Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD£12.99

Sacred Vocal Music - Released March 12, 2012 | deutsche harmonia mundi

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica
While we don't know quite how Jacob Clemens got his nickname of "non Papa" – some see it as a sign of his reformist sympathies, others as an indication of his rather dissolute life, while the majority of commentators are still scratching their heads – we know enough about his life to confirm that it was indeed quite dissolute. One of his employers wrote that he was a "great drunkard and an ill-liver"; a contract stipulated that he had to live "per modum probae", that is, decently. But the fact is that over the course of his too-short career – he died at the age of 40, around 1555 – he had to his name 15 masses, as many magnificats, 233 motets (almost all religious) a good hundred songs, be they in French or Dutch, 160 psalms in Dutch, the "Souterliedekens", generally using popular songs as their "cantus firmus". In short, it's a magnificent body of work, in which the equally magnificent Huelgas Ensemble (a Belgian formation, despite the Hispanic-sounding name) was spoiled for choice: so much so that they have plumped for several works from each of these categories: songs in French, Souterliedekens, motets, and extracts from masses, all offering the listener a large sample of his extravagant and sumptuous art, from Josquin to Lassus – and the latter was greatly influenced by Jacob Clemens, as it happens. © SM/Qobuz
From
HI-RES£14.99
CD£12.99

Classical - Released May 24, 2019 | Sony Music Classical Local

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Without the help of blaring drums or castanets, culture-filled aesthete Paul van Nevel gives the opportunity to hear the music that Christopher Columbus heard during his travels and adventurous life. This has resulted in a rigorous selection of (many unknown) a capella works, by Italian and Spanish composers from the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Beginning with childhood memories of Christopher Columbus (a carnival song evoking an erotic joke about chimney sweeps), the album ends with pieces by Agricola most likely heard by the navigator at the end of his final voyage in 1506. This virtual musical journey begins in 15th century Venice and reaches the court of Ferdinand and Isabella in Madrid, Seville, Cordoba and Valladolid. This offers an exciting programme benefitting from the exceptional quality of singers of the Huelgas Ensemble, specialised in medieval and Renaissance polyphony and founded in 1971 by Paul van Nevel. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
CD£6.99

Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released November 22, 2007 | harmonia mundi

Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
From
HI-RES£14.99
CD£12.99

Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released August 17, 2018 | Sony Music Classical Local

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The French printer-publisher Christophe Plantin (1520-1589), who has lived in Antwerp more or less all of his adult life, is not just anyone. He is credited with some two thousand publications, an absolutely astounding number in this era in which everything was done by hand, including the press done page after page, and yet he’s managed to publish a new book approximately every week during his 34-year career, with more than a thousand copies for each—up to eight thousand copies for his Hebraic Bible. His workshop included sixteen hand presses, served by thirty-two printers, twenty typographers, three proofreaders and many servants of all kinds: a true company. His opus magnum is a Bible in five languages: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Aramaean and Syriac. He is also credited with works in the fields of medicine, botany, cartography, anatomy, mathematics, religion of course… And yes, also music! Because he published several major partitions, gathering contemporary sacred works from Jacobus De Kerle, Palestrina, Philippus De Monte, as well as several chansonniers gathering pieces from Andries Pervenage, Claude Le Jeune and colleagues. It is in this incredible stock that the beautiful Ensemble Huelgas drew, alternating between profane and sacred, choral and soloist, a sort of condensed musical Renaissance oscillating between ferocious Catholics (Antwerp was then under Spanish domination, and Philip II was very touchy about religion) and rebellious Protestants. © SM/Qobuz
From
HI-RES£14.99
CD£12.99

Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released November 18, 2016 | deutsche harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
From
CD£6.99

Classical - Released June 7, 2011 | harmonia mundi

From
CD£10.49

Classical - Released September 12, 1995 | Sony Classical

From
CD£5.49

Secular Vocal Music - Released November 9, 2001 | harmonia mundi

From
CD£9.49

Classical - Released March 26, 1999 | harmonia mundi

From
CD£12.99

Classical - Released September 12, 1995 | Sony Classical

From
CD£12.99

Classical - Released April 19, 1999 | Sony Classical

Alexander Agricola was viewed in his time as one of the major musical artists of his day; in old sources, he is referred to as "the divine Alexander" -- a source dating to 1503 states that Agricola could "make music shine clearer than the finest silver." That his reputation, even among many experts in Renaissance music, has not survived since Agricola's death of the plague in Valladolid in 1506 seems a quirk of history. There are many attributes of Agricola that are appealing to modern listeners attuned to Renaissance polyphony, particularly his highly unconventional approach to harmony; brilliant, flowing textures; and intense emotionalism. Paul van Nevel and Huelgas Ensemble's Agricola: A Secret Labyrinth, while not perfect, is a huge step in the right direction to reclaim Alexander Agricola for twenty-first century listeners. Van Nevel and Huelgas Ensemble have long proven surprisingly consistent in the excellence of their performance of late Medieval and early Renaissance music -- Agricola: A Secret Labyrinth would fall into the latter category. Therefore, it is equally surprising that the disc gets off to such a weak start in the florid two-part piece Gaudeamus omnes in Domino. The soloist is uncertain with the music, drops out notes, and generally does not get this one off the ground, yet the remainder of the disc is much better. Moreover, it is certainly well worth hearing -- check out the hair-raising sonorities in the "Sanctus" from Missa Re-fa-mi-re-fa or the pre-Mannerist sound of the Canzona Fortuna desperata, the one piece that comes closest for Agricola to being a "hit" by virtue of the infrequent performances it has gained. Perhaps conscious of Agricola's severe shortcomings in terms of recorded literature, van Nevel elects to patch together a mass out of individual movements from five of Agricola's eight mass settings. The pieces do flow together nicely, but listeners should be advised that this so-called "Missa Guazzabuglio" is a pastiche of mass movements and not a genuine work. In terms of performance, aside from the hesitant opening piece, van Nevel and Huelgas make the best case for Agricola's dark and rather bitter-sounding music. With any luck, Huelgas Ensemble's Agricola: A Secret Labyrinth will help open the door for others to follow, as Agricola's extraordinarily large and varied output, available in print since 1970, remains an uninvestigated labyrinth in its own right in which we are far from finding the exit. © TiVo
From
CD£9.49

Classical - Released October 6, 2003 | harmonia mundi

From
CD£9.49

Classical - Released November 6, 2007 | harmonia mundi

From
CD£12.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1990 | Sony Classical

From
CD£12.99

Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released January 1, 1992 | Sony Classical

From
CD£9.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2002 | harmonia mundi

From
CD£8.99

Classical - Released July 22, 2007 | Challenge Classics

From
CD£9.49

Classical - Released July 31, 2007 | harmonia mundi

From
CD£9.49

Classical - Released April 9, 2001 | harmonia mundi

From
CD£9.49

Classical - Released November 6, 2007 | harmonia mundi