Similar artists

Albums

£15.99

Chamber Music - Released January 30, 2004 | Mirare

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica
£11.99

Classical - Released April 29, 2016 | Erato - Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
£13.99
£11.99

Classical - Released April 29, 2016 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month
Pianist Nicholas Angelich has earned kudos for recordings of mainstream 19th century repertoire. He doesn't stray far from that mainstream on Dedication, but he does have a novel concept: the three works on the album were each dedicated to the composer of one of the others. The notes to this Erato release sketch out only briefly the relationships among the three composers, who represented different strains in Romantic musical thinking, but recognized and respected the talents of the others. Do the dedications rediscovered here shed new light on the music? Certainly they illuminate aspects of musical thinking that the composers held in common. Liszt's Piano Sonata in B minor was his only mature work designated as an abstract sonata, and its dedication to Schumann, the mid-century carrier of the Beethovenian legacy, perhaps reflects that. Schumann's Kreisleriana, Op. 16, in turn reflects the harmonic adventures of Chopin (of whom Schumann famously enthused, "Hats off, gentlemen, a genius!), and Chopin's pair of études from Op. 10 are works of near-Lisztian virtuosity. Angelich does a fine job of delineating these aspects, for instance with a restrained Liszt B minor that emphasizes its sonata-form shapes. A logical, enjoyable Romantic piano recital.
£9.49

Classical - Released May 10, 2005 | Mirare

Distinctions Choc de Classica
£7.99

Classical - Released May 9, 2011 | Warner Classics

Booklet
"Bach purifies me: he offers me a new view on life, never mind what he brings in purely pianistic terms," said U.S.-born and Paris-trained pianist Nicholas Angelich. None of this makes a great deal of sense; Bach of course brought nothing in purely pianistic terms, and purification isn't something his patrons and audiences would have much associated with his secular keyboard music. What you're getting here is old-school Romantic Bach, with pedals, crescendos, a whole palette of articulation and attack, and in general an episodic freedom in its approach to the notes on the page. If that's what you're after, Angelich may fill the bill. His recording clocks in at 79 minutes, 58 seconds, just two seconds shy of the usual maximum for a single CD. This is longer than most recordings (although there are a few that spill over onto a second disc), but his variations aren't especially slow for the most part; the extra time comes mostly in the bafflingly deliberate treatment of the opening aria, its return at the end, and several of the slow variations. Those slow variations are given very well-sculpted readings, and in general Angelich has the technical chops and the sheer variety to hold your interest over long stretches of music. The deeper architecture of this massive set of variations, on which so many pianists focus, are little in evidence, and Angelich applies so many twists and turns to the earlier variations that the sense of approaching a climax in the profound final sections is diminished. But Angelich is certainly not boring or pedantic, and your mileage may vary. The pianist is very well served by Virgin Classics' engineers, who clearly capture the smallest details of his phrasing.
£30.99

Classical - Released November 17, 2017 | Warner Classics

£11.99

Classical - Released September 21, 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet
In several ways, this is a completely fresh reading of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, and Piano Concerto No. 5 in E flat major, Op. 73 ("Emperor"). Given the sheer volume of interpretations on the market, that's not an easy thing to achieve, and regardless of what your impressions may be of what pianist Nicholas Angelich and conductor Laurence Equilbey have accomplished here, this is the kind of recording that demands to be heard. There are historically oriented performances of Beethoven, but this one falls into a rarer category, for Beethoven at least: the recording that is informed by historical practices, but does not submerge itself in them. Angelich's piano is an early, 20th century Pleyel instrument, pointed and clear without being especially loud. The Insula Orchestra is small and plays on period instruments. The result is a light, transparent sound that evokes the orchestras of Beethoven's time in its dimensions. Equilbey and Angelich further state that they aim to cultivate an improvisatory feel in these two concertos. In the Piano Concerto No. 4 this works beautifully. The general dynamic level is quiet; the music seems to rise at the beginning from a point of stasis; and the whole reading seems spontaneous, even though it has clearly been worked out down to small details. The Piano Concerto No. 5, self-consciously grand, would seem a more difficult candidate for such treatment, but Angelich delivers percussive power where necessary, for instance in the big piano entrance and arpeggio flourish in the first movement. And sample the finale, around the three-minute mark for instance, where Angelich and Equilbey find a strong element of dialogue that has escaped other musicians. The sound engineering from Insula's Seine Musicale home base is an excellent aid to the whole enterprise, which is strongly recommended.
£5.49

Classical - Released July 14, 2014 | harmonia mundi

£20.99

Classical - Released January 15, 2007 | Warner Classics

£9.49

Classical - Released July 13, 2010 | harmonia mundi

£13.99

Classical - Released January 9, 2006 | Warner Classics

£13.99
£11.99

Classical - Released September 21, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet