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Jazz - Released February 3, 2014 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released June 8, 2012 | Nonesuch

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Le top 6 JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released March 1, 1976 | ECM

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released May 6, 2016 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released April 1, 1984 | ECM

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
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Jazz - Released May 20, 2013 | Nonesuch

Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released February 21, 2020 | Nonesuch

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According to Pat Metheny, From This Place is not just another album to add to his already super-size discography. “I have been waiting my whole life to make this record,” the guitarist from Missouri says outright. “It’s a kind of musical culmination, reflecting a wide range of expressions that have interested me over the years, scaled across a large canvas, presented in a way that offers the kind of opportunities for communication that can only be earned with a group of musicians who have spent hundreds of nights together on the bandstand.” With his longtime collaborator, drummer Antonio Sanchez along with bassist Linda May Han Oh, pianist Gwilym Simcock and the Hollywood Studio Symphony conducted by Joel McNeely, Metheny begins his ambitious project with a composition of over thirteen minutes, America Undefined, centred around a beautiful arrangement by Gil Goldstein. The lyricism of the theme, the theatrical arches and the inspired but never over zealous interjections from the guitar come together to form this majestic landscape. Pat Metheny manages to avoid falling into the classic traps of symphonic jazz, instead proving to be quite the master of creating an amazing melodic line. This is not surprising, as already with the release of As Falls Wichita, So Falls Wichita Falls with ECM in 1981, an album he made with keyboard player Lyle Mays (who passed away 15 days before the release of From This Place), he excelled in perfectly calibrated lyrical narration. This level of craftsmanship returns on Same River, a prime example of the kind of composition that could easily fall into the banal or the tear-jerking but manages to remain purely beautiful. With Meshell Ndegeocello on vocals, Grégoire Maret on the harmonica and Luis Conte on percussion for certain tracks, the American guitarist has carefully chosen his guests, whose contributions only serve to confirm the precision of Metheny’s vision, a concept much more easily understood after listening to the album in full. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Bebop - Released June 14, 2011 | Nonesuch

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The jazz tradition has long taken pop songs, reimagined and reinvented them harmonically and rhythmically and re-presented them as vehicles for improvisation. Pat Metheny has done something different on What's It All About, his second Nashville-tuned baritone acoustic guitar record (with a handful of other acoustic instruments and no overdubs, but there are edits). Here he performs ten pop songs that have long been part of his personal arcana and recorded them so that we might hear what's inside these songs -- as songs. Recorded on a single day in February of 2011, Metheny interprets well-known songs by Paul Simon, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Lennon & McCartney, Henry Mancini, the Ventures, Burt Bacharach, Paul Williams, Terry Kirkman, Carly Simon, Thom Bell, and others across the pop spectrum. His approach is deliberate; his interest is in the subtlety of melody; its nuance, and mystery; he finds the places he hears inside the music before these songs even begin, or just after they end, through a unique series of tunings he employs between A-flat and C. "The Sound of Silence" opens the set by suggesting the tones of a Japanese koto in its intro (courtesy of his 42-string Pikasso guitar). When the melody commences, its languorous richness and rhythmic balance are so perfect, we hear it not only as the pop song we remember by Simon & Garfunkel, but as a lyric invention that is almost magical in its possibility. The version of Kirkman's "Cherish" (a big hit by the Association), is equally profound. He finds the space where the human voice inserts itself in the harmonic structure and opens it with his guitar. There is slightly more improvisation in "Alfie," but it's open, spacious, and full of hinted-at dimensions in the crafting of the song's parameters. "Girl from Ipanema," played as a skeletal, impressionistic ballad, uncovers suggestions of darker melodies inside. He pulls out both the implied elegance in "That's the Way I've Always Heard It Should Be," and the quietly majestic variety of it in "Rainy Days and Mondays." "Betcha by Golly, Wow" stands as a revelation: its inventive harmonics and syncopations are inherent in the tune's basic architecture. In closer "And I Love Her" are the direct implications of bossa that Lennon and McCartney had no doubt taken note of at the time. Ultimately, What's It All About is an intimate work revealing Metheny's investigation of composition itself. The notion of song is inherent in everything he does, and he reveals that inspiration in spades here. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released September 1, 1980 | ECM

Pat Metheny's credibility with the jazz community went way up with the release of this package, a superb two-CD collaboration with a quartet of outstanding jazz musicians that dared to be uncompromising at a time when most artists would have merely continued pursuing their electric commercial successes. From the disbanded Keith Jarrett American quartet came bassist Charlie Haden and tenor Dewey Redman -- who alternates with and occasionally plays alongside tenor Michael Brecker -- and Jack DeJohnette provides more combustible drumming than Metheny had ever experienced on record before. Yet Metheny's off-kilter wandering on solo electric guitar is a comfortable fit for the post-bop rhythmic crosscurrents of this music. Indeed, Haden and Metheny are in total sympathy, perhaps celebrating their mutual Missouri roots, and Metheny's difficult "Pretty Scattered" -- which he mockingly described as "Guitar Revenge!" -- nearly manages to stump even Redman and Brecker. The first of the "Two Folk Songs" is a great example of the Metheny folk-jazz fusion, with furious strummed guitar underpinning Brecker's melodic line and excursions on the outside and DeJohnette's spectacular drums. Another remarkable track is "Open," a group improvisation that finds DeJohnette shaping the track's direction with a pushing solo and Metheny and the saxes emerging at the end. The two original LPs were organized so that the more distinctive Metheny fusions were on sides one and four and the overt jazz tracks occupied sides two and three. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Bebop - Released April 24, 2009 | Nonesuch

Pat Metheny by himself with an acoustic guitar -- for longtime fans it might not get any better. Always interested in blending jazz with folk and pop, the guitarist does just that, focusing heavily on the folk end of things on One Quiet Night. Featuring a nice afterglow interpretation of Norah Jones' hit "Don't Know Why" and an unexpected reinterpretation of "Ferry Cross the Mersey" which turns the Gerry & the Pacemakers classic into a poignant lament, the album also showcases Metheny as a melodic pop composer. "Song for the Boys" sounds surprisingly like an instrumental take on early-'80s British pop à la the Smiths, while "Last Train Home" brilliantly mixes Metheny's knack for taking simple chord progressions and beautifully tweaking them with odd harmonies. Perhaps a bit light for some straight-ahead jazz fans, listeners interested in thoughtful, folky, jazz-inflected ballads will find this rapturous. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released September 23, 2007 | Nonesuch

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Jazz - Released September 12, 2006 | Nonesuch

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Bebop - Released October 3, 2008 | Nonesuch

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Jazz - Released February 6, 2006 | Nonesuch

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Jazz - Released April 27, 1981 | ECM

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Jazz - Released February 6, 2006 | Nonesuch

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Jazz - Released November 5, 1999 | Warner Jazz

The soundtrack to the Sigourney Weaver/Julianne Moore film A Map Of The World features an acoustic guitar-based score written and performed by Pat Metheny. Along with his complete score for the film, the album also includes 25 minutes of expanded versions of the movie's music. The title track, "Fall From Grace," "Outcasts" and "Homecoming" reflect the film's bittersweet tone. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Bebop - Released June 2, 2009 | Nonesuch

This 2009 deluxe package brings together LP and CD versions of the Pat Metheny Trio's well-received 2008 DAY TRIP along with its live-in-Japan prequel EP, TOKYO DAY TRIP. Accompanied by Christian McBride on bass and Antonio Sanchez on drums, DAY TRIP was recorded in just one day in 2005 and is widely regarded as one of Metheny's finest recordings. There are no unusual fusion experiments here and no superstar turns, just an utterly fluent contemporary guitar trio playing in a thoroughly modern idiom. A enduring highlight is the plaintive acoustic ballad, "Is This America?," written in 2005 in response to Hurricane Katrina. As for the Tokyo date, it was actually recorded before the studio session but released at the same time as DAY TRIP in early 2008. Ironically, the live recording sounds larger and more produced than its studio cousin. Likewise, there is no repetition of material; these Tokyo compositions are painted in broader strokes and have a certain rock feeling to them, reminiscent of up-and-coming avant-guitarist Mary Halvorson's striking DRAGON"S HEAD. The availability in one place of both these live and studio dates, and in their respective formats, is a real treasure trove for contemporary jazz and Pat Metheny fans alike.
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Jazz - Released March 5, 2007 | Nonesuch

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Jazz - Released May 1, 1977 | ECM