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Rock - Released October 18, 2013 | UDR

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio
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Rock - Released October 18, 2013 | UDR

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk
In the history of music, there are few true mavericks on the level of the legendary Lemmy, a man who seems to do his own thing without any concern for what anyone else thinks about it. This level of confidence has made Motörhead a timeless institution in the world of rock & roll, and on Aftershock, the band's 21st album, it's clear they're not even close to running out of gas. While the band's elemental sound doesn't show much in the way of innovation, the spirit of true rock is so strong within it that it doesn't really matter. These guys aren't influenced so much as they are influences, and as the elder statesmen of being badass, Motörhead deliver yet another show of strength, putting on a master class in the sort of down-and-dirty grit and grime that most other bands can only summon ironically. Although Aftershock probably won't go down in history as one of the band's great albums, it serves as a reminder of Motörhead's, and by that virtue Lemmy's, status as true originals who play by a set of rules that only they seem privy to. Fans of the band, or really anyone who has ever dared to cut the sleeves off of a jean jacket or carved a skull into a desk with a knife, would do well to pay tribute by checking this one out, lest they incur the wrath of Kilmister. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 8, 1980 | Sanctuary Records

This is not the first time Motörhead’s Ace of Spades (an album onto which fans of Lemmy Kilmister have formed a veritable cult) has been reissued. While the 1996 version included three bonus tracks, the 25th anniversary edition released in 2005 was a lot more generous and offered a second disc with 15 songs, mostly alternative versions. 15 years later, the album is forty years old. Now is no better time to delve into rarities found in this new ultimate Deluxe edition that all fans owe it to themselves to own. With forty additional songs compared to the last Deluxe edition released in 2005, this Ace of Spades reissue’s biggest draw is the two complete concerts that are included, one which took place in Parc Expo in New Orleans on the 5th of March 1981, the other in White Hall in Belfast on the 23rd of December of the same year. The live recordings are true witness to the London band’s fiery stage presence and are simultaneously essential compliments to the famous official live show recorded for vinyl at the time, No Sleep ‘til Hammersmith. While the instrumental tracks are dispensable, the return of alternative versions allows those that were put to one side on the previous anniversary edition to have their say. But what would this beautiful world be without the album that justified the release of this Deluxe package? Remastered once more, the tracks which made the hit record’s success improve in definition without losing any of their vital dirtiness which resulted in a savage coupling between hard rock’s strength and punk energy. Twelve atom bombs which, while they were highly influential for the future thrash rock scene, are pure rock’n’roll songs. Violent as they are.While the tracks on Ace of Spades are similar to those heard on Overkill and Bomber, the sound on this record is a large leap forward. Part of its success can be put down to Vic Maile’s production (who previously worked on Hawkwind albums, Lemmy’s previous band, but also with the Who, Chuck Berry…). Motörhead’s sound is stronger and better produced on this album. Lemmy would explain that Vic worked on Ace of Spades according to his instincts, knowing all there was to know about rock’n’roll. Thanks to this collaboration, the sound of Phil Animal Taylor’s drums and Fast Eddie Clarke’s guitars is explosive (Love Me Like a Reptile, Live to Win) on an album that puts the pedal to the medal without ever changing gear. Whether it be a mere coincidence or scientific reality, Ace of Spades celebrates its fortieth birthday the same year as another monument to hard rock, AC/DC’s Back in Black. Amidst all the euphoria, no one will forget that it is also the fifth anniversary of the death of the band’s charismatic bassist and singer. A legendary frontman who has no need to be canonised to enter Rockstar heaven. There’s one simple reason for this: Lemmy is God. © Chief Brody/Qobuz  
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Rock - Released June 29, 1981 | Sanctuary Records

Countless box sets and other reissues have been brought out in tribute to one of the world's greatest rock'n'roll bands following the death of its leader, Lemmy Kilmister. But if there is one live show that deserves a remaster and a re-release, it's surely the biggest one of all time. Released in 1981, less than a year after the legendary Ace of Spades, No Sleep 'til Hammersmith, the band's first official live album, went straight to the top of the English charts upon release. Made up of tracks from three different shows (two in Newcastle, one in Leeds), this small incendiary bomb has already been reissued in 1996 and 2001. But this 40th anniversary version offers never-before-heard bonuses in addition to the original remastered album, which is sure to delight fans. This was an outfit whose music was better enjoyed live than at home, and that meant that No Sleep 'til Hammersmith needed the most faithful restitution possible if it was to convey the intensity of the trio's performance. This is also the case with this anniversary edition.Welcome to the fiery pit. Come and enjoy it with what was then the loudest act in the world. Motörhead starts blasting with Ace of Spades, the track that made them a legend. They are only three musicians, but they storm across the sound spectrum like a horde. The rest of the tracklist is no less intense, alternating deftly between wild rampages and the songs at a slightly less furious tempo before finishing strongly with Overkill, Bomber and Motörhead. The rough, saturated sound of Lemmy's bass mixes magically with  "Fast" Eddie Clarke's guitar, backed by Phil "Philthy Animal" Taylor's crazy drums. Previous reissues have been embellished here and there, with this or that bonus piece drawn from the different performances, but No Sleep 'til Hammersmith-40th Anniversary Edition stands out as the ultimate version, because it offers the entirety of the three concerts from which the original was drawn. Not surprisingly, the setlist is the same every time. Some songs are played better or with more conviction on some nights than others, but hearing them all together, along with the crowd reactions, makes for a much more coherent experience. It's enough to shine a whole new light on one of the best live albums in the history of hard rock which, four decades after its release, remains as fresh as ever.  © Chief Brody / Qobuz
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Metal - Released April 23, 2021 | Motörhead Music

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There won't be any more studio albums, and most of the band's B-sides have been discarded, which means that only live recordings and reissues remain to be released as monuments to one of rock'n'roll's greatest ever groups. On 5 December 2012, Motörhead played one of their biggest shows in Germany, at the Velodrom in Berlin. 12,000 loyal followers turned out to see the band and its leader, the unforgettable Lemmy Kilmister. The singer-bassist was not in top form, as he was already severely weakened by the disease which would take his life almost exactly three years later. But in spite of everything, his unflagging charisma made its mark on the performance that evening. Supported as never before by the infernal duo of Phil Campbell and Mikkey Dee, the band were able to put on a performance that was truly "Louder than Everything Else".That night, Motörhead played 15 songs and were on stage for just over an hour. Of course, the greatest classics were all there, from Overkill to Ace of Spades, as well as Over the Top and Killed By Death. The engine took a minute to really get started, but the second half of the set was a real Motörhead, with all the on-stage energy that was the group's hallmark. The band's power owes a lot to impeccable timing from the drummer, who gives a little bit extra to make up for any weakness on the part of the singer-bassist. Louder Than Noise... Live in Berlin lacks the freshness or the raw strength of the concerts of the 80s, but it does have an incredible steam-roller robustness, forged over years of touring after the band had settled into its definitive line-up.This is an overwhelming arsenal of rock'n'roll, and it has been well-served by the mixing work done by Cameron Webb. Webb has worked faithfully with the band for years, producing the albums Bad Magic, Aftershock, The Wörld Is Yours, Motörizer, Kiss of Death, and Inferno, as well as various other official live releases. It is an hour of sound and fury; but above all an hour of joy for an audience which will always remember its idols. This is a new live compilation to add to the trophy cabinet: a tribute to an artist who, even after his death, is still hailed by fans as a god of rock. © Chief Brody / Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 1, 2017 | Motörhead Music

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Even from above, up on his cloud, Lemmy finds a way to stay in touch. Although this Motörhead album released during the summer of 2017 is in fact a compilation album recorded between 1992 and 2015 by the singer/bass player - who passed away on December 28th, 2015 - and his accomplices. Titled Under Cöver, it is indeed ONLY comprised of covers. While the menu is mostly metal (Judas Priest, Ted Nugent, Ozzy Osbourne, Twisted Sister, Metallica, Dio, etc.), it also features unexpected reinterpretations such as God Save The Queen by the Sex Pistols (2000), Rockaway Beach by the Ramones (2002), Heroes by David Bowie (2015) and two Rolling Stones titles, Jumpin’ Jack Flash (2001) and Sympathy For The Devil (2015). Of course, it’s in this kind of repertoire that the late leader of Motörhead is at his most exciting; preserving his inimitable voice sculpted with Jack Daniel’s to make these classics his own. © MD/Qobuz
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Rock - Released August 1, 2013 | Sanctuary Records

There have been dozens and dozens of Motörhead compilations released over the decades, but the first one remains definitive, even if it's not perfect. Released in 1984 as a gap-filler -- for Motörhead were regrouping in the wake of the bandmember shuffling that followed the odd Another Perfect Day album -- No Remorse compiled two-dozen songs across two discs (latter-day editions adding a good serving of bonus tracks, too). Many of the band's best songs to date are here, like "Ace of Spades," "Stay Clean," "Overkill," "Bomber," and "Iron Fist." There are also four new recordings that were cut exclusively for No Remorse: "Killed by Death," "Snaggletooth," "Steal Your Face," and "Locomotive." These four songs were cut by the newly instated four-piece lineup that would go on to record Orgasmatron (1986): guitarists Michael Burston and Phil Campbell, drummer Peter Gill, and of course, bassist/vocalist Lemmy. These new recordings make No Remorse more than a standard greatest-hits package, as do the number of stray recordings compiled here as well. For starters, No Remorse rounds up "Please Don't Touch" and "Emergency," which were released on a 1981 split EP with Girlschool, St. Valentines Day Massacre. It also rounds up an early single ("Louie, Louie") as well as a pair of B-sides ("Too Late, Too Late" and "Like a Nightmare") and a tossed-about live cover "Leaving Here." More than just a simple overview, No Remorse is a collection that caters to newbies as well as completists. And furthermore, it plays well, as the new songs and stray material are sequenced toward the end of each LP side, so the collection ebbs and flows between the familiar and unfamiliar, between the great and good. Granted, a straightforward best-of collection may be more suitable to newcomers looking for a one-stop compilation. For instance, No Remorse doesn't account for the wealth of music Motörhead would release post-1984, and too, it misses a lot of great songs that could have taken the place of the odds and ends rounded up here. So a straight-ahead, single-disc chronological survey would be a nice alternative, especially one that accounts for late-'80s highlights like "Deaf Forever," "Orgasmatron," "Rock 'n' Roll," and "Eat the Rich." But there's something to be said for tradition, and No Remorse is to Motörhead what We Sold Our Soul for Rock 'n' Roll is to Black Sabbath -- an age-old collection that every metalhead seemed to own at some point, the one that seemed to define the band for generations on end. No Remorse is one of those classic albums, no doubt. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 8, 2013 | Sanctuary Records

Released in 1981, the live album No Sleep 'Til Hammersmith recaps the highlights from the legendary run of albums Motörhead released during the prior few years, namely Overkill, Bomber, and Ace of Spades. The band's lesser self-titled debut album is also accounted for here with two inclusions ("Motörhead" and "Iron Horse"), but by and large, the focus is on the standout songs from the aforementioned trio of classics. This alone makes No Sleep 'Til Hammersmith noteworthy, for it plays like a greatest-hits set, opening perfectly with "Ace of Spades." But what makes it all the more noteworthy -- and more than simply a run-of-the-mill, gap-filling live album -- is the performance: in a word, it's breakneck. The trio of Lemmy (bass and vocals), "Fast" Eddie Clarke (guitar), and "Philthy Animal" Taylor (drums) absolutely rips loose through this 11-song set, upping the intensity and speed of the already intense and speedy studio recordings. Yes, believe it or not, these performances are even more crazed than their studio-recorded counterparts. Of course, the fidelity isn't as clear and the instruments aren't nearly as in relief, since this is a live recording (and while it's of high quality for live recordings of its day, it's relatively lo-fi by today's standards). Still, the breakneck nature of this performance distinguishes No Sleep 'Til Hammersmith from its studio predecessors, making it an excellent, recommended complement to those essentials. Moreover, it's an important release because it captures Motörhead live during the peak of the classic lineup's rise to fame. Motörhead could do no wrong at this point in time, as they were laying the foundation for the coming thrash movement, in a way, and their winning streak continues here on No Sleep 'Til Hammersmith, one of the best live metal albums of all time. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released August 8, 2013 | Sanctuary Records

With the 1980 release of Ace of Spades, Motörhead had their anthem of anthems -- that is, the title track -- the one trademark song that would summarize everything that made this early incarnation of the band so legendary, a song that would be blasted by legions of metalheads for generations on end. It's a legendary song, for sure, all two minutes and 49 bracing seconds of it. And the album of the same name is legendary as well, among Motörhead's all-time best, often considered their single best, in fact, along with Overkill. Ace of Spades was Motörhead's third great album in a row, following the 1979 releases of Overkill and Bomber, respectively. Those two albums have a lot in common with Ace of Spaces. The classic lineup -- Lemmy (bass and vocals), "Fast" Eddie Clarke (guitar), and "Philthy Animal" Taylor (drums) -- is still in place and sounding as alive and crazed as ever. The album is still rock-solid, boasting several superlative standouts. Actually, besides the especially high number of standouts on Ace of Spades -- at least relative to Bomber, which wasn't quite as strong overall as Overkill had been -- the only key difference between this 1980 album and its two 1979 predecessors is the producer, in this case Vic Maile. The result of his work isn't all that different from that of Jimmy Miller, the longtime Rolling Stones producer who had worked on Overkill and Bomber, but it's enough to give Ace of Spades a feeling distinct from its two very similar-sounding predecessors. This singular sound (still loud and in your face, rest assured), along with the exceptionally strong songwriting and the legendary stature of the title track, makes Ace of Spades the ideal Motörhead album if one were to choose one and only one studio album. It's highly debatable whether Ace of Spades is tops over the breakthrough Overkill, as the latter is more landmark because of its earlier release, and is somewhat rougher around the edges, too. Either way, Ace of Spades rightly deserves its legacy as a classic. There's no debating that. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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Metal - Released August 28, 2015 | Motörhead Music

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A lot happened to Motörhead -- or more accurately to Motörhead's once and future leader, Lemmy Kilmister -- after the release of 2013's Aftershock, and most of it wasn't good. Lemmy, who along with Keith Richards seemed to be the rocker most likely to survive Armageddon (and why hasn't someone written a comedy where those two chat while foraging for liquor and cigarettes in the wake of World War III?), was abruptly revealed as all too mortal as he found himself struggling with heart trouble, diabetes, and other maladies, and more than a few fans blanched when they saw the widely circulated online video of a weakened Lemmy pacing off stage at the 2013 Wacken Open Air Festival, too frail to complete Motörhead's set. 2015's Bad Magic was the first Motörhead album after Lemmy cut back on liquor and tobacco (and had a defibrillator implanted), and returned to the road, and the truth is the mighty frontman sounds older and weaker for the ordeal. That said, it doesn't hurt as much as you might imagine; on Bad Magic, Lemmy sounds bloodied but unbowed, an ancient soldier who doesn't know the meaning of surrender and will happily run you through with a sword as he draws his last breath. If Lemmy croaks or wheezes more often on Bad Magic than he has before, it suits his tales of foul-minded bastards and their despicable deeds, and it's a fine fit with the bloody-minded attitude that has always been Motörhead's stock in trade. Just as importantly, Lemmy's bass work remains thunderous, as thick and dirty as it was in his salad days, and guitarist Phil Campbell and drummer Mikkey Dee continue to bring the noise in inspired fashion. Musically, this album brings very little that's new to the group's playbook, but they still sound like Motörhead, something thousands of younger and more agile bands simply cannot do, and if you're wondering if Motörhead can still kick your butt and blow out your speakers in 2015, the answers are "Hell yeah" and "You know it." And if the cover of "Sympathy for the Devil" seems an odd way to end this album, if anyone in metal can sound truly convincing as Old Scratch and oddly charming in his pursuit of evil, Lemmy's in the running, and Bad Magic suggests the man and his band might just be indestructible after all. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 8, 2013 | Sanctuary Records

This particular Best of Motörhead release is a double-disc set on the Sanctuary subsidiary Metal-Is, and it's one of the very, very few Motörhead collections that tries to draw material from throughout the band's career. The compilers couldn't secure the rights to everything, and as such, there's nothing here from albums like 1916 or Bastards. But there are tracks from the later Overnight Sensation, Snake Bite Love, and We Are Motörhead albums, plus four bonus live tracks dating from various points in the group's career. The result isn't a definitive overview, but it is a pretty decent one, and the sound quality is good too. The best pure, concentrated shot of Motörhead is still No Remorse, focusing exclusively as it does on the band's peak early years, but this Best Of isn't a bad choice for someone wanting highlights from their later career as well. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 1, 2013 | Sanctuary Records

Motörhead's landmark second album, Overkill, marked a major leap forward for the band, and it remains one of their all-time best, without question. In fact, some fans consider it their single best, topping even Ace of Spaces. It's a ferocious album, for sure, perfectly showcasing Motörhead's trademark style of no holds barred proto-thrash -- a kind of punk-inflected heavy metal style that is sloppy and raw yet forceful and in your face. Motörhead, the band's self-titled debut from 1977, had been rush-recorded, and its stripped-down, super-raw sound wasn't all that impressive, at least not relative to what would follow. Overkill is what followed, recorded in December 1978 and January 1979, and released not long thereafter. The band's sound is fully formed here, and it totally explodes right off the bat on the five-minute title track. A number of Motörhead standards follow, among them "Stay Clean" and "No Class." Produced by Jimmy Miller, who had helmed a number of classic Rolling Stones albums (Beggars Banquet, Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers, Exile on Main St., Goats Head Soup), Overkill sounds wonderful, especially on the numerous remastered editions of this album. The band's classic lineup -- Lemmy (bass and vocals), "Fast" Eddie Clarke (guitar), and "Philthy Animal" Taylor (drums) -- is well in place here, and they seem eager to rip loose wildly on every single song. This, in addition to the solid track listing and Miller's production, makes Overkill a perfect Motörhead album. Several great ones would follow, of course, but Overkill was the first of the great ones, and quite possibly the greatest of all. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 25, 2019 | Sanctuary Records

Lemmy Kilmister's initial plan for his first post-Hawkwind project -- he was unceremoniously shown the door in 1975 -- was to immediately begin operating under the moniker "Bastard". Potential marketing problems aside, it seemed like a fairly decent fit after his turn from epic space rock to tightly wound proto-thrash, but "Motorhead" -- the last song he had written for Hawkwind -- ultimately won out. 1979 was a pivotal year for the group, having inked a deal with EMI-distributed Bronze Records and released two of their most definitive albums. Issued in March 1979, Overkill was the band's sophomore full-length effort and netted them their first Top 40 single via the punitive title cut. Bomber arrived later that October and clawed its way to number 12 on the U.K. Albums chart. The aptly named 1979 box set collects both of these releases -- part of BMG's back catalog reissue series, they will also be available individually -- as well as a slew of live cuts and supplemental material. Released to coincide with the albums' 40th anniversary and lovingly encased in a gnarly black biker jacket box, the vinyl-only collection includes half-speed mastered 180-gram vinyl reissues of Bomber and Overkill, a pair of double-live LPs featuring previously unreleased material from the era, a collection of B-sides and outtakes, a 40-page magazine, an Overkill sheet music book, a "No Class" 7" single, a Bomber tour program, and a 1979 badge set. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 5, 2007 | Golden Core

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Rock - Released December 8, 1979 | Parlophone UK

Motörhead’s debut album has a very interesting story. It was finished in 1976 but was turned down by United Artists who deemed it too violent and raucous. On Parole wasn’t released until the end of 1979 on the label Bronze which would shape the trio’s future. The trio had already made waves by releasing two benchmark albums that year: Overkill and Bomber. Initially recorded with Larry Wallis on vocals and guitar, Lucas Fox on drums and of course the unstoppable Lemmy Kilmister on bass and vocals, On Parole was released in an already-modified version since Philthy “Animal” Taylor, who had become the group’s drummer in the meantime, was asked to re-record most of Fox’s parts (only the track Lost Johnny remained unchanged). Five of the nine tracks had already appeared on the group’s first eponymous album (1977) but that didn’t matter – it was time to capitalise on the wind in their sails. This was another time, with other norms. What was originally considered raucous hardly raised any eyebrows four years later. Vibrator could almost pass for sped-up Beach Boys with its sweet chorus, while Iron Horse/Born To Lose is, strictly speaking, blues. Hugely influenced by MC5, Motörhead’s hard rock was still far away from their hectic Ace Of Spades. On Parole is particularly interesting album because it showcases the influences that Lemmy has often cited over the years, which became much harder to detect in his music later on. The cherry on the cake is that this “definitive” remastered re-release is supplemented by six demos produced by Dave Edmunds, the very first producer of the LP who gave up halfway. Dusted down magnificently, it’s almost a shame that the whole album didn’t benefit from his signature. It would have perfectly suited the trio that later became the rock legends we know today. Beautiful archives! © Charlélie Arnaud/Qobuz
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Rock - Released March 24, 1979 | Sanctuary Records

Motörhead's landmark second album, Overkill, marked a major leap forward for the band, and it remains one of their all-time best, without question. In fact, some fans consider it their single best, topping even Ace of Spaces. It's a ferocious album, for sure, perfectly showcasing Motörhead's trademark style of no holds barred proto-thrash -- a kind of punk-inflected heavy metal style that is sloppy and raw yet forceful and in your face. Motörhead, the band's self-titled debut from 1977, had been rush-recorded, and its stripped-down, super-raw sound wasn't all that impressive, at least not relative to what would follow. Overkill is what followed, recorded in December 1978 and January 1979, and released not long thereafter. The band's sound is fully formed here, and it totally explodes right off the bat on the five-minute title track. A number of Motörhead standards follow, among them "Stay Clean" and "No Class." Produced by Jimmy Miller, who had helmed a number of classic Rolling Stones albums (Beggars Banquet, Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers, Exile on Main St., Goats Head Soup), Overkill sounds wonderful, especially on the numerous remastered editions of this album. The band's classic lineup -- Lemmy (bass and vocals), "Fast" Eddie Clarke (guitar), and "Philthy Animal" Taylor (drums) -- is well in place here, and they seem eager to rip loose wildly on every single song. This, in addition to the solid track listing and Miller's production, makes Overkill a perfect Motörhead album. Several great ones would follow, of course, but Overkill was the first of the great ones, and quite possibly the greatest of all. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 21, 1977 | Ace Records

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Before forming Motörhead, Ian Kilmister (aka Lemmy) could boast of having been a member of space rock cowboys Hawkwind and a career in horsebreaking (that's horsebreaking, not housebreaking). He was also, to top it all, the son of a vicar. Having been expelled from his former employers after a disagreement with border guards over the contents of his luggage, he took the name for his new band from the final song he'd written for Hawkwind. Together with Larry Wallis of the Pink Fairies and drummer Philthy Animal Taylor, Motörhead recorded a debut album that was rejected by United Artists (you can just imagine the face of the poor guy who got the short straw and had to tell Lemmy), though it was eventually released as On Parole in 1979. As a result, the group expanded with the addition of "Fast" Eddie Clarke on guitar. Wallis then left after just one rehearsal, leaving the classic Motörhead lineup in shape for their debut proper. Rock & roll had never heard the like. Though only a minor chart success, Motörhead patented the group's style: Lemmy's rasping vocal over a speeding juggernaut of guitar, bass, and drums. The lyrical theme was "Don't mess with us" instead of "Don't mess with our hair." Before this, hard rock was about musicianship and exhibitionism. Motörhead, conversely, returned mainstream rock to its most brutal base elements -- no wonder the punks liked them. © Alex Ogg /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released February 26, 1991 | WTG

Lemmy Kilmister had been leading Motörhead for 16 years by the time 1916 was recorded in 1991. Over the years, Motörhead had experienced more than its share of personnel changes -- and in fact, Kilmister was its only remaining original member. But the band's sound hadn't changed much, and time hadn't made its sledgehammer approach any less appealing. As sobering as his reflections on the horrors of World War I are on the title song, he's unapologetically amusing on "Going to Brazil," "Angel City" (an ode to the "beautiful" party people of L.A.), and "Ramones" (which salutes the New York punk band). Whether the subject matter is humorously fun or more serious, Motörhead is as inspired as ever on 1916. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Metal - Released March 9, 1999 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

"We are Motörhead, and we're gonna kick your ass," bellows the inimitable Lemmy Kilmister at the beginning of this relentless live performance, and he means it. Everything Louder Than Everyone Else, taken from a gig in Hamburg, Germany, circa 1998, is all its title promises to be and more. Mixed unbelievably loud and in-your-face, it captures Motörhead's overwhelming live power in all its toothy glory and reflects a veteran band working at the peak of its skill. While much nostalgic mythologizing is made of Motörhead's classic early lineup (featuring Lemmy, "Fast" Eddie Clarke, and "Philthy Animal" Taylor), the fact is, the group has soldiered on since that incarnation and has gotten better along the way. This double-disc set focuses mainly on Motörhead's '90s output, which is astoundingly strong (much better than the band's spotty work in the '80s). One glance at the track listing proves that the group is far from resting on past glories; only a handful of songs from the band's early years -- like "Capricorn" and "Metropolis" -- appear. Instead, blistering versions of latter-day classics like "Burner," "I'm So Bad, Baby I Don't Care," and "Love for Sale" make up the bulk of this devastating set. Fans who were disappointed by Motörhead's last official live album, the flat-sounding No Sleep at All (which was virtually disowned by the band), will be overjoyed with the uncompromised intensity of this album's ferocious production. Additionally, Motörhead's lineup -- featuring the fast hands and feet of drummer Mikkey Dee and the pile-driving guitars of Phil Campbell -- has been intact for longer than any other version of Motörhead, and the group's cohesion and enthusiasm is more than evident here. What's perhaps most amazing of all is that Lemmy's voice hasn't lost any of its jet-engine roar after many years' worth of use and abuse. Great liner notes, including song-by-song comments by Lem himself, along with testimony by fans ranging from Joey Ramone to Tom Arnold, make this record even more entertaining and essential. No Motörhead-banger should be without. © Andy Hinds /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 8, 2021 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Motörhead in the magazine