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Pop - Released January 1, 1993 | Epic

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1973 | Motown

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
A blaxploitation masterpiece on par with Curtis Mayfield's Superfly and Isaac Hayes' Shaft, Roy Ayers' soundtrack for the 1973 Pam Grier vehicle Coffy remains one of the most intriguing and evocative film scores of its era or any other. Ayers' signature vibes create atmospheres and textures quite distinct from your average blaxploitation effort, embracing both heavy, tripped-out funk ("Brawling Broads") and vividly nuanced soul-jazz ("Aragon"). The vocal numbers are no less impressive, in particular the rapturous opening cut, "Coffy Is the Color." Richly cinematic grooves, as inventive and cohesive as any of Ayers' vintage Ubiquity LPs. Highly recommended. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 9, 1996 | Columbia

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
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Film Soundtracks - Released August 10, 2004 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 9, 1993 | Arista

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Musical Theatre - Released August 23, 1999 | RCA Records Label

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Film Soundtracks - Released February 28, 2006 | Volcano - Legacy

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Pop - Released June 30, 1986 | Columbia

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 2, 2001 | Epic - Legacy

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Pop - Released April 14, 2003 | Volcano

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 19, 1999 | Sony Classical

Director/screenwriter Anthony Minghella is a meticulous craftsman, known for his vigorous attention to every element of a production. In the case of The Talented Mr. Ripley, his 1999 adaptation of a Patricia Highsmith potboiler, he lent particular focus to the film's music. In the novel, the gregarious American expatriate Dickie Greenleaf (played in the movie by Jude Law) was a painter. But Minghella made him a jazz enthusiast instead, contrasting Dickie's tastes with the classical inclinations of the enigmatic title character Tom Ripley (Matt Damon). The result is a film that gains much of its texture from its carefully chosen musical selections. The soundtrack opens with a pair of jazz numbers taken from two of the most fascinating scenes in the movie. In the first, Dickie takes Tom to an Italian jazz club, and both end up on stage exuberantly singing "Tu Vuo' Fa L'Americano." The song, performed on the CD by Damon, Law, Italian singer Fiorello and the Guy Barker International Quartet, establishes Ripley's captivation with his friend's hedonistic lifestyle. The second scene accomplishes the reverse: Dickie is captivated by the depth and sensitivity Ripley expresses in his evocative rendition of the Rodgers and Hart tune "My Funny Valentine." Again, Damon does his own singing on the soundtrack. The rest of the album intersperses several jazz tracks (including performances by Miles Davis, Charlie Parker, and Dizzy Gillespie) with excerpts from Gabriel Yared's Oscar nominated score. Yared's work here lacks the originality and scope of his breakthrough score for The English Patient, but it captures perfectly both the sunlit Italian glamour and the muscle-tensing intrigue that characterize the film. Yared also wrote the music for the quietly disturbing Sinead O'Connor ballad, "Lullaby for Cain," that is played over the opening credits. The song, which features lyrics by Minghella himself, sets an appropriately ominous tone that effectively foreshadows the gruesome direction the film will eventually take. It is a solid contribution to a soundtrack album that is as carefully and thoughtfully constructed as the movie itself. © Evan Cater /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 14, 1995 | Arista

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Film Soundtracks - Released June 2, 1992 | Epic Soundtrax

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 23, 2000 | RCA Records Label

In contrast to the experiences of many Broadway songwriters, the team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II had a large say in how their shows came to the big screen. South Pacific did not arrive in movie theaters until nine years after its Broadway opening, and when it did on March 19, 1958, its two-hour, 70-minute running time allowed for the full Rodgers & Hammerstein score, plus one song, "My Girl Back Home," that had been cut from the stage version for time. In addition to preserving their songs, the songwriters saw to it that the songs were sung by people they approved of, most of whom were not the same people seen on the screen. Mitzi Gaynor sang her own songs in the lead female role of nurse Nellie Forbush, and Ray Walston, who had played the supporting part of rowdy marine Luther Billis in the first national tour and in London, also got to sing. But Rossano Brazzi, as male lead Emile de Becque, was dubbed by opera singer Giorgio Tozzi (who was given screen credit), John Kerr as second male lead Lt. Cable was replaced by Bill Lee, and Juanita Hall, who had originated the role of Bloody Mary on Broadway, was voiced by Muriel Smith, who had played the part in London. (Several minor characters were also dubbed.) While it would have been nice if Lee and Smith were credited in the film and on the soundtrack album, the result is a well-sung version of the score. Gaynor is appropriately frisky in what is really a soubrette's part in songs like "I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair" and "I'm in Love With a Wonderful Guy," Tozzi is sonorous and romantic in "Some Enchanted Evening," Lee is passionate in "Younger Than Springtime," Smith is haunting in "Bali Ha'i" and playful in "Happy Talk," and Walston, leading the Ken Darby Male Chorus, makes the most of "Bloody Mary" and "There Is Nothin' Like a Dame." Only Smith and Walston improve upon their counterparts on the original Broadway cast album, however, with stage leads Mary Martin and Ezio Pinza particularly outdistancing their screen and soundtrack rivals. And now that CD reissues of that earlier recording contain Martin's version of "My Girl Back Home," one can't even argue that the soundtrack album is more complete. The original Broadway cast album is preferred. It also sold better than the soundtrack album, but the soundtrack's commercial performance was not at all shabby. The film was one of 1958's ten biggest moneymakers, but the soundtrack did even better. Its run of more than seven months at number one tied it for fourth place among the longest chart toppers in history behind the original Broadway cast album, the soundtrack to West Side Story, and Michael Jackson's Thriller. It was not only the most successful album of 1958, but the most successful album of the second half of the 1950s. Given that success, the album has been relatively neglected in the CD era. There was a straight-transfer reissue in 1988, but it took RCA until October 24, 2000, to release a refurbished CD version, and that one turned out to be a disappointment. At a time when rivals like Sony and Universal were upgrading their cast and soundtrack reissues in terms of sound, bonus tracks, annotations, and photographs, RCA's new South Pacific seemed skimpy. There were no bonus tracks, little in the way of annotation (the songs were credited by character name except for Ken Darby!), a modest if well-written essay by Joseph F. Laredo, and no new photographs. In fact, the cover was a reproduction of the cover of the original monophonic LP (proclaiming "A 'New Orthophonic' High Fidelity Release"), down to its catalog number, LOC-1032, which was confusing, since the reissue had a new catalog number and was in stereo. Such a jewel of RCA's catalog deserved better treatment. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2000 | Polydor Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2002 | Epic

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Film Soundtracks - Released November 10, 1992 | Columbia

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Film Soundtracks - Released April 14, 2003 | Volcano

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 26, 2010 | RCA Records Label Nashville

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Film Soundtracks - Released June 14, 1993 | Epic Soundtrax