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Classical - Released October 22, 2012 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Record of the Year - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released October 14, 2013 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released September 12, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Chamber Music - Released February 15, 2018 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
The least that one could say about the art of Moldavian violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja is that one cannot be left indifferent by it - so completely does she set herself apart from her "smoother", more mainstream peers. One only needs to hear her explosive reading of Ravel's Tzigane, where she is particularly daring: the result is extravagant, but in reality, it is wholly in keeping with the spirit of this score, which too many violinists play prissily: after listening to this, you'll not want to hear it played any other way. Kopatchinskaja murmurs, rages, dreams, swoons, surges, explodes, caresses, grips, undulates, chirrups and slaps through the ten minutes of this humorous, provocative, bravura performance. Doubtless the serious Bartók wouldn't have relished Ravel's pseudo-Hungarian allusions - not understanding that the French composer was simply lampooning the Viennese pseudo-Hungarian-Tzigane style - going by his Second Sonata for Violin and Piano, which is both dogmatically Magyar and Bartókian, a rather gruff piece all in all. Much less gruff is the sumptuous Sonata by Poulenc, written in 1943 in a tone which is sometimes tragic - even if the facetious Poulenc undertakes his own personal Resistance by working into each of his three movements a quotation from Tea for Two, a song forbidden under the Occupation. Pianist Polia Leschenko offers the violinist a breather with the short but efficient waltz  Coppelia by Dohnanyi, a little Franco-Hungarian wink, a prelude to the big wink Tzigane, which crowns the album. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 14, 2016 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Concertos - Released September 7, 2009 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Chamber Music - Released September 15, 2008 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions 9 de Classica-Répertoire
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Classical - Released September 20, 2010 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Moldovan violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaya has recorded both traditional repertoire and music by contemporary Turkish composer Fazil Say, and on this album she turns to folk traditions of Eastern Europe and music based on those traditions. In addition to the folk music of Hungary, Romania, and the Ukraine, she plays works by Romanians George Enescu and Grigoras Dinicu, Transylvanian György Ligeti, Hungarian György Kurtág, Maurice Ravel, and Cuban-Chinese composer Jorge Sanchez-Chiong, who was a classmate of Kopatchinskaya's in Vienna. The roots of this music are close to Kopatchinskaya's heart and the album is clearly a labor of love. Her father, Viktor Kopatchinsky, who was the premiere cimbalom player in the Soviet Union and is a dazzling virtuoso in his own right, joins her, as does her mother, violinist and violist Emilia Kopatchinskaya, and pianist Mihuela Ursuleasa and bassist Martin Gjakonovski. All the performers play with brilliant and uninhibited flair, and not surprisingly they have the most freedom to cut loose in the folk music, which comes off with ferocious primal energy. In Dinicu's Hora staccato in the arrangement by Heifetz, once a staple of violinists' encore repertoire, the cimbalom takes the piano part. Ravel made a version of his Tzigane for a piano modified to sound like a cimbalom, so it was a natural step to arrange the part for an actual cimbalom, and it's entirely effective, allowing the familiar piece to be heard in a new light. The most avant-garde piece, and one of the most entertaining, is Sanchez-Chiong's Crin, which requires as much virtuoso vocalization as fiddling. The appealing performances and repertoire make this an album that should be of interest to anyone who loves Eastern European folk music and spirited music-making. Naïve's sound is clear, present, and vibrant.
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Classical - Released October 16, 2015 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released July 6, 2018 | New Focus Recordings

Booklet
While the Violin Concerto from 2016 by Michael Hersch (born 1971) seems like a frightful chaos, the work soon takes a more linear and legible turn, even though its content remains tremendously violent from end to end, even in those less frenetic passages where the melodic line seems to warn of impending danger... The work was commissioned by violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja, who is an ardent supporter of music less ordinary, which requires nerve and endurance. As for end stages (all lower case in the title) from 2017, it explores the "end stages" of musical discourse, an apparent allusion by the composer to the illness and deaths of loved ones which have dogged him for years. The eight movements, far from fading away, give the impression of slowly closing in on themselves. The famous Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, to which the work is dedicated, performs it here. As it is wonted to do, the ensemble plays without a conductor, which is a terrific tour de force, given a score of such complexity. But as each musician is forced to listen to the other, the concentration is extreme – and it shows. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 21, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

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Classical - Released February 5, 2016 | Paladino Music

Booklet