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Electronic - Released February 8, 2010 | Rough Trade

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Music
Since his second full-length as Pantha du Prince, 2007's truly sublime, duly acclaimed This Bliss, Henrik Weber has gradually expanded his profile beyond the traditional confines of the minimal electronic realm, turning in remixes for the likes of Animal Collective, Bloc Party, and the Long Blondes and, in 2009, making the surprising shift from Hamburg's Dial Records to venerable indie rock label Rough Trade, hardly an imprint known for its electronica output. Black Noise, his first album for Rough Trade, bolsters those indie credentials further with a couple of guest spots: !!!'s Tyler Pope plays bass on one cut, and Noah Lennox (Panda Bear, Animal Collective) sings on another. "Why stick to the things that I've already tried?," Lennox muses in his drippy, hazily harmonized fashion on the typically lovely "Stick to My Side" -- and indeed, why shouldn't we expect Weber to branch out a bit? As it happens, though, Lenox's vocals are about the extent of the overt musical innovation on offer here. (For what its worth, Pope's bass on "The Splendour" fails to leave any impression, although the track manages to acquit itself of its rather aggrandizing title quite nicely.) Partisans of the Pantha of old needn't be too concerned (and, by the same token, those intrigued by the possibilities of a more indie-infused Pantha record may be disappointed) because Black Noise does overwhelmingly stick to the tried and true. Which is hardly a cause for complaint. Weber is truly a master of mood and texture, one of few techno/minimal/microhouse producers working with an unmistakable signature sound, and all of his hallmarks are present and accounted for: the shimmering chimes and bells, muffled clicks, woozily atmospheric synth, and deep, dubby bass, set against sturdy but subdued pulsing house grooves, all of which make his music, almost uncannily, equally well-suited to dancefloors and dreamscapes. He has a few slight sonic twists up his sleeve -- "Abglanz" introduces a figure played on what sounds like a steel drum, and "Behind the Stars" brings on the grinding electro keyboards and dark, distorted vocals, recalling the "micro-goth" tag sometimes applied to his earlier work, while the brief, beatless "Im Bann" is all languid guitar strums, thick hypnotic haze, and a muffled crunching sound like footsteps in the snow -- but nothing here would have sounded out of place on This Bliss, and a few tracks, like "Bohemian Forest," whose melodic twinklings feel a bit like Pantha-by-numbers here, could well have been standouts on that record. With its generally well-conceived but vaguely non-committal-feeling gestures toward expanding Pantha du Prince's musical range, Black Noise can't help but feel ever so slightly like a letdown after the consistently mesmerizing rapture of its predecessor. But make no mistake: Weber is still making some of the most enchanting electronica out there, and if this album brings him the increased exposure for which he seems well-poised, there are few producers more deserving. © K. Ross Hoffman /TiVo
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Electronic - Released March 8, 2010 | Rough Trade

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Electronic - Released March 6, 2020 | Modern Recordings

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What sound do trees make when they speak to each other? This is the question that guided the latest project by German musician Hendrik Weber, aka Pantha du Prince. The idea was formed after long walks in thick forests during his childhood, an idea he brought to stage in Hamburg in summer 2019 with The Conference of Trees. This profoundly ecological project has now been transcribed into an album. Accompanied by dressed-up percussionists and a host of wooden instruments for which Weber put his skills as a carpenter to good use, he submits the electronic process to the service of these organic sounds (wood, but also stone and metal – we should also point out that no trees were harmed in the making of this album) to submerge the spectator/listener in a dreamlike odyssey, somewhere between Nova Materia and Alva Noto. “I wanted to become a tree myself and enable a group of musicians to become trees as well.” So, over to us now. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic - Released March 6, 2020 | Modern Recordings

What sound do trees make when they speak to each other? This is the question that guided the latest project by German musician Hendrik Weber, aka Pantha du Prince. The idea was formed after long walks in thick forests during his childhood, an idea he brought to stage in Hamburg in summer 2019 with The Conference of Trees. This profoundly ecological project has now been transcribed into an album. Accompanied by dressed-up percussionists and a host of wooden instruments for which Weber put his skills as a carpenter to good use, he submits the electronic process to the service of these organic sounds (wood, but also stone and metal – we should also point out that no trees were harmed in the making of this album) to submerge the spectator/listener in a dreamlike odyssey, somewhere between Nova Materia and Alva Noto. “I wanted to become a tree myself and enable a group of musicians to become trees as well.” So, over to us now. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic - Released June 9, 2017 | Rough Trade

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Electronic - Released May 20, 2016 | Rough Trade

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Electronic - Released January 14, 2013 | Rough Trade

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Electronic - Released April 18, 2011 | Rough Trade

A year on from the release of Black Noise, one of 2010's most masterful and celebrated electronic releases, Hamburg techno maven Hendrik Weber issued this straightforwardly titled revisitation, boasting an enviable roster of A-list remixers that reflects his unique position straddling both the mainstream of European minimal electronica (Basic Channel pioneer Moritz von Oswald; Weber's erstwhile Dial labelmates Efdemin, Lawrence, and Carsten Jost) and the wider well of broadly indie-friendly acts (Four Tet, Animal Collective). Fully eight of these "versions" are based on a mere two of Black Noise's 11 cuts, with "Stick to My Side" alone accounting for five. Still, even though these are largely respectful reworkings, altering musical content but rarely the underlying emotional tone -- nobody effects a transformation nearly as striking, for instance, as the shift from the picturesque painted landscape on the original album cover to the stark, elegant, abstraction adorning XI Versions -- the resulting collection manages to be just as pleasantly varied and cohesively listenable as Black Noise, while distinct enough to be worth investigating on its own right. The three renderings of "Welt Am Draht" -- not necessarily a highlight of the original album, but nevertheless a lovely specimen of Pantha's fluidly floating yet rigorously rhythmic style -- are an illustrative example. Von Oswald turns in a typically entrancing, atmospheric dub, stripping the track down and refitting it with an airier, gently syncopated pulse and reams of open space. Animal Collective preserve Pantha's ever-twinkling bells and chimes but sub in more basic "tribal" drumming for the rhythm and add a wash of their familiarly fractured, woozy vocals. And Hamburg-based duo Die Vögel, in the most remarkable mutation here, offer up a pulsating, densely layered live-brass-and-flutes opus recalling the oompah-flavored experiments of Nôze or Ricardo Villalobos, which shares only its basic rhythmic undercarriage with Weber's original (and only after a full two minutes of stuttered, harmonically rich brass chorale). None of these three tracks sounds anything alike, but they work remarkably well together since each in its own way picks up on Pantha's predominant aesthetic cues, by and large remaining elegantly smooth and subdued, yet subtly, sinuously propulsive. The same goes for the five "Stick" remixes, although they tend to be less adventurous and, save for the endlessly spiraling synths and cheerful thump of Four Tet's version and Walls' beatless, lushly reverberant take, can feel somewhat formalist and occasionally overly static. Hieroglyphic Being's unrecognizable, incongruously mechanical mix of "Satellite Sniper" is the only real misstep (albeit a minor one), and all told this is one of the most rewarding remix albums in recent memory. © K. Ross Hoffman /TiVo
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Ambient - Released September 22, 2017 | Neue Meister

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Electronic - Released June 9, 2017 | Rough Trade

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Electronic - Released July 10, 2020 | Modern Recordings

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Electronic - Released October 11, 2010 | Rough Trade

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Electronic - Released December 14, 2009 | Rough Trade

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Electronic - Released April 17, 2020 | Modern Recordings

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Electronic - Released February 19, 2016 | Rough Trade

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Electronic - Released April 17, 2020 | Modern Recordings

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Electronic - Released July 10, 2020 | Modern Recordings

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Dance - Released December 1, 2017 | Stereo Deluxe