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Alternative & Indie - Released October 18, 2019 | Domino Recording Co

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How nice it is to find a musician who doesn’t exhaust himself by releasing loads of overly long tracks! We find ten songs here, and not one of them exceeds four and a half minutes. The result is a beautiful, compelling album that recalls the 1970s and 80s. Patrick Watson has a gift for structure and a taste for purity, which he proved in his enchanting album Adventures in Your Own Backyard in 2012. This new ten-episode fresco is drenched in melancholy, and the minimalist piano parts reflect the neoclassical influence that seems to be invading everything today, led by the likes of Jean-Michel Blais (Watson’s compatriot) and Alexis Ffrench to Dirk Maassen and, to a lesser extent, Nils Frahm. The influence is perhaps most obvious in the pulsing, repetitive track Broken, which feels like a slow tarantella with a beautiful dramatic rise. The next track Turn Out the Lights heals and soothes, releasing any previous tensions, particularly thanks to the melodic contours and more varied instrumentation. This new album Wave is largely homogeneous, enhanced by Patrick Watson’s husky, sensual voice. However, after the first nine nostalgia-tinged ethereal songs, one would never have expected such a lavish finale: Here Comes the River is like a present-day Imagine. It’s an unforgettable piece, and perhaps too short after all. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 11, 2015 | Domino Recording Co

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Unlike Patrick Watson's previous release, the home-recorded Adventures in Your Own Backyard, Love Songs for Robots was recorded at Capitol Studios in Los Angeles and Studio Pierre Marchand in Montreal. While the result may not be quite as sparse or intimate, despite a much shorter list of instruments and collaborators, it's at least as intense and melancholic. Also unlike Adventures, synths are featured prominently on the record. Love Songs for Robots' overriding emotion is one of yearning, with minor keys, sobbing electric guitars including slides, and wistful, dissonant synths, such as on the eerie "Good Morning Mr. Wolf" ("Getting tired of wasting worries/Why not let the worries worry for themselves for a change"). Similarly, emotive vocals and guitar affect the stunning, distorted blues lament "Turn into the Noise." Bending, humming pitches from all instrumentation create a more ambient setting for the album and an otherworldly effect, like a fictional chamber pop band from the Twin Peaks universe. The elegant, meandering "Hearts" mixes acoustic and electric tones to slowly develop a sweet folk tune into a driving, modulating art rock piece, and whether on the Abbey Road-like "Grace" or the beautifully atmospheric "In Circles," Watson's wispy falsetto blends with mournful guitar like a sibling act with a chip on its shoulders. In the end, Love Songs for Robots is well represented by its title: weird, heartfelt, haunting, stimulating, and unexpectedly sultry; it holds much for humans to appreciate, too. ~ Marcy Donelson
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 5, 2019 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 10, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 20, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2015 | Domino Recording Co

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Pop/Rock - Released November 5, 2012 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 24, 2015 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 23, 2015 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 23, 2015 | Domino Recording Co

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Patrick Watson in the magazine