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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Year - Gramophone Record of the Month - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The Gewandhaus Orchestra's history of playing the nine symphonies of Ludwig van Beethoven extends back to 1825, when the composer was still alive, and these masterworks have been a mainstay of their repertoire ever since. After Riccardo Chailly took the helm of the Gewandhaus Orchestra in 2005, the idea of performing the full cycle for Decca under his direction became an imperative, and the recordings were made between 2007 and 2009. Chailly's Beethoven draws on the traditions of performance long honored in Leipzig, so the interpretations of the symphonies have more than a little of historically informed practice about them, while still being connected to the mainstream. Tempos are generally brisk and textures are immaculate, while the strings play with minimal vibrato, and the winds offer distinctive and colorful sonorities. So the ideals of authentic period practice are realized without annoying mannerisms, and the music has all the dynamic flexibility and robust qualities that everyone wants in Beethoven. This deluxe set comes in a sturdy hardcover book, with the five discs held in stiff cardboard sleeves that show photographs from different angles of Max Klinger's massive Beethoven statue; the whole package is housed in a slip cover. Decca's sound quality is crisp and clean, with nearly ideal resonance. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2015 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
Recordings of Brahms' two serenades from the late 1850s are sparse compared with those of the symphonies, perhaps because they're sometimes depicted as preparatory exercises for the mighty four. But they're really not that; they're light works that stand on their own, imbued with the spirit of Classicism, especially that of Haydn, and anyone who loves Brahms knows that his light works are no less profound than his weighty ones. The Serenade No. 1 in D major, Op. 11, is in six movements; the Serenade No. 2 in A major, Op. 16, in five, with each containing both a scherzo and a minuet. That little contrast is key to both the elegance of craft in these works and to the beauty of the readings here by conductor Riccardo Chailly, leading the venerable Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig. Nowhere does Chailly try to push these works toward the Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68, or even the contemporaneous Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Op. 15. Instead he takes them as they are, making them as transparent as possible, letting them breathe and giving them a relaxed, almost joyous quality that does not foreclose the discovery of small details. It may seem surprising to some that musicians as established as Chailly and the Gewandhaus players, who must have performed these works since their teen years, can manage such seemingly spontaneous readings, but there you have it. This is superior early Brahms. © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 7, 2017 | Accentus Music

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

The Gewandhaus Orchestra's history of playing the nine symphonies of Ludwig van Beethoven extends back to 1825, when the composer was still alive, and these masterworks have been a mainstay of its repertoire ever since. After Riccardo Chailly took the helm of the Gewandhaus Orchestra in 2005, the idea of performing the full cycle for Decca under his direction became an imperative, and these recordings of the Symphony No. 7 in A major and the Symphony No. 8 in F major were made in 2008 and 2009, respectively, with the Overture to The Ruins of Athens and the Egmont Overture also recorded in 2009. Chailly's Beethoven draws on the traditions of performance long honored in Leipzig, so the interpretations of the symphonies have more than a little of historically informed practice about them while still being mainstream performances. Tempos are generally brisk, and textures are immaculate, while the strings play with minimal vibrato, and the winds offer distinctive and colorful sonorities. So the ideals of authentic period practice are realized without annoying mannerisms, and the music has the dynamic flexibility and robust qualities that everyone wants in Beethoven. Decca's sound quality is crisp and clean, with nearly ideal resonance. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
For most listeners' purposes, Riccardo Chailly's set of Johannes Brahms' four symphonies will seem standard-issue, with respectable and uncontroversial interpretations from an esteemed conductor, and rich and resonant performances by the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. Even in the choice of filler pieces, the set includes the three orchestral works that are usually packaged with the symphonies: the Tragic Overture, the Haydn Variations, and the Academic Festival Overture. However, this set offers welcome suprises and extra value for the purchase. Two orchestral arrangements of the Interludes, Opp. 116 and 117 for piano, are included, along with instrumental versions of a handful of Liebeslieder Waltzes and three of the orchestrated Hungarian Dances, which may be incentives to listeners who are looking for a little more. Also included are Brahms' original version of the Andante of the First Symphony and the alternate opening of the Fourth. But no one should invest in a set solely on the basis of these extras, however unusual they may be. Since first recording the cycle with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, where he offered a rather heavy-handed modern take on the symphonies, Chailly has gone back to an older, more historically informed style of playing Brahms that was familiar to conductors of the early 20th century. The music is lighter and more transparent, so in some ways, his recordings are sometimes reminiscent of classic performances by Bruno Walter, George Szell, and other revered conductors. For traditionalists, this is a fine set to own, especially if a fresh digital recording is needed. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

The Gewandhaus Orchestra's history of playing the nine symphonies of Ludwig van Beethoven extends back to 1825, when the composer was still alive, and these masterworks have been a mainstay of its repertoire ever since. After Riccardo Chailly took the helm of the Gewandhaus Orchestra in 2005, the idea of performing the full cycle for Decca under his direction became an imperative, and these recordings of the Symphony No. 5 in C minor and the Symphony No. 6 in F major, "Pastorale," were made in 2009, with the Coriolan Overture recorded in 2007. Chailly's Beethoven draws on the traditions of performance long honored in Leipzig, so the interpretations of the symphonies have more than a little of historically informed practice about them, while still being mainstream performances. Tempos are generally brisk, and textures are immaculate, while the strings play with minimal vibrato, and the winds offer distinctive and colorful sonorities. So the ideals of authentic period practice are realized without annoying mannerisms, and the music has the dynamic flexibility and robust qualities that everyone wants in Beethoven. Decca's sound quality is crisp and clean, with nearly ideal resonance. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Just before the era when informed period performance practice was coming into vogue, this 2009 set of Bach's Brandenburg Concertos would have been perfectly standard, aside from two peculiarities. Played on modern instruments by the Gewandhausorchester of Leipzig under the direction of Riccardo Chailly, these performances stick pretty much to standard tempos, with rich, almost lush textures; expressive, nearly sweet phrasing; and robust, even muscular rhythms. The musicians clearly love the music and playing together, and their affectionate interplay has the quality of chamber music, despite the size of the ensemble. The soloists are all first-rate, from the horns in the First Concerto through the violas da gamba in the Sixth Concerto, and violinist Sebastian Breuninger's central cadenza in the Third Concerto is especially lovely. Chailly shows himself to be a deft and deferential Bach conductor. Of the peculiarities, one is likely a mistake, and the other is clearly a decision. The former is a slight lurch leading into the final recapitulation in the opening movement of the Third Concerto. The latter is the determination to perform on modern instruments in this day and age of historically informed performance practice. The former is unfortunate, but forgivable by all but the most inflexibly critical. The latter is debatable, with the modern instruments' warm sensuality being embraced by some, and denounced by others. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

The Gewandhaus Orchestra's history of playing the nine symphonies of Ludwig van Beethoven extends back to 1825, when the composer was still alive, and these masterworks have been a mainstay of its repertoire ever since. After Riccardo Chailly took the helm of the Gewandhaus Orchestra in 2005, the idea of performing the full cycle for Decca under his direction became an imperative, and these recordings of the Symphony No. 1 in C major and the Symphony No. 2 in D major were made in 2007 and 2009, respectively, with the Leonore Overture No. 3 and the Overture to The Creatures of Prometheus also recorded in 2009. Chailly's Beethoven draws on the traditions of performance long honored in Leipzig, so the interpretations of the symphonies have more than a little of historically informed practice about them, while still being mainstream performances. Tempos are generally brisk, and textures are immaculate, while the strings play with minimal vibrato, and the winds offer distinctive and colorful sonorities. So the ideals of authentic period practice are realized without annoying mannerisms, and the music has the dynamic flexibility and robust qualities everyone wants in Beethoven. Decca's sound quality is crisp and clean, with nearly ideal resonance. © TiVo
CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1995 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

CD£11.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

The Gewandhaus Orchestra's history of playing the nine symphonies of Ludwig van Beethoven extends back to 1825, when the composer was still alive, and these masterworks have been a mainstay of its repertoire ever since. After Riccardo Chailly took the helm of the Gewandhaus Orchestra in 2005, the idea of performing the full cycle for Decca under his direction became an imperative, and this recording of the Symphony No. 9 in D minor, "Choral," was made in 2008, while the Name-Day Overture and the King Stephen Overture were recorded in 2009. Chailly's Beethoven draws on the traditions of performance long honored in Leipzig, so the interpretations of these works have more than a little of historically informed practice about them, while still being mainstream performances. Tempos are generally brisk and textures are immaculate, while the strings play with minimal vibrato and the winds offer distinctive and colorful sonorities. In the Ninth, the vocal quartet is fully equipped for the demanding parts -- the tenor, for example, sings, "Froh, wie seine Sonnen fliegen," at twice the standard tempo -- and the Gewandhaus Choir is both limber in its counterpoint and imposing in its sound. The ideals of authentic period practice are realized without annoying mannerisms, and the music has the dynamic flexibility and robust qualities that everyone wants in Beethoven. Decca's sound quality is crisp and clean, with nearly ideal resonance. © TiVo
CD£11.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

The Gewandhaus Orchestra's history of playing the nine symphonies of Ludwig van Beethoven extends back to 1825, when the composer was still alive, and these masterworks have been a mainstay of its repertoire ever since. After Riccardo Chailly took the helm of the Gewandhaus Orchestra in 2005, the idea of performing the full cycle for Decca under his direction became an imperative, and these recordings of the Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, "Eroica," and the Symphony No. 4 in B flat major were made in 2008 and 2009 respectively, with the Fidelio Overture also recorded in 2009. Chailly's Beethoven draws on the traditions of performance long honored in Leipzig, so the interpretations of the symphonies have more than a little of historically informed practice about them, while still being mainstream performances. Tempos are generally brisk, and textures are immaculate, while the strings play with minimal vibrato, and the winds offer distinctive and colorful sonorities. So the ideals of authentic period practice are realized without annoying mannerisms, and the music has the dynamic flexibility and robust qualities that everyone wants in Beethoven. Decca's sound quality is crisp and clean, with nearly ideal resonance. © TiVo
CD£13.49

Classical - Released April 6, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Continuing his Bruckner cycle on Deutsche Grammophon with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Andris Nelsons presents the Symphony No. 7 in E major, paired with an excerpt from Richard Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen, "Siegfried's Funeral March" from Götterdämmerung. While this symphony is outwardly one of Bruckner's most approachable, particularly in its lyrical opening movement, its energetic Scherzo, and its jubilant Finale, its long, funereal Adagio makes the connection to the gloomy Ring selection more apparent, since this slow movement was composed in anticipation of Wagner's death. It also marks the first time that Bruckner used a quartet of the novel "Wagner tubas," and unusually wrote parts for cymbals, triangle, and timpani at the movement's climax, perhaps symbolizing Wagner's apotheosis. Of historical note, the Gewandhaus Orchestra gave the premiere of the Symphony No. 7 under the baton of Arthur Nikisch, who may have asked Bruckner to include the percussion parts, which have been deleted in some modern performances. Nelsons retains them and offers a solid interpretation of the 1944 Haas edition, avoiding any revisionist changes. Similarly, he gives "Siegfried's Funeral March" a conservative reading that would easily fit into any traditional production. Nelsons has made the inclusion of Wagner excerpts a feature of this cycle thus far, so the unfortunate fallout of the "War of the Romantics" still takes its toll on Bruckner, who never wanted to be involved in it. All the same, this live performance of the symphony is representative of Bruckner at his most accessible, and Deutsche Grammophon's vibrant and focused sound is exceptional in the concert setting. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 7, 2008 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

As an admirer and conductor of Robert Schumann's four symphonies, Gustav Mahler felt obliged to make extensive revisions to help clarify textures, bring vivid colors to passages where opportunities for brilliance had been missed, and make myriad changes in dynamics. To a certain extent, Mahler succeeded in making Schumann's music quite a bit sharper and a lot more colorful, but the changes of orchestration in many instances reveal the arranger's hand too plainly, particularly in the brass and woodwind parts, and the mix of Schumann's Romantic scores with Mahler's post-Romantic orchestral effects seems a little weird and disorienting for anyone who knows these works well. Of course, newcomers absolutely should get to know the originals first, and there's no dearth of great recordings available; experienced listeners who make the comparisons between them and Mahler's revisions may well feel that what was good enough already should have been left alone. Yet Riccardo Chailly and the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig have performed a valuable service in recording these much discussed but seldom played versions, and listeners who have been curious about the extent of Mahler's "tampering" may judge for themselves if he went too far. This double-disc package is strongly recommended for Mahler completists, but it is not essential listening for anyone else. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2015 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
Recordings of Brahms' two serenades from the late 1850s are sparse compared with those of the symphonies, perhaps because they're sometimes depicted as preparatory exercises for the mighty four. But they're really not that; they're light works that stand on their own, imbued with the spirit of Classicism, especially that of Haydn, and anyone who loves Brahms knows that his light works are no less profound than his weighty ones. The Serenade No. 1 in D major, Op. 11, is in six movements; the Serenade No. 2 in A major, Op. 16, in five, with each containing both a scherzo and a minuet. That little contrast is key to both the elegance of craft in these works and to the beauty of the readings here by conductor Riccardo Chailly, leading the venerable Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig. Nowhere does Chailly try to push these works toward the Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68, or even the contemporaneous Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Op. 15. Instead he takes them as they are, making them as transparent as possible, letting them breathe and giving them a relaxed, almost joyous quality that does not foreclose the discovery of small details. It may seem surprising to some that musicians as established as Chailly and the Gewandhaus players, who must have performed these works since their teen years, can manage such seemingly spontaneous readings, but there you have it. This is superior early Brahms. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 1986 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released May 5, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Andris Nelsons' first recording with the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig also initiates a Bruckner cycle for Deutsche Grammophon, and this live recording of the frequently revised Symphony No. 3 in D minor is an auspicious start indeed. Using the 1888/1889 version, edited by Leopold Nowak, Nelsons has chosen one of the least controversial variants of the symphony, shorn of its Wagner quotations and trimmed to an hour in duration. For decades, this has been one of the most frequently recorded revisions, and it may signify Nelsons' preferences for this project, perhaps to stick with recognizable Bruckner and to avoid the less familiar originals that have been recorded by several contemporary conductors, including Simone Young, Marcus Bosch, and Yannick Nézet-Séguin. Interestingly, while lacking the Wagner passages, this performance of the Symphony No. 3 has been programmed with the Overture to Tannhäuser, perhaps in the interest of maintaining the historical connection between the composers, even though Bruckner had only quoted passages from Tristan und Isolde and Die Walküre. Nelsons displays great confidence and a feeling for the symphony's wholeness and coherence, while the playing of the Leipzig orchestra is committed and energetic, bringing out the vitality and excitement of the music and making a convincing case for this problematic but indispensable work. Deutsche Grammophon's recording is quite clear and vivid, and even though some audience noises are noticeable, virtually everything can be heard and the brass is utterly magnificent in the climaxes. © TiVo