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Rock - Released November 30, 1979 | Pink Floyd Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Co-directed by Roger Waters and David Gilmour, The Wall, Pink Floyd's eleventh studio album, was released in the UK on November 30, 1979 on the Harvest record label and in the United States on December 8, 1979 on Columbia. It is the last studio album with the line-up of David Gilmour (guitar), Roger Waters (bass guitar and lyricist), Richard Wright (keyboards) and Nick Mason (drums). In 1977, Roger Waters — singer, bassist, lyricist, composer and arranger of Pink Floyd — sketched on a sheet of paper a wall separating audience and musicians. Based on this projection, he calls on Bob Ezrin (producer of Lou Reed, Alice Cooper, Kiss, etc.) to help him realize his project. A double album with a strong concept was released and was a massive success — more than thirty million copies sold. A real introspection of Waters' life, the album combines fiction and reality through the story of Pink, a young rock star (who in fact symbolizes Waters himself) prey to his demons and who, little by little, builds a chimerical wall around him to cut himself off from the world. This particularly ambitious rock opera essentially bears the emotional mark of Roger Waters (evocation of his absent father, his abusive mother and the rigidity of a school system that traumatized him for life). The Wall was first remastered in 1994 in the UK by EMI. Then in 1997 the Columbia firm remastered the album, with better sound quality than EMI's, to be released in the United States, Canada, Australia, South America and Japan. Shortly after the album's twentieth anniversary, Capitol relaunched the 1997 edition in the United States in 2000 taking over the European remastering, and EMI did the same in Canada, Australia, South America and the United States. Japan. In 2011, the album was painstakingly remastered by James Guthrie (the sound engineer and co-producer of the original album) and Joel Plante, at das boot recording studio located in Lake Tahoe, California. (Qobuz / GG) 
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Rock - Released March 1, 1973 | Pink Floyd Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
By condensing the sonic explorations of Meddle to actual songs and adding a lush, immaculate production to their trippiest instrumental sections, Pink Floyd inadvertently designed their commercial breakthrough with Dark Side of the Moon. The primary revelation of Dark Side of the Moon is what a little focus does for the band. Roger Waters wrote a series of songs about mundane, everyday details which aren't that impressive by themselves, but when given the sonic backdrop of Floyd's slow, atmospheric soundscapes and carefully placed sound effects, they achieve an emotional resonance. But what gives the album true power is the subtly textured music, which evolves from ponderous, neo-psychedelic art rock to jazz fusion and blues-rock before turning back to psychedelia. It's dense with detail, but leisurely paced, creating its own dark, haunting world. Pink Floyd may have better albums than Dark Side of the Moon, but no other record defines them quite as well as this one. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 30, 2014 | Pink Floyd Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Exceptional Sound Recording
The Division Bell is the 14th Pink Floyd album, recorded in 1993 at several locations (Astoria recording Studio, Britannia Row Studios, Metropolis Studios, The Creek recording studios) and released in the UK in March 1994 on the EMI Records. What remains of Pink Floyd when this album is released ? Not much, will say some fans of the first hour... But if the now leader David Gilmour does not shine with an overflowing originality for this second post-Roger Waters album, he nevertheless manages to radiate his guitarist lyricism in nostalgic compositions like more modern. The result is a record that has improved over the years and of which Parlophone releases a version remastered by James Guthrie, Joel Plante and Doug Sax from the analog tapes, on the occasion of its 20th anniversary. © CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 15, 1975 | Pink Floyd Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Pink Floyd followed the commercial breakthrough of Dark Side of the Moon with Wish You Were Here, a loose concept album about and dedicated to their founding member Syd Barrett. The record unfolds gradually, as the jazzy textures of "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" reveal its melodic motif, and in its leisurely pace, the album shows itself to be a warmer record than its predecessor. Musically, it's arguably even more impressive, showcasing the group's interplay and David Gilmour's solos in particular. And while it's short on actual songs, the long, winding soundscapes are constantly enthralling. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released October 2, 1970 | Pink Floyd Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Appearing after the sprawling, unfocused double-album set Ummagumma, Atom Heart Mother may boast more focus, even a concept, yet that doesn't mean it's more accessible. If anything, this is the most impenetrable album Pink Floyd released while on Harvest, which also makes it one of the most interesting of the era. Still, it may be an acquired taste even for fans, especially since it kicks off with a side-long, 23-minute extended orchestral piece that may not seem to head anywhere, but is often intriguing, more in what it suggests than what it achieves. Then, on the second side, Roger Waters, David Gilmour, and Rick Wright have a song apiece, winding up with the group composition "Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast" wrapping it up. Of these, Waters begins developing the voice that made him the group's lead songwriter during their classic era with "If," while Wright has an appealingly mannered, very English psychedelic fantasia on "Summer 68," and Gilmour's "Fat Old Sun" meanders quietly before ending with a guitar workout that leaves no impression. "Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast," the 12-minute opus that ends the album, does the same thing, floating for several minutes before ending on a drawn-out jam that finally gets the piece moving. So, there are interesting moments scattered throughout the record, and the work that initially seems so impenetrable winds up being Atom Heart Mother's strongest moment. That it lasts an entire side illustrates that Pink Floyd was getting better with the larger picture instead of the details, since the second side just winds up falling off the tracks, no matter how many good moments there are. This lack of focus means Atom Heart Mother will largely be for cultists, but its unevenness means there's also a lot to cherish here. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 5, 1967 | Pink Floyd Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The title of Pink Floyd's debut album is taken from a chapter in Syd Barrett's favorite children's book, The Wind in the Willows, and the lyrical imagery of The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is indeed full of colorful, childlike, distinctly British whimsy, albeit filtered through the perceptive lens of LSD. Barrett's catchy, melodic acid pop songs are balanced with longer, more experimental pieces showcasing the group's instrumental freak-outs, often using themes of space travel as metaphors for hallucinogenic experiences -- "Astronomy Domine" is a poppier number in this vein, but tracks like "Interstellar Overdrive" are some of the earliest forays into what has been tagged space rock. But even though Barrett's lyrics and melodies are mostly playful and humorous, the band's music doesn't always bear out those sentiments -- in addition to Rick Wright's eerie organ work, dissonance, chromaticism, weird noises, and vocal sound effects are all employed at various instances, giving the impression of chaos and confusion lurking beneath the bright surface. The Piper at the Gates of Dawn successfully captures both sides of psychedelic experimentation -- the pleasures of expanding one's mind and perception, and an underlying threat of mental disorder and even lunacy; this duality makes Piper all the more compelling in light of Barrett's subsequent breakdown, and ranks it as one of the best psychedelic albums of all time. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 26, 1996 | Pink Floyd Records

Distinctions Stereophile: Record To Die For
Since Relics is a compilation and not a regular studio album, it tends to be overlooked when thought of as one of Pink Floyd's better releases. It might not be regarded as a classic psychedelic masterpiece in the manner of The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, and it certainly won't ever achieve the multiple platinum status of Dark Side of the Moon, but it's a pretty good place to start with the band's early catalog. Originally issued in 1971, Relics culls from the band's first five singles (two A-sides and three B-sides, including the non-album pop classics "See Emily Play" and "Arnold Layne") and picks album material that capitalizes on the band's versatility while making it a thoroughly palatable listen. From Piper, you get the goofy childishness of "Bike" and the mesmerizing "Interstellar Overdrive," one of the band's trademark instrumental freak-outs; "The Nile Song," taken from the More soundtrack, is one of the heaviest songs the band recorded. A little bit of everything that made early Pink Floyd can be found here. Without a doubt, the disc is an essential part of the band's discography, not to be disregarded due to its overlap with studio album material. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 22, 1988 | Parlophone UK

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While the end of the 80s signalled the end for a lot of great bands who had been around for the last ten or fifteen years, it meant rebirth for Pink Floyd. The group had already lived two lives – one with and one without Syd Barrett. When Roger Waters left in 1985 he tried as hard as he could to stop the band from using the same name for future projects. After a long legal battle, Gilmour, Mason and Wright won the right to carry on using Pink Floyd. A Momentary Lapse of Reason came out in 1987, the first post-Waters album. A phenomenal tour followed which gave us the live album Delicate Sound of Thunder the following year. The album was different from the group’s other records for a number of reasons. Firstly, it was Pink Floyds first real live album (yes, there was Ummagumma but that was made up of two discs - one studio, one live). Secondly, it was a hugely successful tour, largely thanks to their use of both audio and visuals – images had long played a crucial role in their music (the film Live at Pompeii released 16 years earlier is a good example of this). And finally, it was the first album to ever be played in space thanks to the Soviet astronauts who took it aboard the Soyuz TM-7 shuttle when travelling to the Mir space station. This completed remixed re-release takes the acclaimed live album into a new era. Having stood out before for its (almost too) perfect sound recording and mixing, Delicate Sound of Thunder can now be enjoyed in a remixed hi-fi version that makes you feel like you’re right there in the mobile studio doing the live recording. It’s a unique experience for the senses, even if it does slightly do away with their psychedelic touch. Pink Floyd now belonged to Gilmour and he chose to focus a large part of the concert on A Momentary Lapse of Reason before going for an all-too-short segue into their best hits, mostly coming from Dark Side of the Moon. Despite this decision (which might be a bit annoying for die-hard fans) there are enough classics from albums like Shine On You Crazy Diamond, One of These Days and Wish You Were Here to keep you satisfied. In 1988, media formats forced the band to remove some songs from their tracklist due to a lack of space. This remixed version restores the forgotten tracks to reveal a complete concert with the addition of 7 songs and guitar solos that were shortened in the first version. This gives added flavour to a performance that went down in history alongside their other live album Pulse which was released in 1995 and was met with resounding success. This record just goes to show that Pink Floyd’s concerts really were immersive experiences. © Chief Brody/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 13, 2019 | Rhino - Parlophone

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What a surprise! After The Later Years: 1987-2019 compilation, here comes the rest of the huge box set dedicated to the band’s David Gilmour-era music, kick started by the departure of Roger Waters. The Later Years follows on from the retrospective which focuses on the early years (1967-1972) of the British band, released in 2016. Remastered by Gilmour and Andy Jackson, this exciting collection features the whole of A Momentary Lapse of Reason (1987), the band’s first studio album without Waters, as well as a double live disc of Delicate Sound of Thunder from 1988. Finally, the fourth volume reveals five live tracks, including three flamboyant performances from Pink Floyd’s first iteration: One of These Days from Meddle (1971) in Hanover in 1994, the psychedelic Astronomy Domine composed by Syd Barrett for The Piper at the Gate of Dawn (1967) and performed in Miami in the same year, as well as Run Like Hell from The Wall (1979) performed in Atlanta in 1987. Even more gems: seven unheard tracks from 1994, from the Division Bell era. Superb. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 30, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Regarded by many as one of their finest live performances, at least of the post-Roger Waters era, Pink Floyd's appearance at 1990's Knebworth Festival was buoyed by a casual sense of camaraderie and freshness. Having taken a much-needed break after two years of globe-trotting in service of 1987's A Momentary Lapse of Reason, the one-off show in rural Hertfordshire marked the band's return to the stage. Considered to be the festival's headliners over fellow U.K. legends like Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, and Phil Collins, the Floyd dazzled nearly 120,000 fans with career bullet points like "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" and "Comfortably Numb" along with a more recent entry in David Gilmour's sonorous guitar showcase, "Sorrow." Even the band itself has been said to have felt a certain magic in their performance, which, until its inclusion on the mammoth 2019 Later Years box set, had only been available in bootleg form. This 2020 edition, remixed by Gilmour and engineer Andy Jackson, should help cement Knebworth's place in the group's expansive canon. © Timothy Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 7, 2014 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released November 5, 1971 | Pink Floyd Records

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Rock - Released May 29, 1995 | Pink Floyd Records

Pink Floyd claim they had no intention of recording another live album when they began the Division Bell tour, but performing The Dark Side of the Moon in its entirety convinced the group to release another double-live set, called Pulse. There's no question that the group is comprised of talented musicians, including the number of studio professionals that augmented the trio on tour. Whether they're inspired musicians is up to debate. A large part of Pink Floyd's live show is based on the always impressive visuals; on the Division Bell tour, they closed each show with an unprecedented laser extravaganza. In order for the visuals and the music to coincide, the group needed to play the sets as tightly as possible, with little improvisation. Consequently, an audio version of this concert, separated from the visuals, is disappointing. Pink Floyd play the greatest hits and the new songs professionally, yet the versions differ only slightly from the original recordings, making Pulse a tepid experience. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 23, 1977 | Pink Floyd Records

With pigs, dogs and sheep, Pink Floyd’s Animals is a nod towards George Orwell’s classic Animal Farm. Of course, both works are only about one species in the end: Homosapiens. Released in January 1977, the album puts society under the microscope and dissects the ugliness and brutality of human nature. The record came at a time of huge social unrest in England: class tensions were on the rise, unemployment was skyrocketing and racial divide had hit a high-water mark. Anger was in the air and it bled into every corner of Animals.Lyrically speaking, this record holds some of the most unyielding, sardonic and iconoclastic poetry that Waters has ever penned. On the 17-minute epic Dogs we are introduced to the predatory businessmen - the cut-throat corporate stooges who will flash you an easy smile and then stab you in the back. Amid dog barks and relentless guitar strums, David Gilmour unleashes some of the finest solos of his career. They’re bluesy, progressive and brilliantly harrowing. Next up is Pigs (Three Different Ones) which details the ruthless, totalitarian leaders who perpetuate injustice and oppression while maintaining a grip on power. Once again, the instrumentals are dark with dystopian synths, driving bass lines and menacing pig snorts played on a talk box. The lyrics describe three swinish leaders. One of the ‘pigs’ is the morality watchdog Mary Whitehouse while the “f***ed up old hag” who “radiates cold shards of broken glass” alludes to Margaret Thatcher (the leader of the opposition at the time and a target in other Pink Floyd songs). Down at the bottom of the pecking order are the meek, mindless and unquestioning herds of Sheep. Opening with an understated doodle from Richard Wright on the keys, Waters’ stretched-out vocals crossfade into synths, giving the song that warped, hallucinatory feel that the Floyd do so well. Sheep contains a revised version of Psalm 23, continuing the traditional “The Lord is my shepherd” with classic Pink Floyd cynicism: “he maketh me to hang on hooks in high places and converteth me to lamb cutlets”.The album is book-ended by two glimmers of hope in an otherwise bleak world, marking the band’s first love songs. Originally composed as a single track and later split in two, the message on Pigs On The Wing is clear: love thy neighbour, care for each other, because that’s what makes life worth living amid all the bulls**t. An album – and message - that’s just as relevant today as it was in the 70s. © Abi Church/Qobuz
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Rock - Released March 21, 1983 | Pink Floyd Records

Four years separate this album from its predecessor The Wall which placed Pink Floyd at the height of its success. A well named Final Cut (a requiem for the post war dream), which will be the last disc with Roger Waters, solitary author of this concept-album which he interprets in its almost entirety — and the only one where keyboardist Richard Wright does not appear. Like a first solo opus? No doubt... His grandiloquence, put at the service of a frenzied anti-militarism (England and Argentina then clashed in the Falklands), is reminiscent of The Wall of which he reworked certain compositions that were discarded at the time. The result is an essay, lyrical at will.
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Rock - Released November 29, 2019 | Pink Floyd Music

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After returning to their Early Years (1965-1972), the Floyd turns their attention towards the Gilmour years, open after Roger Waters’ departure. The enormous 16-disc box set has been refined down to this digital version. However, The Later Years 1987-2019 is worth its weight in gold, as over the course of twelve tracks it selects the best of the best of studio and live recordings, remixed by David Gilmour and Andy Jackson, and they remain outstanding to this day. Included is the performance from Knebworth 1990, a charity concert which also featured Paul McCartney, Robert Plant & Jimmy Page, Dire Straits, Genesis, Eric Clapton and Tears For Fears, and which punctuated Pink Floyd’s tour of A Momentary Lapse of Reason (1987), the band’s first release without Waters and whose opening consists of the eleven minutes of Shine on You Crazy Diamond. Furthermore, One Slip from the live album Delicate Sound of Thunder (1988) has been improved by new recordings on the drums by Nick Mason and on the keyboard by Wright. From Division Bell (1994) there is an instrumental version of Marooned Jam, Lost for Words and a demo of High Hopes. A real must have. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 8, 1987 | Pink Floyd Records

After a protracted legal battle over the rights to the Pink Floyd name, David Gilmour, Nick Mason, and Richard Wright released 1987's A Momentary Lapse of Reason despite Roger Waters' protests. Retaining collaborators from Floyd's past (like producer Bob Ezrin), this Gilmour-led version of the band crafted a number of songs that were as cerebral and introspective as anything Floyd had done in the past. The first single, "Learning to Fly," served as the unofficial anthem for this latest chapter of Pink Floyd. The Andy Mackay/Gilmour-penned "One Slip" uses the requisite bells and whistles along with Tony Levin's impressive stick solo to guarantee it a prominent place in the band's canon. "The Dogs of War" and "On the Turning Away" are perfect commentaries on the conservative mindset shaping the '80s at the time. The former is an ominous screed composed at a time when the Cold War was still a reality, and the latter is a swipe against the self-absorption of the Me Decade. © Rovi Staff /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 12, 2001 | Pink Floyd Records

Being the quintessential album rock band, Pink Floyd hasn't had much luck with "best-of" and "greatest-hits" compilations, like A Collection of Great Dance Songs and the bizarro follow-up, Works. Since both of those were released in the early '80s (and time travel being unavailable even to Pink Floyd), they obviously left out any tracks from the post-Roger Waters era albums. While countless hours in dorm rooms have been spent laboring over whether or not the post-Waters recordings should even be considered the "real Floyd," the later albums nonetheless stand as a further progression in the band's evolution and warrant recognition. The 2001 release Echoes: The Best of Pink Floyd does just that, sequencing the tracks non-chronologically in an effort to place more emphasis on the individual songs as opposed to the era they're from. Unfortunately, the effect is rather jarring when the songs transition from the clinical mid-'90s sound of "High Hopes" directly into the psychedelic groove of the much earlier "Bike." Interestingly, as is the case with most of their albums (but a rarity in "hits" compilations), most of the tracks fade into one another; the hum of "Keep Talking" segueing into the bleating of "Sheep," making for an intriguing listen from one song to the next. There are many highlights on this collection: the inclusion of the Floyd holy grail "When the Tigers Broke Free," a sweeping Waters military dirge that has only appeared in the film The Wall, and the fascinating "Shine on You Crazy Diamond, Pts. 1-7," which has never before been released without the break in the middle (but conspicuously missing parts eight and nine). The confusing inclusion of "The Fletcher Memorial Home" (possibly just to cover something from The Final Cut) and three songs from the decidedly mediocre Division Bell stand out as obvious head-scratchers, making the die-hard Pink Floyd fan wonder if compiler James Guthrie was really clear on what this album should represent. Guthrie's job was unfortunately doomed from the start; since Pink Floyd's strength has always been in the band's rich, sprawling albums, listening to selections cut and chopped from here and there makes it almost like watching three-minute segments from Citizen Kane, Gone With the Wind, and Apocalypse Now, knowing full well that they hold together much better as whole works. Still, Echoes is nearly the best possible assembly of the band's individual songs one could hope for, and collectors and completists should be overjoyed. That being said, anyone just getting into this group's fascinating sound would be much better off starting with Dark Side of the Moon, then working forward, then backward from there: the time honored system of hungrily consuming the Pink Floyd catalog that has stood for generations. © Zac Johnson /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 25, 1969 | Pink Floyd Records

Released on 7th November, 1969, Pink Floyd’s fourth album Ummagumma is a disorienting head trip of an album: one part live recordings, the other a bizarre, psychedelic and rather cinematic collection of solo experiments. The first disc’s purely instrumental concerts stem from Birmingham’s Mothers Club and Manchester’s College of Commerce and were recorded earlier that year. The sound is raw and crude, offering a glimpse of Pink Floyd’s early days on stage. By the time Nick Wright’s ominous piano opens the curtain on the second disc, it’s clear the mood has changed from spaced-out jams to a kind of freaky folk opera. The band members’ rotating positions on the album cover (designed by their long-term collaborators Hipgnosis) give you a clue as to what’s in store: each artist had half an album side to compose their own work without any input from the others. The four-part Sysyphus by Nick Wright is intense and progressive, packed with an array of synths, organs and pianos. Roger Waters’ Grantchester Meadows and Several Species of Small Furry Animals Gathered Together in a Cave and Grooving with a Pict contains bird songs and warped voice samples played both forwards and backwards at varying speeds, crafting a lyrical world that’s peaceful and unnerving in equal measure. When David Gilmour takes the reins for The Narrow Way we’re treated to a meandering stream of vocals, guitar strums and solos that flow neither this way nor that. For the album closer, The Grand Vizier’s Garden Party by Nick Mason starts off as an introductory flute piece (played by his wife) before galloping head-first into a looping frenzy of beats and distortions. Initially viewed as a success, the group look back on this record as “pretentious”. In an interview, Nick Mason commented “in hindsight, it rather proves that we were better when we worked together than when we worked as individuals. There are nice moments and odd good bits but as an album it’s pretty fragmented…”. It’s not an easy listen, but then it’s not trying to be. If it’s sheer psychedelia you’re after, look no further than Ummagumma. © Abi Church/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 11, 2016 | Pink Floyd Records

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A double-disc distillation of the massive box The Early Years 1965-1972, The Early Years 1967-1972 condenses that 28-disc set into a 27-track compilation. Naturally, most of the real rarities remain exiled to the big box, but that's fair: only the diehards will recognize the importance of Floyd's collaboration with artist John Latham. Instead, The Early Years 1967-1972 tells the same tale as The Early Years 1967-1972 but in an easily digestible form. The double-disc relies relatively heavily on familiar songs -- it opens with "Arnold Layne" and "See Emily Play," perhaps the two best-known Syd Barrett songs, and finds space for "Careful with That Axe, Eugene" and "Free Four" -- but what distinguishes 1967-1972 is that it's the first early Floyd compilation to trace their journey from Barrett's warped psychedelia to the majestic art rock of the early '70s. Some essential songs are missing -- this doesn't sample the albums, after all, so songs as varied as "Astronomy Domine," "Let There Be More Light," and "One of These Days" are all absent -- but the repetition of "Careful with That Axe, Eugene" and "Embryo" illustrates how the band rapidly gained confidence and ambition, which is essentially the story of this compilation and its parent set. Certainly, the details of the box are missed, but on its own terms, The Early Years 1967-1972 is absorbing: it illustrates how Pink Floyd became Pink Floyd. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

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