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Classical - Released October 15, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
The program for this release by French soprano Patricia Petibon is insanely ambitious, but she pulls it off brilliantly. The "nouveau monde" of the title refers not only to the Americas but to other overseas (from Europe) lands and even, Petibon says in the interview-style booklet, to the new world '"revealed to me by [early music pioneers] William Christie, Jordi Savall, and Nikolaus Harnoncourt when they revolutionized the approach to style and sound." But, Petibon goes on, this new world "is one that always has to be expanded with new explorations and new conquests." Thus we get pieces from a previously untouched Peruvian manuscript of the late 18th century along with a Spanish-language aria by Handel, popular songs from the Old and New Worlds, excerpts from Charpentier's Medée (with its crossing of the river Styx, yet another "new world" opera), Rameau's Les Indes galantes (a work desperately in need of a full-scale revival), Purcell's "When I Am Laid in Earth" from Dido and Aeneas (an "Egyptian" work), and more. Petibon weaves the various themes -- pastoral, nostalgic, self-destructive -- together in such a way that this extremely disparate material seems to flow together, and indeed she makes the point convincingly that audiences of the Baroque and Classical eras might have known a good deal of this music and considered it fit for inclusion on the same bill. Her voice may be a bit on the dry side for some, but the same is true of many Christie products, and she has given the Baroque repertory a very strong shake-up here. The La Cetra ensemble of Basel is an adept co-conspirator in Petibon's plans, and even Deutsche Grammophon's graphics, not a field in which the label typically excels, are delightful. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 29, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
The French soprano Patricia Petibon is known for recordings with ambitious, original programs, spaced several years apart. This is one of her most ambitious, and one of her best, even if some might find it a bit outrageous. Petibon approaches the French art song of the late 19th and 20th centuries from the perspective of popular song, suggesting that the boundary is blurry (noncontroversial in itself), and adding a few songs by Léo Ferré, the vastly underrated older contemporary of Jacques Brel. Where things start to get wild is not with the inclusion of popular songs, or even with the heavy emphasis on the music hall rhythms of songs going back as far as Gabriel Fauré. Rather, it's the forces and their shaping that startle: Petibon adds strings, accordion, and percussion to the music at will, connects songs with interludes improvised by the performers based on piano pieces by Erik Satie, several of whose works also appear in full, and generally plays fast and loose with the musical text, all while circling through a variety of moods at the same time as she moves forward through time. If you're looking at the track list and thinking that what you're getting is a set of French songs interpreted in the conventional way by a young soprano, you might want to steer clear. But if you're open to it, this album is both revelatory and hugely entertaining, and it's a fair bet that Satie and Poulenc, at least, would have loved it. © James Manheim /TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Classical - Released February 14, 2020 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
Her constant simpering and extravagance could irritate or even dominate some of listeners. What’s for certain is Patricia Petibon will not leave anyone indifferent, and this album won’t be the one to stop the divisive opinions. Dedicated to the themes of love, death and the sea, this record takes us to twenty-two different ports of call by means of different poets and musicians who have covered one or all of the three. It’s composer/naval officer Jean Cras that leads us along the journey in the long run, where styles and time periods intersect and complement each other. Fauré stands shoulder-to-shoulder with John Lennon, Poulenc with Yann Tiersen. This welcome eclecticism contains a few real gems, like Le chant des lendemains, a melody composed by Thierry Escaich on a poem by Olivier Py who sings in a duet with Patricia Petibon. On the piano, Susan Manoff is the smiling accompanist of this quirky singer who likes to shatter any expectations of what a musical recital should be. Alongside her, David Venitucci on the accordion, Ronan Lebars on the Uilleann pipes and Philippe Marchand aka Yula S. on percussion bring colour to the ensemble, without forgetting Petibon’s guttural cries and the marine sound effects of cormorants and waves. More real than nature. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 4, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Francis Poulenc was the best-known composer of the iconoclastic group Les Six, and his reputation for blending sophistication and flippant humor in his songs and concert music made him something of an enfant terrible. Yet the deaths of several close friends and a visit to the Black Madonna of Rocamadour in 1936 brought about soul-searching and a fresh commitment to the Catholicism of his youth. His rekindled devotion is reflected in several sacred works, such as the Litanies à la Vierge noire (1936), inspired by his visit to Rocamadour; the Stabat Mater (1950), composed in memory of the artist Christian Bérard; and the Gloria (1961). The style of Poulenc's religious music tends toward neo-classicism in the vein of Stravinsky, mixed with a kind of Gothic mysticism, yet it is punctuated by moments of joyous excitement and eclectic touches. French soprano Patricia Petibon performs with Paavo Järvi and the Choir and Orchestra of Paris in this 2013 Deutsche Grammophon release, and the album is a wonderful presentation of Poulenc's religious music that will appeal to listeners of all walks. The profundity of these works and their reverent treatment will attract the devout, while Petibon's exquisite voice and the colorful playing by the orchestra will appeal to a more secular audience. Deutsche Grammophon's reproduction is transparent and full of warmth and presence. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 27, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

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Classical - Released October 24, 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Patricia Petibon's album Melancolía: Spanish Arias and Songs is a result of the soprano's lifelong fascination with the music and culture of Spain, with a special interest in the ways Spanish and French influences have cross-pollinated. She has put together an exceptionally attractive selection of songs and arias from zarzuelas, most of them likely to be unfamiliar to general audiences. Petibon is known for her light, silvery coloratura, and her gift for inhabiting her roles, both dramatic and comic, with great spirit and penetrating insight. This repertoire doesn't especially exploit her coloratura abilities, but it gives free range to her expressive talents, from the feral intensity of the traditional Yoruba chant Ogundé uareré and the unrestrained yawps of Giménez's aria "La tarantula é un bicho múmalo" to the suave lyricism of the familiar Aria from Villa-Lobos' Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5. Even at interpretive extremes, Petibon maintains her characteristic tonal purity and clarity; the final note of the Villa-Lobos rings like a bell. The album concludes with a work newly written for Petibon by French composer Nicolas Bacri, a four-song cycle, Melodías de la melancolía. It's a terrific piece that at its best recalls Peter Lieberson's Neruda Songs, which is very high praise. Fans of Spanish music and anyone who loves Petibon's distinctive performances are likely to be delighted with this album. Josep Pons leads Orquesta Nacional de España in idiomatic, energetic accompaniment. © TiVo

Classical - Released October 10, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Classical - Released October 15, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

The program for this release by French soprano Patricia Petibon is insanely ambitious, but she pulls it off brilliantly. The "nouveau monde" of the title refers not only to the Americas but to other overseas (from Europe) lands and even, Petibon says in the interview-style booklet, to the new world '"revealed to me by [early music pioneers] William Christie, Jordi Savall, and Nikolaus Harnoncourt when they revolutionized the approach to style and sound." But, Petibon goes on, this new world "is one that always has to be expanded with new explorations and new conquests." Thus we get pieces from a previously untouched Peruvian manuscript of the late 18th century along with a Spanish-language aria by Handel, popular songs from the Old and New Worlds, excerpts from Charpentier's Medée (with its crossing of the river Styx, yet another "new world" opera), Rameau's Les Indes galantes (a work desperately in need of a full-scale revival), Purcell's "When I Am Laid in Earth" from Dido and Aeneas (an "Egyptian" work), and more. Petibon weaves the various themes -- pastoral, nostalgic, self-destructive -- together in such a way that this extremely disparate material seems to flow together, and indeed she makes the point convincingly that audiences of the Baroque and Classical eras might have known a good deal of this music and considered it fit for inclusion on the same bill. Her voice may be a bit on the dry side for some, but the same is true of many Christie products, and she has given the Baroque repertory a very strong shake-up here. The La Cetra ensemble of Basel is an adept co-conspirator in Petibon's plans, and even Deutsche Grammophon's graphics, not a field in which the label typically excels, are delightful. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 6, 2003 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released November 1, 2001 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Rosso, soprano Patricia Petitbon's collection of Italian Baroque opera arias, may well be one of the most fun Baroque vocal recitals a listener is likely to encounter because Petitbon is so obviously having the time of her life. The arias, some familiar and some genuine rarities, from operas and oratorios by Handel, Vivaldi, Alessandro Scarlatti, Stradella, Porpora, and Sartorio, express a broad range of emotion, including overwhelming grief, delight and wonder, seductive innuendo, and explosive rage. Petitbon, a spectacular singing actress, throws herself into them with such unselfconscious abandon and such interpretive insight that the listener, even without looking at the texts, is left with no doubt about the specific, sometimes evolving, emotional states of the characters. Purists may take offense at the extremity of her interpretations, which use sighs, whoops, shouts, and whispers to convey the extremity of the characters' emotional states, but their expressive honesty and directness are inarguable. Petitbon's luminous, prismatically lustrous voice and her flawless technique and agile virtuosity should dispel suspicions that she resorts to dramatic extremes to cover any vocal deficit. Every track is a marvel of interpretive depth and vocalism of the highest order, but Alcina's lament "Ah! Mio cor!" is especially dazzling; to heighten the intensity of Alcina's despair, Petitbon transposes some passages up an octave into the stratosphere and others down an octave into solidly baritonal range, to stunning effect. In Cleopatra's "Quando voglio," from Sartorio's Giulio Cesare in Egitto, Petitbon weaves a spell of irresistible, playful sensuality. Scarlatti's "Caldo sangue" from Ismaele puts the limpid purity of her voice; her seamless, velvety phrasing; and the sensitivity of her dramatic instincts on full display. Andrea Marcon leads the Venice Baroque Orchestra in exceptionally thoughtful and inventive realizations of the scores. Deutsche Grammophon's clean, present, well-balanced sound provides an ideal environment for the pristine clarity of the performances. Petitbon's recital sets a high standard for Baroque performance and should appeal to fans of music of the period and of remarkable singing. © TiVo
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Opera Extracts - Released October 27, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Booklet
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Classical - Released September 29, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
The French soprano Patricia Petibon is known for recordings with ambitious, original programs, spaced several years apart. This is one of her most ambitious, and one of her best, even if some might find it a bit outrageous. Petibon approaches the French art song of the late 19th and 20th centuries from the perspective of popular song, suggesting that the boundary is blurry (noncontroversial in itself), and adding a few songs by Léo Ferré, the vastly underrated older contemporary of Jacques Brel. Where things start to get wild is not with the inclusion of popular songs, or even with the heavy emphasis on the music hall rhythms of songs going back as far as Gabriel Fauré. Rather, it's the forces and their shaping that startle: Petibon adds strings, accordion, and percussion to the music at will, connects songs with interludes improvised by the performers based on piano pieces by Erik Satie, several of whose works also appear in full, and generally plays fast and loose with the musical text, all while circling through a variety of moods at the same time as she moves forward through time. If you're looking at the track list and thinking that what you're getting is a set of French songs interpreted in the conventional way by a young soprano, you might want to steer clear. But if you're open to it, this album is both revelatory and hugely entertaining, and it's a fair bet that Satie and Poulenc, at least, would have loved it. © James Manheim /TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released June 1, 2009 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released October 15, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
The program for this release by French soprano Patricia Petibon is insanely ambitious, but she pulls it off brilliantly. The "nouveau monde" of the title refers not only to the Americas but to other overseas (from Europe) lands and even, Petibon says in the interview-style booklet, to the new world '"revealed to me by [early music pioneers] William Christie, Jordi Savall, and Nikolaus Harnoncourt when they revolutionized the approach to style and sound." But, Petibon goes on, this new world "is one that always has to be expanded with new explorations and new conquests." Thus we get pieces from a previously untouched Peruvian manuscript of the late 18th century along with a Spanish-language aria by Handel, popular songs from the Old and New Worlds, excerpts from Charpentier's Medée (with its crossing of the river Styx, yet another "new world" opera), Rameau's Les Indes galantes (a work desperately in need of a full-scale revival), Purcell's "When I Am Laid in Earth" from Dido and Aeneas (an "Egyptian" work), and more. Petibon weaves the various themes -- pastoral, nostalgic, self-destructive -- together in such a way that this extremely disparate material seems to flow together, and indeed she makes the point convincingly that audiences of the Baroque and Classical eras might have known a good deal of this music and considered it fit for inclusion on the same bill. Her voice may be a bit on the dry side for some, but the same is true of many Christie products, and she has given the Baroque repertory a very strong shake-up here. The La Cetra ensemble of Basel is an adept co-conspirator in Petibon's plans, and even Deutsche Grammophon's graphics, not a field in which the label typically excels, are delightful. © TiVo