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Electronic - Released November 11, 2011 | Ed Banger Records

Distinctions Album du mois Trax - Sélection Les Inrocks
An uncompromising and occasionally unlistenable antidote to the melodic commercial house of fellow Frenchmen Guetta, Solveig, and Sinclar, Stade 2, the fourth studio album by Quentin Dupieux, aka Mr. Oizo, suggests that his Flat Eric-assisted one-hit wonder status isn't likely to change anytime soon. Dominated by a cavalcade of twisted bleeps, loops, and squiggles, the follow-up to 2008's Lambs Anger is a part hypnotic/part headache-inducing slab of organized chaos, with only the chopped-up ballroom-inspired "Ska" and the early-'90s acid house of "Datsun" offering any respite from the predominantly twitchy acidic sound succinctly summarized by the lone robotic voice on opener "Introeil" ("I recorded some new stuff/I don't know what it is yet/But I like it"). The record is surprisingly palatable when the enigmatic producer plays up to the mischievous side he recently displayed while directing killer car tire flick Rubber, whether it's the "everybody dance now" command on the distinctly undanceable "EDN," the rather sleazy, vinyl-scratching and R1 DJ Annie Mac-sampling techno of "Oral Sax," or the deadpan mechanical tones that underpin the unashamedly silly "Douche Beat." But when he plays it straight, as on the Daft Punk-ish "Cheeree," the more expansive big beat of closer "Druide," and the industrial electro of "Chiffon," the album drifts into the kind of self-indulgent territory that makes it feel far lengthier than its rather brief 32-minute running time. Stade 2 has its moments, but its overall lack of invention suggests that Mr. Oizo is perhaps now channeling his creative streak elsewhere. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released March 15, 1999 | F Communications

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Electronic - Released September 30, 2016 | Ed Banger Records

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Ever since stumbling upon a freak hit in 1999 with the moronically catchy advert soundtrack "Flat Beat," Mr. Oizo (aka French film director Quentin Dupieux) has been one of dance music's most unlikely, even reluctant stars. He's never come close to attempting to replicate the single's success; his subsequent albums and EPs have been knotty, convoluted, and perplexing. They've also generally been exciting and innovative (albeit wildly inconsistent), and have influenced numerous schools of beatmakers. Oizo's sixth non-soundtrack full-length contains far more guests than anything else he's released, and while it might seem on the surface like he's making a delayed bid for commercial viability, one listen affirms that he's still playing by nobody's rules but his own. The majority of the tracks are under three minutes and they often consist of choppy disco samples set at midtempo. The most fractured piece is the minute-long "Oiseaux" (the correct spelling of his moniker is French for "birds"), which rapidly channel surfs between prog-fusion guitar, soul vocals, zippy disco strings, and other sounds. The most vocal-heavy song is "Freezing Out," which features Peaches doing her thing over a slow, bass-heavy groove collage that has some sort of Paul's Boutique/"Going Back to Cali" thing going on. "Hand in the Fire," Oizo's collaboration with pop star Charli XCX, appears near the end of the album, but it might as well be a completely different song than the version that was released as a single in 2015. While that one was a proper pop tune (a rarity in Dupieux's catalog if there ever was one), this take only uses a few lines of Charli's vocals before a stomping beat and siren-like EDM synths take over. He attempts to play it even straighter on "The End of the World," which starts out as a fun rave flashback before a blurry voice repeats "now it's gonna be exciting to watch the end of the world." Unfortunately, the track settles into a predictable dance beat after that and doesn't do much else. Then again, considering that the track was co-produced by Skrillex, it's a relief that it didn't end up being more obnoxious. Oizo fares much better when he's being his own twisted self. "Your Liver" continues his longstanding usage of cheeky computer voices, proposing "give me your liver and I'll give you my heart" over a vaguely industrial-ish beat. "Goulag Drums" is a head-spinner with fast, metallic drums diced with precision. "No Tony" is a venture into French rap, with a sunny, lighthearted lyric saying something about pepperoni pizza over a very MF Doom-like beat. All Wet will undoubtedly confound anyone who might still be expecting another "Flat Beat" out of Oizo (although most of those people probably stopped paying attention ages ago), or any EDM fans curiously tuning in because of the track with Skrillex. For anyone who shares Dupieux's warped sense of humor and has been eagerly following his career, this is yet another fascinatingly weird Mr. Oizo album. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Electronic - Released April 24, 2020 | F Communications

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Electronic - Released November 17, 2008 | Ed Banger Records

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Electronic - Released December 20, 2013 | Ed Banger Records

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Electronic - Released March 22, 2019 | Ed Banger Records

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Electronic - Released January 1, 1999 | F Communications

The album debut for Quentin Dupieux may not have received worldwide distribution had it not been for its most publicized track, the notorious Levi's advert and crossover hit named "Flat Beat." But it's doubtful Dupieux will turn into a one-hit wonder -- and if he does, there's always his directing career -- since Analog Worms Attack is an inventive album that somehow marries the experimental side of techno (Cristian Vogel, Laurent Garnier) with the outrageous flair of novelty tracks usually seen on, well, television commercials. Even including "Flat Beat" (which was wisely added only as a bonus track), the highlights are "Monophonic Shit" and "No Day Massacre," two tracks that blend surprisingly deep grooves and oddball effects. It's not so much a sense of humor that Dupieux displays here; it's closer to the playful side of quasi-pop electronica fashioned by Mouse on Mars and Like a Tim. Fans of the trademarked "Flat Beat" sound will find much to love as well ("Smoking Tape" and "Flat 55" are most similar to the hit), making Analog Worms Attack a left-field treat for both pop-culture seekers and genuine music fans. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released April 3, 2020 | Ed Banger Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released November 8, 2010 | Ed Banger Records

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Electronic - Released November 17, 2014 | Brainfeeder

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Electronic - Released November 10, 2008 | Ed Banger Records

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Electronic - Released October 11, 1999 | F Communications

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Electronic - Released June 14, 2004 | F Communications

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Dance - Released September 19, 2005 | F Communications

The head of F.com (the French label on which this album was originally issued) has declared it to be "unbearable" listening. When the person in charge of selling your album is saying things like that, you might get a bit discouraged. Not Quentin Dupieux, who writes and records strange electronic music under the name Mr. Oizo. He takes such comments in stride, and in all fairness, Moustache (Half a Scissor) is actually far from unlistenable. Willfully bizarre, yes; whimsically weird, yes. But his beats are funky enough, and stop just short of the brokenness threshold. And though there's not much here in the way of melody and the album's overall sound is as chilly and astringent as an alcohol swab, there's a wild variety of colors and textures here to hold your attention. Check, for example, the vocal samples on "Straw Anxious" and the sly organ sounds on "Nurse Bob." The stuttering keyboard sounds on "Stunt" hark back to the glory days of 1980s synth pop, while "Square Surf" nods to house music in a friendly way without quite embracing it. Even at a party you might not play this album all the way through, but any one of these tracks is guaranteed to change the tenor of the conversations for a moment, and probably for the better. © Rick Anderson /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 3, 2000 | F Communications

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Electronic - Released July 12, 2010 | Ed Banger Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 29, 1997 | F Communications

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Electronic - Released January 1, 1998 | F Communications

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Electronic - Released March 16, 2009 | Ed Banger Records