Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES£20.99
CD£18.49

Electronic - Released May 17, 1999 | Mute, a BMG Company

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Following a notorious flirtation with alternative rock, Moby returned to the electronic dance mainstream on the 1997 album I Like to Score. With 1999's Play, he made yet another leap back toward the electronica base that had passed him by during the mid-'90s. The first two tracks, "Honey" and "Find My Baby," weave short blues or gospel vocal samples around rather disinterested breakbeat techno. This version of blues-meets-electronica is undoubtedly intriguing to the all-important NPR crowd, but it is more than just a bit gimmicky to any techno fans who know their Carl Craig from Carl Cox. Fortunately, Moby redeems himself in a big way over the rest of the album with a spate of tracks that return him to the evocative, melancholy techno that's been a specialty since his early days. The tinkly piano line and warped string samples on "Porcelain" frame a meaningful, devastatingly understated vocal from the man himself, while "South Side" is just another pop song by someone who shouldn't be singing -- that is, until the transcendent chorus redeems everything. Surprisingly, many of Moby's vocal tracks are highlights; he has an unerring sense of how to frame his fragile vocals with sympathetic productions. Occasionally, the similarities to contemporary dance superstars like Fatboy Slim and Chemical Brothers are just a bit too close for comfort, as on the stale big-beat anthem "Bodyrock." Still, Moby shows himself back in the groove after a long hiatus, balancing his sublime early sound with the breakbeat techno evolution of the '90s. © John Bush /TiVo
CD£15.49

Electronic - Released August 1, 2013 | Mute, a BMG Company

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Following a notorious flirtation with alternative rock, Moby returned to the electronic dance mainstream on the 1997 album I Like to Score. With 1999's Play, he made yet another leap back toward the electronica base that had passed him by during the mid-'90s. The first two tracks, "Honey" and "Find My Baby," weave short blues or gospel vocal samples around rather disinterested breakbeat techno. This version of blues-meets-electronica is undoubtedly intriguing to the all-important NPR crowd, but it is more than just a bit gimmicky to any techno fans who know their Carl Craig from Carl Cox. Fortunately, Moby redeems himself in a big way over the rest of the album with a spate of tracks that return him to the evocative, melancholy techno that's been a specialty since his early days. The tinkly piano line and warped string samples on "Porcelain" frame a meaningful, devastatingly understated vocal from the man himself, while "South Side" is just another pop song by someone who shouldn't be singing -- that is, until the transcendent chorus redeems everything. Surprisingly, many of Moby's vocal tracks are highlights; he has an unerring sense of how to frame his fragile vocals with sympathetic productions. Occasionally, the similarities to contemporary dance superstars like Fatboy Slim and Chemical Brothers are just a bit too close for comfort, as on the stale big-beat anthem "Bodyrock." Still, Moby shows himself back in the groove after a long hiatus, balancing his sublime early sound with the breakbeat techno evolution of the '90s. © John Bush /TiVo
CD£15.49
18

Electronic - Released June 14, 2004 | Mute, a BMG Company

In one of the two essays in the liner notes for 18, Moby alludes to his past as a "rigid" idealist about life and music, expressing that he's tried to open himself and hoping that he's succeeded. In a way, he already succeeded with his previous album, Play, a remarkable record that cannily used field recordings and blues as the basis for an expert set of modern electronica -- through repeated exposure (every song was licensed for a commercial or a movie) and sheer hard work, it became a massive hit, unlike most albums in its genre, establishing Moby as one of the few electronica superstars. It also gave him the freedom to make a record as meditative and assured as 18, a quietly seductive set that capitalizes on his status as a star in the sense that he takes complete freedom to make music that isn't necessarily hip. Essentially, this is a lateral move away from Play, abandoning its attention-grabbing musical thesis of turning the past into the present -- there are still hints of roots music, yet they're usually telegraphed through soulful vocals that have always been a staple of house and dance music -- and returning to his bedrock of dance and electronic music, yet presented with the skill he illustrated on Play, a new open-heartedness and, yes, a maturity previously unheard in his music. Maturity is often seen as a death-knell criticism, especially in a perpetually fashion-conscious genre like electronica, but this is only a good thing here, because it means that Moby not only creates a shimmering, reflective mood from the outset, but that he sustains it throughout the 18 songs, as the album shifts from pop and soul songs to soaring instrumental stretches, letting the sound deepen and change colors with each new track. Cynics could snipe and say this is coffeehouse, yuppie electronica or claim that he's done nothing new with this record, and they'd be right only in the coldest, literal sense that it would appeal to upscale urban listeners and that he's not really breaking new ground, only consolidating his strengths. Yet that is no small thing -- he has created a record that might not be as wildly eclectic on the surface as Play, and it certainly lacks club hits on the level of "Bodyrock" or "South Side," but it's a warm, enveloping, humanistic record with real emotional resonance, which surely is a noteworthy artistic step forward. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD£15.49

Electronic - Released July 4, 2011 | Mute, a BMG Company

HI-RES£14.99
CD£8.99

Electronic - Released May 15, 2020 | Little Idiot

Hi-Res
All Visible Objects is the 17th studio LP from U.S. dance innovator Moby. Titled after a quote from Herman Melville's Moby Dick, the set is notable for its charitable focus, with profits from each track being given to different charities and nonprofits. Previewed with the single "Power Is Taken," featuring D.H. Peligro and Boogie, the album saw release in March 2020. © David Crone /TiVo
CD£11.99

Electronic - Released March 14, 2005 | Mute, a BMG Company

CD£7.99

Electronic - Released June 29, 2009 | Because Music

CD£11.99

Electronic - Released August 1, 2013 | Mute, a BMG Company

CD£11.99

Pop - Released August 1, 2013 | Mute, a BMG Company

For some it was the pinnacle of his career, for others one of a continued string of triumphs (others doubtless cared not at all, thinking somehow that synth and dancebeats equalled musical insincerity, but such is life). Regardless of how one takes it, Everything Is Wrong shows Moby at a definite high point, and if some tracks are much more memorable and involved than others, those successes alone justify the attention and hype he received in his earliest days. Even more noteworthy is that for all that the album is a definite product of time and place, namely 1994-1995, it stands up to further listens for all the further changes in dance since. Having already made his mark with tracks like "Go," "Next Is the E," and "Move," on Everything Is Wrong Moby attempted to balance out the creation of an album in a complete, single-unit sense with his knack for immediately catchy singles. On the latter point he succeeds perfectly, with the frenetic, jungle-inspired anthemic diva showcase "Feeling So Real" (punctuated just so with English-inspired MC breaks) and the giddily sweet pop-minded house of "Everytime You Touch Me" utterly irresistible. Hints of future changes crop up with the speed metal-via-Ministry reworking of Move EP's "All That I Need Is to Be Loved," but the similarly minded blues/thrash of "What Love" forecasts the ham-handed slogs of Animal Rights all too well. Meanwhile, the string-touched "God Moving Over the Face of the Waters" is a self-consciously beautiful, cinematic meditation on spiritual power that in lesser hands might be cheese but comes across here as truly affecting. If there's an ace in the hole, it's the inspired recruiting of former Hugo Largo vocalist Mimi Goese, who had spent the early '90s well out of the public eye. Her turns on "Into the Blue" and especially the haunting, evocative album-closer "When It's Cold I'd Like to Die" bring out in the best in both musicians. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
HI-RES£23.98
CD£15.98

Electronic - Released March 15, 2019 | Little Idiot

Hi-Res
CD£10.99

Electronic - Released March 31, 2008 | Mute, a BMG Company

On Last Night, Moby is as blissfully out of touch with modern club music as he is current. As he explains (of course) in the album's liner notes, he has been in the thick of New York City club culture since the early '80s, and he takes the opportunity here to pay tribute to a number of dance music strains that have fallen in and out of fashion -- in a couple cases, they've recently fallen back into fashion -- including some angles he hasn't taken in well over a decade. The sturdiest, most appealing tracks tend to be where Moby breaks out with some highly energized combination of rollicking pianos, stabbing keyboards, and random divas, mixing and matching rave, Hi-NRG, and disco: "Everyday It's 1989," "Stars," and "Disco Lies" (featuring a vocalist who is nearly a dead ringer for a young Taylor Dayne) would've had no place on any of the last five Moby albums. What is long maligned and what is trendy sometimes occurs simultaneously, as on "I Love to Move in Here" (featuring Grandmaster Caz), a mid-tempo house track that can be sub-categorized as both hip-house (inciting wicked flashbacks for most haters of either component) and Balearic (as it causes that loosey-goosey, anesthetized-but-still-beaming sensation, prevalent in several of the hippest dance tracks released during 2007 and 2008). The poorly timed, not-so-appealing moments -- "257.zero," "Alice" -- with their distant transmission spoken bits and droning raps, might sound in step whenever the Soul Jazz label gets around to releasing rarity compilations with contents resembling Astralwerks' late-'90s compilations for MTV's Amp program. The disc's latter 20 minutes, containing contemplative, string-laden tracks, would be as suited for the Pure Moods series (i.e., beside Yanni, Dave Koz) as past tracks "Porcelain" and "God Moving Over the Face of the Waters." A good number of Moby fans who began to follow the producer's moves well before Play will be inclined to think of Last Night as the best Moby album since Everything Is Wrong. That the album involves several unself-conscious, rush-inducing tracks (rather than the once-expected token track or two) is enough for that opinion to have validity. Ditto the sensible and drastic reduction of Moby's own vocals. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
CD£19.98

Electronic - Released February 26, 2016 | Little Idiot

CD£13.99

Pop - Released November 6, 2015 | Mute, a BMG Company

Ten thousand early CD copies of Moby's 2005 album Hotel were packaged with a bonus disc, Hotel: Ambient -- an assemblage of restrained, atmospheric, and predominantly beatless tracks. Moby obtained the rights to that extra set and, in late 2014, wisely gave it a separate release as a digital download with three bonus tracks. A triple-vinyl edition was released a few months after that. The material, heavily inspired by Brian Eno's early ambient releases -- certain parts of Music for Airports and On Land, for instance -- is among the producer's best and most nuanced work. It evokes a mix of comfort and slight alienation, and is pleasurable whether placed in the background or heard through total immersion. The bonus cuts, including the gently swarming "May 4 Two" and a 16-minute version of the weightless and elegiac "Live Forever" are enhancements rather than completist lures. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
CD£11.99

Electronic - Released August 1, 2013 | Mute, a BMG Company

Considering that Moby's music is most effective in small doses, perhaps it shouldn't be a surprise that the compilation I Like to Score is a strong record. However, it does come as a surprise, since Moby's music usually sounds too insular for the kind of shifting, provocative atmospherics needed for effective film music. Here, on this collection of cinematic instrumental work, Moby demonstrates that he can capture the mood and feeling of a film while retaining his musical identity. Nothing here is particularly complex, and not all of it works -- his reworking of John Barry's "James Bond Theme" sounds like a major studio's idea of what the kids are listening to these days -- but by and large, I Like to Score is every bit as effective as Moby's official releases. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD£7.99

Electronic - Released July 27, 1992 | Little Idiot

CD£11.99

Electronic - Released May 13, 2002 | Mute, a BMG Company

As MP3s and the constant rise of the DVD bring into question how relevant traditional albums are, Moby digitizes his loose ends and uses new formats to provide more than anyone can possibly ingest in one sitting. The CD in this set features Moby's leftovers from the 18 album, and they are pretty much what you would expect with the quality notched up a little. A bit less polished than his album tracks, they'll generally remind you of some other Moby tunes, only in demo form. "Soul to Love" sounds just like a more sedate "Go" and "String Electro" sounds like most of Play, only they're both pleasantly naïve and much less ambitious. "Landing" (with guest vocals by Azure Ray) and "Stay" make for moody bookends that sound the most complete and make for just enough of the poptacular Moby to hold you over till the next album. But if you've ever had a hankering to spend countless hours in front of the television immersed in the world of Moby, the DVD is the reason to pick up the collection. There's the whole amazing Glastonbury concert, a slew of audio tracks, a hilarious episode of Moby TV with a puppet named Mr. Fish (kind of an obtuse Triumph the Insult Comic Dog), and a whole lot more. Much of the smotheringly charming Moby's content might not sway Eminem, but it's hard not to marvel at a guy who can churn out so much quality material, have such a high profile, and show no sign of being pompous. Bonus DVDs have generally been electronic press kits with a couple of videos, but this one sets a new standard. Couple it with a CD that's so-so and call it a draw. © David Jeffries /TiVo
CD£1.99

Electronic - Released September 3, 2007 | Mute, a BMG Company

CD£11.99

Rock - Released June 14, 2004 | Mute, a BMG Company

CD£7.99

Electronic - Released August 1, 2013 | Mute, a BMG Company

CD£7.99

Electronic - Released March 2, 2018 | Little Idiot

"I feel more activist than musician." Passing 50, Moby has adjusted his priorities, channeling the self-destructive energy of his youth (layed out in his colourful autobiography Porcelain) into multi-militantism - for animal rights and the defense of the environment, and basically against Donald Trump's policies. With this new album, Moby, still as active on social media, is working to portray the confusion in which the Americans live since the last presidential election, and which led them to make such "bad choices". "I want to shout at them, but I want to try to understand and be compassionate," he explained to Billboard. The portrait he draws of this America is - not surprisingly - very morose, as on the apocalyptic beginning Mere Anarchy, which is discouraged from listening with a glass of whiskey and a pistol at hand. What is to follow unfolds the lexical field of depression over trip-hop productions (probably for the melancholy inherent of the sound of Bristol) with The Tired and The Hurt, Welcome to Hard Times, The Sorrow Tree, and ending with A Dark Cloud Is Coming, or the resumption of the spiritual african with Motherless Child (with Raquel Rodriguez), a symbol of the suffering of the slaves. A sadly contemporary album... © Smaël Bouaici / Qobuz

Artist

Moby in the magazine