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Rock - Released February 23, 2018 | Coalition Music (Records)

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Rock - Released February 23, 2018 | Coalition Music (Records)

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Pop/Rock - Released July 1, 2003 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Released April 15, 1997 | Columbia

Two years after their impressive debut, Our Lady Peace continue their rock journey with Clumsy. This time around, the melodies are more comfortable and the roaring rock riffs are calmer, resulting in a sound that earned Our Lady Peace the highest sales of their career. Raine Maida's lyrical screeching remains intact, sounding quite inviting on songs such as "Big Dumb Rocket" and "Automatic Flowers." The intensity found on the first album is a bit more tame, but Clumsy still beats the sophomore slump, and leadoff single "Superman's Dead" shows Our Lady Peace creating a unique type of post-grunge music. The album does introduce a more mature Our Lady Peace, and Maida's songwriting is far more internal, a reflection of personal imperfections and consequences that help fuel standout ballads like "4 A.M." But what makes Our Lady Peace a powerful act is their desire to keep it real on their own turf. Many may criticize Clumsy as less desirable, but it's their own deal. And that's how rock & roll should be, anyway. ~ MacKenzie Wilson
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Pop/Rock - Released July 20, 2009 | Columbia

Obviously striving for a deeper meaning rather than the overly passionate composition found on their last album, Our Lady Peace goes for the concept record. Spiritual Machines is a bold move, considering it's the band's fourth album into their mounting career. Still, Raine Maida is confident. Spiritual Machines is exactly what he hoped it would be -- intelligence with a cause. The title of the record breathes such power of thought, for Spiritual Machines comes from Ray Kurzweil's The Age of Spiritual Machines: When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence. Maida's heavy lyrical depictions play directly into such social conventionalism. It's also deeply personal in the sense that the band attempts to reach for individual spirituality with the hopes of that listeners do the same. Stereotypes and clichés can lead this world into something less desirable, therefore Our Lady Peace projects that inner spirituality can replenish anything lost inside one's self. Call it a deep move beyond their previous efforts, but the gnarling grunge-oriented guitars that have kept Our Lady Peace a silent success (outside of Canada) since 1995's Naveed is a chief force. "Are You Sad" and "Right Behind You (Mafia)" are both therapeutic anthems attacking personal stress and struggle, but recognizing a support system as well. The band experienced inner turmoil when drummer Jeremy Taggart was severely injured after a mugging during the recording sessions. Left without a drummer for these two songs, fellow mate and Pearl Jam drummer Matt Cameron stepped in. Maida's lazy nasal-like vocals carry "In Repair" with sheer essence -- there are no thunderous riffs plaguing the song's initial plea for a little soul-searching. The first single, "Life," and "Middle of Yesterday" also inspire one to look beyond the trials and tribulations of every day routine, for there is indeed something better lurking behind. It seems as if the members of Our Lady Peace have found a common peace. They can still deliver pinch-hitting licks and the brash attitude they did when they first formed in 1993, but they are a little older and a little wiser. The notions behind Kurzweil's book and Our Lady Peace's Spiritual Machines illustrate that such things can be a working force instead of placated psychological jargon interpreted by followers. ~ MacKenzie Wilson
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Pop/Rock - Released December 13, 2005 | Columbia

In the liners for Healthy in Paranoid Times, Our Lady Peace's first studio album in three years, there's a photo of a wall where facts are scrawled. "Within these 1165 days..." it says, referring to the lengthy time it took to record the album, "11 thousand dollars was spent on food for the band." "2000 hours were spent both discussing and playing music." But then the tone changes. "30 active wars were fought across the globe," "54 million people died from extreme poverty." The list goes on, itemizing everything from how many hours OLP spent on airplanes to the number of North American deaths from cancer. Are we supposed to see the futility of rock & roll in the face of international strife and hunger? That's certainly an honorable notion, but it seems sort of ham-fisted, too, mostly because no one made Our Lady Peace take that long to record their album. But it also has very little to do with the music on Healthy in Paranoid Times. Well, in "Wipe That Smile Off Your Face," Raine Maida does use metaphors of wars and bombs to describe a failing relationship, so maybe he's aiming for some connectivity between the music and those suffering phrases on the wall. Healthy is also a much moodier album than 2002's Gravity. The highlights of that record were the Goo Goo Dolls-ish singles "Somewhere Out There" and "Innocent." Here songs have a tendency to drag on -- opener "Angels/Losing/Sleep" plods along for nearly five minutes, and even the single "Where Are You" -- which otherwise has a peppy guitar line comparable to the Killers -- overstays its welcome with an extended "This could be the best day of your life" singalong. But the biggest problem with Healthy in Paranoid Times, besides its inflated thematic framework, is its lack of distinction. Our Lady Peace has proven how good they are at approximating U2's epic scope with modern rock atmospherics. So why did it take them over a 1000 days to do that again? ~ Johnny Loftus
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Pop/Rock - Released June 6, 2002 | Epic

The fact that every song on Gravity ends exactly the same way -- Our Lady Peace repeats the chorus at roaring volume, then hits a final chord, like a truck hits a wall, and lets it ring down to silence -- hints at the predictability of this album. The lyrics rage at the spiritual bankruptcy of suburban oldsters ("All for You"), express tender regret over love lost ("your purple hair" is among the items missed in "Somewhere Out There," a kind of apocalyptic variation on "These Foolish Things"), and otherwise zoom in on the blemished face of modern life. It's apparent that Raine Maida has a message, and the pipes to deliver it with angst and fury in appropriate proportion. All that's missing is a willingness to challenge musical convention as boldly as he takes on his demons and those of his audience. (He might have begun by finding something other than the "we are" riff, which sits a little too close to P.O.D.'s "Youth of the Nation," for "Innocent.") ~ Robert L. Doerschuk
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Rock - Released March 22, 2014 | Epic

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Rock - Released April 3, 2012 | Warner Music Canada

The eighth studio album from Our Lady Peace finds the Canadian-born Los Angeles-based alt-rockers pushing the boundaries, offering up a nine-song set that lead singer Raine Maida describes as "more experimental and ambitious" than any of their previous outings. The resulting Curve more or less lives up to its ballpark idiom, and while it may not signal a complete reinvention, it definitely distances itself from the calculated guitar-driven alt-rock that dominated 2009's Burn Burn. Stand-out cuts like the hooky, instantly gratifying "As Fast as You Can" and the moody Radiohead-meets-the National single "Heavyweights," are adventurous and radio ready, allowing room for both the band and Maida, whose distinctive warble remains more than respectable, to strut their stuff, but too much of the album is plagued by overly earnest pap like "Find Our Way," "If This is It," and "Window Seat," which just sound like rote '90s alt-rock songs with new window treatments. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Pop/Rock - Released October 26, 1995 | Columbia

Canada's Our Lady Peace makes a stunning debut with Naveed, almost avoiding the mid-'90s reign of Seattle's grunge. Mixing fierce melodies among '60s hard rock guitars, Our Lady Peace projects confidence, but is not as angry as Pearl Jam; however, they're abrasive and ready to rage against the corporate social machine. Percussion is tight, and frontman Raine Maida's lyrical poetry is also solid and wailing. Songs like "Supersatellite" and debut single "Starseed" gnarl with Maida's scratchy falsetto, which complements Mike Turner's riveting licks. They're anxious, and that's refreshing for a young band. They're not exactly hoping to define anything, but Our Lady Peace does wish to relish the rock & roll hardballers who came before them. "Hope" and "Denied" are both infectious with Zen-like rhythms similar to the likes of Led Zeppelin, making a definitive stance for the band. Our Lady Peace yearns to achieve a musical position, and Naveed is a decent introduction to the group's own musical spirituality. ~ MacKenzie Wilson
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Pop/Rock - Released September 6, 1999 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Released April 10, 2009 | Columbia - Legacy

The Our Lady Peace entry into Legacy's physical/digital hybrid Playlist series represents the second "best-of" collection from the popular Canadian post-grunge rockers. At 14 tracks, it falls four songs short of 2006's superior Decade (it also lacks two of the group's best cuts, "Thief" and "Where Are You"), but there are enough key songs here like "Starseed," "Superman's Dead," and "Clumsy" to entice casual fans looking to stock their MP3 players. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Pop - Released November 21, 2006 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Released March 3, 2003 | Epic

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Pop/Rock - Released June 18, 2002 | Columbia

The fact that every song on Gravity ends exactly the same way -- Our Lady Peace repeats the chorus at roaring volume, then hits a final chord, like a truck hits a wall, and lets it ring down to silence -- hints at the predictability of this album. The lyrics rage at the spiritual bankruptcy of suburban oldsters ("All for You"), express tender regret over love lost ("your purple hair" is among the items missed in "Somewhere Out There," a kind of apocalyptic variation on "These Foolish Things"), and otherwise zoom in on the blemished face of modern life. It's apparent that Raine Maida has a message, and the pipes to deliver it with angst and fury in appropriate proportion. All that's missing is a willingness to challenge musical convention as boldly as he takes on his demons and those of his audience. (He might have begun by finding something other than the "we are" riff, which sits a little too close to P.O.D.'s "Youth of the Nation," for "Innocent.") ~ Robert L. Doerschuk
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Pop/Rock - Released July 22, 2003 | Columbia

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