhaps the earliest extended dance mix that has little to do with disco or dub, it is apparent that "Fodderstompf" is an obvious precursor to the acid house and techno that began to evolve in the mid-'80s, although it is seldom accredited that distinction. After it was released in December 8, 1978, First Issue peaked at number 22 on the British album charts, and import copies were snapped up in America practically as soon as they were loaded off the boat. But Warner Bros., the American label to which Public Image Limited were signed, was unhappy with the album, particularly in that the label felt the bass was mixed too loudly -- no one had ever recorded the bass so hot on a regular LP before. Public Image Limited protested, but Warner Bros. stood fast and the band ultimately relented; in the early weeks of January 1979 the whole of First Issue was re-recorded for the American market. But the only portion of this project ever to surface appeared on the backside of the U.K. 12" single of "Death Disco" in July 1979, a mix of "Fodderstompf" minus the vocals, retitled "Megga Mix." Warner Bros. never released the remade album, and the remainder of it has since disappeared. By early 1980 Trouser Press was joking that the American issue of First Issue was the "longest rush release in recorded music history," but clearly long before First Issue was a "dead" issue with Warner Bros. Right after the remake session concluded, drummer Jim Walker surprised Public Image Limited by departing with no notice to join the interesting but now forgotten English group the Pack. In came ex-101'ers drummer Richard Dudanski, and by their next album, Metal Box, Public Image Limited had already worked out an entirely different sound and approach. © Uncle Dave Lewis /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin Catalogue

The Greatest Hits, So Far mines the singles PiL released through 1990. Ten years after its release, it was doubtful that a second volume would surface (the '90s saw one lone studio release, not to mention a John Lydon "solo" record), so thankfully Lydon didn't embarrass himself by titling it "The Greatest Hits, Volume One." That said, not many outfits under the guise of one name can boast a collection of singles so diverse and ranging in quality. And really, the title should be "The Singles, So Far." By attempting to hit upon all the studio releases, bright moments like "Bad Baby," "Banging the Door," and "The Order of Death" get left behind. The distance between 1979's "Death Disco" and 1990's "Don't Ask Me" would be impossible to traverse with the trustiest of vehicles. The back cover of the disc depicts Stonehenge and an earthbound spacecraft, with a howling dog in the middle. That's accurate. With peers mutating from the Pop Group ("Careering") to Information Society ("Warrior"), PiL couldn't possibly expect to concoct a compilation that would appeal to all ears. In that regard, GHSF is more of a Denny's sampler than a thematic banquet spread. (To clarify: "Rules and Regulations" is a cheese stick, not tasty bean pâté.) Whether or not this is a proper first place to go for PiL is up for debate, as it takes a very eclectic head to thrill to both their early discordance and later chart-targeted tunefulness. It's not going to provide a solid idea of where they stood at any point in their existence, but it's just enough to pique further investigation. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Punk / New Wave - Released July 20, 2018 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

To help John Lydon celebrate the fortieth birthday of Public Image Ltd (PIL), there’s nothing better than a good old treasure chest filled with singles, rarities and concert extracts. On 5 CDs, The Public Image Is Rotten (Songs From The Heart) gathers 74 titles: every PIL single released between 1978 and 2015 (CD 1), all the B-sides, some rarities and extracts of radio sessions at John Peel’s in 1979 and Mak Goodier’s in 1992 (CD 2), some Maxi and dance remixes (CD 3), brand new mixes and titles (CD 4) and a brand new concert at the Ritz in New York on July 16, 1989 (CD 5)… Created barely a year before the end of the Sex Pistols by a Johnny Rotten that had become once again John Lydon, PIL is a post-punk oddity that will first poach on his previous band’s turf (the crazy single Public Image launched his legacy into the future) before becoming more experimental as soon as the second album, Metal Box. With aptly-named this metal box, the guitar sound barrier of the Sex Pistols seems rather far… Johnny Rotten, who had become once again John Lydon, invents here the long, painful and all wound up soundtrack of a martial New Wave whose groove is surprisingly cold. Controlled by Jah Wobble’s bass and slashed by Keith Levene’s guitar riffs, this second revolutionary opus from Public Image Limited invents the post-punk dub, the cold funk and the (f)rigid rock. Throughout the PIL saga, the former Pistol shouts like a soulful muezzin and trepans even more the ears than on Never Mind The Bollocks. He thus follows the steps of Neu’s and Can’s German krautrock, and above all proves to be the forerunner disc of a punk funk that will resound for many years. After the departures of Wobble (1981) and Levene (1984), PIL will take a less avant-garde direction, but will not be any more civilized. Those are different eras that perfectly reflects this box that is essential for the fans and useful for the newcomers. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released July 19, 2010 | Concert Live Ltd

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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin Catalogue

As opposed to the axis of throbbing bass and guitar slashings of Metal Box, The Flowers of Romance is centralized on razor-sharp drums and typically haranguing vocals. No dubwise grooves here -- bassist Jah Wobble was kicked out prior to the recording for ripping off PiL backing tracks for his solo material. And growing more disenchanted with the guitar, Keith Levene's infatuation with synthesizers was reaching a boiling point. His scythe-like guitar is truly brought out for only one song. Stark and minimal are taken to daring lengths, so it's no surprise that Virgin initially balked at issuing the heavily percussive record. "Four Enclosed Walls" opens with something of a mechanical death rattle and John Lydon's quavering warble, framed by backwards piano and Martin Atkins' spartan, dry-as-a-bone drumming. His rapier-like drums seem to serve a similar purpose to Levene's guitar on Metal Box. An unsteady drum pattern and fragile, wind chime-like guitar from Levene shape "Track 8," a bleak look at sexual relationships. Lydon adds color with pleasant imagery of Butterball turkeys and elephant graves. "Under the House" and "Francis Massacre" are the most violent tracks due to Atkins' machine gun firing and Levene's chilling atmosperics. Lydon lashes out at zealous fans on the only bottom-heavy tune, "Banging the Door": "The walls are so thin/The neighbors listen in/Keep the noise down." Perhaps the band's most challenging work (in the avant garde sense), it's just as "love it or hate it" as Metal Box; it'll either go down a treat or like a five-pound block of liverwurst. [The UK version adds three bonus tracks: an instrumental version of "The Flowers of Romance," "Another," (essentially "Graveyard" with vocals) and "Home Is Where the Heart Is." The latter two can be found on Plastic Box.] © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 4, 2015 | PiL Official

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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin Catalogue

PiL's fourth album took three years to reach fruition for a number of reasons. The initial recordings included the nucleus of John Lydon and Keith Levene; Martin Atkins was asked to stay, bringing bassist Pete Jones to help out. After those sessions and a few shows, both Levene and Jones exited. Lydon recruited a lounge act spotted at a New Jersey hotel and took them on tour. Upon re-entering the studio, Lydon and Atkins wiped the departed members off the tapes from the prior recordings, employing faceless session hacks to fill in. This resulted in one of Lydon's worst outings, the most tentative and least powerful of PiL's recordings. A thin, shrill, wheezing horn section replaces much of Levene's guitar, and the basslines sound dreadful. "This Is Not a Love Song," though accessible enough for the charts, is best left in the year of its origin. Surprisingly for Lydon, the colorful tune has a simple beat and is easy to dance to, but lacks guts. "The Pardon," like a couple other songs on the record, sounds like a bad Flowers of Romance outtake with "modern" production. With Atkins' relentless clippity-cloppity drums and Lydon's bite-free stream-of-consciousness rambling, it eventually fades into the background as a nagging drone. Closer "The Order of Death" saves the record from being a total wreck, a moody instrumental with a repetitive vocal hook and a creepy synth line. Levene, who at that point owned half of the Public Image Limited name, released the version of This Is What You Want... with him and Jones present as the pseudo-bootleg Commercial Zone, on the short-lived PiL Records. It actually preceded the official version's release by months, and a second issue followed later in the year with a slightly different track listing. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1987 | Virgin Catalogue

Happy? benefits from some relative stability in PiL's lineup, not to mention the undeniable fact that the band members' allegiance makes sense (in contrast to that of Album's crew). Keyboardist Lu Edmonds (the Damned and 3 Mustaphas 3), guitarist John McGeoch (Magazine and Siouxsie & the Banshees), drummer Bruce Smith (the Pop Group and Rip Rig & Panic), and muscular Yank bassist Allan Dias are a solid unit, forming something of a post-punk supergroup. The Blind Faith of the '80s? Even more radio friendly than Album, Happy? is increasingly entrenched in dancefloor-type fare. Lydon isn't his full-blown postal self, but he's still continents away from being rosy. Though the music might be too dated for most ears years later, Lydon's riffing on unplanned pregnancy ("The Body"), sheep mentality ("Angry"), and false national pride ("Hard Times") still holds together lyrically. McGeoch and Edmonds' sparkling work comes a little too close to stadium-bound for comfort (paging Mr. Edge...), but it's a good turn away from Album's brainy metal-wank fireworks. Just when the band sounds as if it's approaching standard issue 1987 chart fare, it fiddles with the arrangements and structures enough to make sure the songs don't qualify as such. If PiL was trying to remain accessible and challenging at the same time, the band fell just short of its goal; given the conspirators involved, Happy? is not quite as distinct as it should have been. But as far as PiL outings are considered, it was Lydon's best in six years. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 27, 1986 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

After the release of This Is What You Want, Lydon assembled yet another touring band. Martin Atkins stayed on as drummer, with Jebin Bruni and Mark Schulz joining the band's ranks. While gigging, Bruni and Schulz assisted in writing the material that wound up on Album. Atkins left to spend more time on his own projects after touring, and Lydon again scrapped his remaining associates prior to recording. Anyone's first 10,000 guesses as to who Lydon would work with next couldn't possibly come close, as the unlisted credits for Album read as a motley crew of established musicians who literally have no business being anywhere near Lydon, let alone in a studio with him or with one another. Well, maybe that made perfect sense, given Lydon's ability to baffle. The hardest working man in the avant-garde, Bill Laswell, produced and played bass, which isn't too much of a stretch. But Steve Vai and Ryuichi Sakamoto? Or better yet, Ginger Baker? (Especially odd since PiL played an April Fools' joke on the press by announcing his membership in the early '80s.) Strange bedfellows indeed, but the lineup makes for a surprisingly cohesive (if mediocre) rock record. "Rise" proves that "This Is Not a Love Song" was no fluke, not Lydon's lone stab at pop accessibility. Successfully marrying rock with Celtic folk (a heavier Dexy's Midnight Runners?), Lydon's chorus is his most hospitable yet. Opener "FFF" and "Home" are other strong points, just as driving and defiant as anything from PiL's previous output. The former is as good as hard rock got in 1985. But Album can be found lacking in its reliance on outright professionalism and polish, emphasizing skill over craft. Vai's scorched shredding likely repelled Lydon's fans more than any of PiL's earlier attempts to alienate and frustrate. The 90-second wailing over closer "Ease" is anything but; at most points, Vai's playing just doesn't fit. Unfortunately, Yellow Magic Orchestra member Sakamoto pops up only a couple times. His talent is pretty much wasted here. On the whole, Album (or Compact Disc, or Cassette) is just as generic as its title. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin Catalogue

After the release of This Is What You Want, Lydon assembled yet another touring band. Martin Atkins stayed on as drummer, with Jebin Bruni and Mark Schulz joining the band's ranks. While gigging, Bruni and Schulz assisted in writing the material that wound up on Album. Atkins left to spend more time on his own projects after touring, and Lydon again scrapped his remaining associates prior to recording. Anyone's first 10,000 guesses as to who Lydon would work with next couldn't possibly come close, as the unlisted credits for Album read as a motley crew of established musicians who literally have no business being anywhere near Lydon, let alone in a studio with him or with one another. Well, maybe that made perfect sense, given Lydon's ability to baffle. The hardest working man in the avant-garde, Bill Laswell, produced and played bass, which isn't too much of a stretch. But Steve Vai and Ryuichi Sakamoto? Or better yet, Ginger Baker? (Especially odd since PiL played an April Fools' joke on the press by announcing his membership in the early '80s.) Strange bedfellows indeed, but the lineup makes for a surprisingly cohesive (if mediocre) rock record. "Rise" proves that "This Is Not a Love Song" was no fluke, not Lydon's lone stab at pop accessibility. Successfully marrying rock with Celtic folk (a heavier Dexy's Midnight Runners?), Lydon's chorus is his most hospitable yet. Opener "FFF" and "Home" are other strong points, just as driving and defiant as anything from PiL's previous output. The former is as good as hard rock got in 1985. But Album can be found lacking in its reliance on outright professionalism and polish, emphasizing skill over craft. Vai's scorched shredding likely repelled Lydon's fans more than any of PiL's earlier attempts to alienate and frustrate. The 90-second wailing over closer "Ease" is anything but; at most points, Vai's playing just doesn't fit. Unfortunately, Yellow Magic Orchestra member Sakamoto pops up only a couple times. His talent is pretty much wasted here. On the whole, Album (or Compact Disc, or Cassette) is just as generic as its title. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1979 | Virgin Records

PiL managed to avoid boundaries for the first four years of their existence, and Metal Box (issued in the U.S. as Second Edition) is undoubtedly the apex. It's a hallmark of uncompromising, challenging post-punk, hardly sounding like anything of the past, present, or future. Sure, there were touchstones that got their imaginations running -- the bizarreness of Captain Beefheart, the open and rhythmic spaces of Can, and the dense pulses of Lee Perry's productions fueled their creative fires -- but what they achieved with their second record is a completely unique hour of avant-garde noise. Originally packaged in a film canister as a trio of 12" records played at 45 rpm, the bass and treble are pegged at 11 throughout, with nary a tinge of midrange to be found. It's all scrapes and throbs (dubscrapes?), supplanted by John Lydon's caterwauling about such subjects as his dying mother, resentment, and murder. Guitarist Keith Levene splatters silvery, violent, percussive shards of metallic scrapes onto the canvas, much like a one-armed Jackson Pollock. Jah Wobble and Richard Dudanski lay down a molasses-thick rhythmic foundation throughout that's just as funky as Can's Czukay/Leibezeit and Chic's Edwards/Rodgers. It's alien dance music. Metal Box might not be recognized as a groundbreaking record with the same reverence as Never Mind the Bollocks, and you certainly can't trace numerous waves of bands who wouldn't have existed without it like the Sex Pistols record. But like a virus, its tones have sent miasmic reverberations through a much broader scope of artists and genres. [Metal Box was issued in the States in 1980 with different artwork and cheaper packaging under the title Second Edition; the track sequence differs as well. The U.K. reissue of Metal Box on CD boasts better sound quality than the Second Edition CD.] © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 28, 2012 | PiL Official

Enabled by the expiration of obstructive contracts and a little income from an appearance in a butter ad, John Lydon revived PiL in 2009. Consisting of alums Bruce Smith (1986-1990) and Lu Edmonds (1986-1988), along with bassist Scott Firth, Lydon's band toured steadily from December 2009 through 2011 and released this, its first album since 1992's That What Is Not, in 2012. Those later set lists -- one of which was documented on ALiFE 2009 -- leaned heavily toward PiL's first two albums. Playing that material seems to have affected the sound of This Is PiL, though it is no attempt at replication. It's more like a stylistic evolution -- one that's easier on the average set of ears than the droning dread of the first album's "Theme" or the mangled dub of Metal Box's "Poptones." Firth's liquid throb replaces Jah Wobble's rumbling and penetrating basslines. Edmonds' flexible guitar style carries significantly less violence than Keith Levene's caustic slashing. Smith's rhythms are more intricate and musical than PiL's early thud-discoid "drummer by committee" approach. Lydon, sharp and direct as ever, shows occasional signs of softening, as heard in a handful of wistful lines laced through otherwise forceful songs like "One Drop" and "Human" ("I miss those roses, those English roses"). However, he sticks to his seething wordplay with far greater frequency. This is exemplified by the standout "Terra-Gate," a vivid rant with as much intensity as Metal Box's "Chant" ("Take what you make, what you hate, integrate, into hate, it's too late," etc.). It's one of the PiL's best albums. Just as important, it has as much attitude -- if somewhat tempered and pointed in some new directions -- as anything else Lydon has recorded. And it begins with a belch and ends with a wail. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1992 | Virgin Records

Former Sex Pistol vocalist John Lydon once again unleashed his Public Image Ltd. project, this time with a more basic, unrelenting rock & roll attack than ever before. The audio assault of guitarist John McGeoch and bassist Allan Dias perfectly complements Lydon's frenzied, strangled bleating throughout. As usual, Lydon succeeds in being all of satirical and fatalistic, confrontational and self-deprecating. The album's opening words set the tone: "What does it mean/What does anything mean." It's spat out as a statement rather than a question. "Covered" unpredictably tosses sampled vocals, bluesy harmonica, and Tower of Power horns into the mix. That What Is Not can be a difficult PiL to swallow, but the heady side-effects make the effort worthwhile. © Roch Parisien /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | One Up

Most who own Plastic Box probably use the second half as coasters. Those who don't probably get headaches when listening to the first two, and a select few find much to love about the whole thing. As if conceding to the consensus that PiL's early years were their best, the first half is devoted to the band's first three studio LPs cut over four years, while the second half covers the remainder. Listeners get the entirety of Public Image/First Edition sans "Fodderstompf." The majority of Metal Box (issued as Second Edition in the U.S.) is included, with three of the original versions sacrificed for Peel Session counterparts that really take the cake. "Careering" is especially wonderful and harrowing, arguably the collective's finest recorded moment. Keith Levene goes bonkers with the keyboards, perhaps fostering the increased intensity amongst the remaining members. The 12" mix of "Swan Lake" ("Death Disco") gets the box set upgrade too, as well as a couple other worthwhile Metal Box outtakes. Closing out the second disc is the entirety of The Flowers of Romance, sequentially shuffled with an additional non-album track. The second half of Plastic Box hits upon each of the remaining studio LPs, with the odd rarity, single mix and Peel Session thrown in for completist bait. For those who want improved sound over their early CD issues, the money spent is a smart investment. A quick comparison of the first 20 seconds of "Annalisa" to the version found on an old copy of Public Image should be evidence enough; the bassline of "Chant" makes the gut feel as if it's being endlessly pummelled by a bouncing battering ram. Though vast and relatively pricey, Plastic Box is an excellent introduction, if only for the adventurous. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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9

Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin Catalogue

9 features essentially the same group of characters found on Happy?, with only Lu Edmonds having left the fold (though he did contribute to the writing on each song). Seven studio albums, seven lineups -- Lydon failed yet again to keep the same people together for more than one record. But is this notion really of major consequence? Not really, and Lydon probably prides himself in it. Thankfully, 9 retained the Happy? core of Bruce Smith, John McGeoch, and Allan Dias. If Happy? and various points prior were flirtations with accessible dance-pop, 9 was a bear hug embrace of it. 9 is split between a modern rock record and a dance producer-derived one, but credit both producers and band for making it a successful combination; on paper, the game plan looks like an accident waiting to happen. Stephen Hague was responsible for just over half of the album's production, with E.T. Thorngren working on the remainder and Nellee Hooper mixing one of Thorngren's productions. 9 is easily PiL's slickest yet, but there's substance to balance it out. The catchy "Disappointed" provided the band's greatest success in the States, with plenty of airplay on modern rock radio stations and light rotation on MTV. Other highlights: the dubby, almost Police-like near-instrumental "U.S.L.S. 1" and the surprising use of acoustic guitar on "Worry." Lowlights: the slightly goofy "Sand Castles in the Snow," the oddball fusion of Asiatic keyboards and late-'80s R&B on "Like That," the character play of Lydon in "Warrior." © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | EMI Catalogue

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Punk / New Wave - Released September 19, 2011 | Concert Live Ltd

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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin Catalogue

Artist

Public Image Ltd. in the magazine
  • The best of PIL
    The best of PIL To help {John Lydon celebrate the fortieth birthday of Public Image Ltd (PIL), there’s nothing better than a good old treasure chest filled with singles, rarities and concert extracts.}