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Alternative & Indie - Released September 28, 2012 | Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 2, 2013 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 20, 2005 | WM UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
If you're going to pillage someone else's ideas, then go for broke. Because even if you find yourself crammed between the barriers of creative space, utterly at a loss for ideas, expression, or thought, you'd still have a self-respect buzzing in your ear like a mad angelic insect, putting down the newspaper and taking out a cigar to remind you that, hell, if want to sound like Radiohead when even Thom Yorke doesn't want to sound like Radiohead, you might as well take it to preposterous, bombastic, over-the-top levels. Add church organs, mental electronics, riffs bouncing off each other like the monolithic screams in 2001: A Space Odyssey, and you'll finally be in position to crack skulls like coconuts and make the world's speakers ooze gooey blood. ~ Dean Carlson
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 7, 1999 | Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The musical touchstone for the British trio Muse is obviously Radiohead and that fact is crystal clear from the smoldering opening cut, "Sunburn." Their John Leckie-produced debut, Showbiz, is strong on angst-filled vocals, esoteric lyrics, and dramatic shifts in sonic dynamics. Hailing from rural England, singer/guitarist Matthew Bellamy, bassist Chris Wolstenholme, and drummer Dominic Howard average 20 years of age, so there's plenty of potential for them to grow into a sound that is more of their own. In the meantime, Bellamy does an impressive job of aping the quirky, nervous vocal tic of Thom Yorke on songs like the mid-tempo, Mellotron-driven "Muscle Museum," and he cuts loose vocally on the soaring "Cave" and on the lovely, mournful ballad "Unintended." Showbiz hints at the potential in this young band, and it should be of interest to many Radiohead fans. ~ Tom Demalon
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 19, 2006 | Warner Bros.

Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
Naysayers listen up: Muse refuses to be the "next" Radiohead. Since forming in 1997, the alternative rock trio has continuously battled comparisons to the famed Oxford group while ambitiously creating a sound of its own, mixing elements of glam, pop, and symphonic music into a rock hybrid. British fans have praised the group for years, despite Americans taking until Absolution to discover Muse and give them their rightful props. Whether or not you championed the grand dramatics of Absolution, Muse is a solid, unique band and Black Holes and Revelations defines those strengths with a passion. Rich Costey joins Muse in the co-production of this 11-song set; together, they create the band's most realized and meticulous album to date. "Take a Bow" sets the scene by layering full rock orchestration with waves of synthesizers and percussion, all of it building up to vocalist/guitarist Matthew Bellamy's aching performance of a world torn apart by its own instability. Though frequently compared to Queen's Freddie Mercury and Thom Yorke, Bellamy comes into his own as a vocalist here. He, drummer Dominic Howard, and bassist Chris Wolstenholme pull equal weight throughout, and Muse sounds like a complete band on Black Holes and Revelations. The sultry, swaggering "Supermassive Black Hole" and the razor-edged paranoiac "Assassin" are prime examples of how adamant Muse is about delivering the biggest rock & roll package possible, while "Starlight" proves they write a radio-worthy anthem without jeopardizing their own ethics. Bellamy howls "You and I must fight for our rights/You and I must fight to survive" during the riotous, Rush-like megalomania of "Knights of Cydonia," and it's true -- they've totally fought for their craft on this one. It may have taken four albums for Americans to get with the program, but with Black Holes and Revelations, the whole world should be watching. ~ MacKenzie Wilson
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 5, 2015 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 9, 2018 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 14, 2009 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2004 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 20, 2005 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 19, 2006 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 28, 1991 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 5, 2015 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 15, 2018 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 9, 2018 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 27, 2010 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 3, 2007 | WM UK

Booklet
Whether you view them as dynamic rock & roll rulers or overblown Radiohead knock-offs, it's hard to contend with Muse's strength as a live act. H.A.A.R.P. shows the band strutting its stuff in front of a sold-out audience at Wembley Stadium, with a set list that relies heavily on 2006's Black Holes and Revelations but still dips into the band's back catalog. The accompanying DVD gives a flashy, glitzy face to the music, and the refreshing lack of lightning-fast camera editing helps boost it above the band's previous CD/DVD combo, Hullabaloo Soundtrack. Still, the audio disc holds up quite well on its own, both for its crystal clear sound quality as well as the band's confident performance. Muse's intricate, electronics-laced material isn't the easiest thing to replicate in a live setting, but H.A.A.R.P. sounds as sharp as the band's studio albums, with Matthew Bellamy often adding different guitar flourishes (a brand new riff here, an extended solo there) to make these live renditions unique. And even if a small handful of songs sound nearly identical to their studio counterparts, it's nice to hear a song like "Starlight" -- a tune that has always sounded like it was consciously created for arena-sized crowds -- finally get the proper Wembley Stadium treatment. ~ Andrew Leahey
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 10, 2009 | Warner Bros.

With its titanic guitar solos, symphonic suites, and multi-layered melodies, Muse's fifth album operates under the assumption that bigger is better. This is the very definition of a super-sized album, an album that takes its cues from Queen, its lyrics from science fiction novels, and its delivery from rock opera. It's also the first time that Muse has truly sounded like Muse, as few bands since Queen have so readily explored the intersection of bombast and extravagance. The Resistance is most certainly extravagant -- there are snatches of classical piano entwined throughout, not to mention bilingual lyrics, concert hall percussion, coronet solos, and song titles like "Exogenesis: Symphony, Pt. 2 (Cross-Pollination)" -- but it's also quite beautiful, capable of moving between prog rock choruses and excerpts from Chopin's "Nocturne in E Flat Major" within the same song. Presiding over the mix is frontman Matthew Bellamy, a man who seemingly aspires to be both Brian May and Freddie Mercury. He plays guitar, pounds the piano, and composes the album's orchestral parts, but his strongest asset is his voice, a sky-scraping tenor dripping with so much emotion that it's almost lewd. He croons, whispers, annunciates, and belts with confidence, a combination that makes him one of England's most dazzling singers in recent memory. And since a virtual mountain of voices is better than a single voice (remember: bigger is better), Bellamy also multi-tracks himself, creating towering stacks of harmonies during songs like "Resistance," "Undisclosed Desires," and the colossal "United States of Eurasia (+Collateral Damage)." The band's tendency to pile excess upon excess doesn't always yield strong results, and there's a fine line between, say, the anthemic beauty of "Guiding Light" and the bizarre Timbaland-meets-Depeche Mode ambiance of "Undisclosed Desires." Even so, The Resistance is by and large a fantastic record, culminating in a three-song suite that finds the group jumping from classical movements to guitar fretwork to sweeping, swaggering, operatic rock. Those songs occupy the final 16 minutes of the disc, and while they'd likely make a bigger impact earlier in the track list, their mere presence indicates that Muse is finally growing comfortable with its own aspirations. Black Holes and Revelations may be a more commercial record, but The Resistance is Muse's most realized effort to date. ~ Andrew Leahey
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 30, 2018 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 9, 2018 | Warner Bros.

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