Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Virgin EMI

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£31.49
CD£22.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£20.99
CD£14.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£20.99
CD£14.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
CD£11.99

Pop - Released November 21, 1994 | WM UK

The Songs of Distant Earth blend together two motifs crafted through Mike Oldfield's atmospheric music. (Both outer space and inner space under water) are the themes of this album, but Oldfield's synthesized artistry comes up short during the course of the 17 tracks, mainly because of the intermittent talking and unnecessary vocabulary that quickly becomes irksome and ineffective. About the music, it is usually Mike Oldfield's differentiation of rhythms or styles on a song to song basis that makes his music thought-provoking and fresh. On this album, the same rhythm lurks through half of the songs, with only smidgens of add-on instrumentation to elevate its flow. Absent is the freewheeling percussion pulses, or the onslaught of strings that so often shower his music. Instead, each track seems flat as his keyboard work comes off gray and bland. Even a few sudden bursts of tempo become short lived, as the pace always falls back to its straight-lined origin. Inspired by Arthur C. Clarke, Oldfield tries to capture the wonder and mystery of the stars and the sea through washes of synthesizer, but his attempt at capturing both themes could have benefited from a multitude of other instruments, as his work usually includes. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
CD£12.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Decca (UMO)

The legendary British composer will always be most identified with his breakthrough long-play composition "Tubular Bells" and the way it was used to illuminate fear in The Exorcist. The happy truth is that since then he's amassed an incredible catalog of over 20 albums featuring just about every instrumental form but jazz: pop, classical, new age, world music, computer game, film soundtrack, etc. The title of his 2008 45-minute classical-influenced opus Music of the Spheres is a reference to the prolific and eclectic composer's feeling that all music should aim to represent the spiritual or otherworldly elements of life -- something beyond the mundane and everyday. He accomplishes that via the sheer hypnotic beauty of the gentler passages and the percussive drama of others, both of which characterize the multi-movement opening track, "Harbinger," which lives up to its title as a preview of the overwhelming, ethereal joys to come. Mike Oldfield is a highly accomplished film composer and it would be easy to imagine gorgeous, sweeping pieces like "Animus" and "Silhouette" behind pastoral romantic scenes, and action-packed, percussively dense expressions like "The Tempest" building some heavy suspense for some nail-biting plot. Completely recorded by an orchestra at Abbey Road studios and featuring Oldfield himself on guitar, Music of the Spheres -- which features guest performances by world-renowned young soprano (and Decca labelmate) Hayley Westenra and classical piano phenom Lang Lang -- is huge in scope yet at heart simple and emotionally direct on a purely melodic level. While the piece was entirely conceived, produced, and written by Oldfield, he turned to popular modern classical composer Karl Jenkins to translate his ideas into traditional classical notations arranged for orchestra -- a great departure from the artist's usual array of studio-only wizardry. Jenkins, who once played oboe on a live BBC recording of "Tubular Bells" in 1975, gets a co-production credit, and with good reason. Oldfield scored his music via a computer program called Logic, while Jenkins used Sibelius to create the musical notation. Oldfield recorded an elaborate demo using orchestral samples, then handed it over so that Jenkins could add the human touch by re-recording it by an orchestra of classical musicians. It's a rich, heartfelt collaboration that breaks new ground for both men. Oldfield had no trouble declaring that he was almost moved to tears while listening to Music of the Spheres come alive at Abbey Road. It's a primitive spiritual and emotional response that every listener would later relate to. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
CD£12.49

Rock - Released February 1, 1973 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Mike Oldfield's groundbreaking album Tubular Bells is arguably the finest conglomeration of off-centered instruments concerted together to form a single, unique piece. A variety of instruments are combined to create an excitable multitude of rhythms, tones, pitches, and harmonies that all fuse neatly into each other, resulting in an astounding plethora of music. Oldfield plays all the instruments himself, including such oddities as the Farfisa organ, the Lowrey organ, and the flageolet. The familiar eerie opening, made famous by its use in The Exorcist, starts the album off slowly, as each instrument acoustically wriggles its way into the current noise that is heard, until there is a grand unison of eccentric sounds that wildly excites the ears. Throughout the album, the tempos range from soft to intense to utterly surprising, making for some excellent musical culminations. Mandolins and Spanish guitars are joined by grinding organs and keyboards, while oddball bells and cranking noises resound in the distance. In the middle of the album, guest Vivian Stanshall announces each instrument seconds before it is heard, ending with the ominous-sounding tubular bells, a truly powerful and dominating instrument. The most interesting and overwhelming aspect of this album is the fact that so many sounds are conjured up, yet none go unnoticed, allowing the listener a gradual submergence into each unique portion of the music. Tubular Bells is a divine excursion into the realm of new age music. © TiVo
CD£13.99

Humour/Spoken Word - Released May 26, 2003 | WM Spain

Mike Oldfield's groundbreaking album Tubular Bells is arguably the finest conglomeration of off-centered instruments concerted together to form a single unique piece. A variety of instruments are combined to create an excitable multitude of rhythms, tones, pitches, and harmonies that all fuse neatly into each other, resulting in an astounding plethora of music. Oldfield plays all the instruments himself, including such oddities as the Farfisa organ, the Lowrey organ, and the flageolet. The familiar eerie opening, made famous by its use in The Exorcist, starts the album off slowly, as each instrument acoustically wriggles its way into the current noise that is heard, until there is a grand unison of eccentric sounds that wildly excites the ears. Throughout the album, the tempos range from soft to intense to utterly surprising, making for some excellent musical culminations. Mandolins and Spanish guitars are joined by grinding organs and keyboards, while oddball bells and cranking noises resound in the distance. In the middle of the album, guest Viv Stanshall announces each instrument seconds before it is heard, ending with the ominous sounding tubular bells, a truly powerful and dominating instrument. The most interesting and overwhelming aspect of this album is the fact that so many sounds are conjured up yet none go unnoticed, allowing the listener a gradual submergence into each unique portion of the music. Tubular Bells is a divine excursion into the realm of new age music. [The 2003 bonus DVD edition included tracks mixed in 5.1 sound, as well as "Introduction 2003: 'The Video'."] © TiVo

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Download not available
Mike Oldfield, the self-taught guitarist, multi-instrumentalist, composer, arranger, and producer, is chiefly remembered for his album-length "Tubular Bells" composition, an eerie, fascinating, and conceptual piece that did so much to set the tone for the movie The Exorcist. Oldfield played most of the instruments himself on "Tubular Bells" and it remains, and undoubtedly always will remain, his signature piece, but he's done a lot more than that, exploring styles and musical forms from progressive rock and folk to jazz, ambient, world, pop, and even disco and beyond throughout his maverick recording career. This two-disc set, selected and sequenced by Oldfield himself, provides a nice survey of his shifts and turns, and illustrates the restless and often brilliant way he produces a sound and style that manages to be expansive and insular, popular and eccentric, and sometimes all of these at once. Excerpts from "Tubular Bells" are here, naturally, along with the African section of "Amarok," "Ommadawn," and shorter pieces like "Ascension," "Supernova," and "The Tempest," and there's even a message in Morse code for Richard Branson woven in here. Now 60, and making his home in the Bahamas, Oldfield continues to do his own thing, combining the avant-garde with classical composition techniques, prog rock dynamics, and his own restless sense of pop music. This self-chosen set makes a great introduction to his life's work, although ardent fans will no doubt have everything here in their longer forms. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
CD£11.99

Pop - Released August 31, 1998 | WM UK

Tubular Bells II is the update and/or sequel to Mike Oldfield's landmark 1973 new age recording Tubular Bells, which will resonate forever as the haunting theme to The Exorcist. Here, Oldfield repeats his multi-instrumental performance, playing guitar, banjo, organ, percussion, mandolin, and the titular tubular bells, although in a nod to modernism, the latter instruments often appear as samples through Oldfield's Kurzweil synth rig. It's the piece's captivating main theme that again takes center stage here. The eight-minute opening track "Sentinel" plays it off of whining guitars and breathy female vocals. The latter element is a nice touch. The genre that the original Bells helped establish has come quite a ways in 20 years, and this fact isn't lost on Oldfield. Throughout II, he incorporates the multi-cultural influences that have cross-pollinated with new age, bringing in breathy ethnic flutes, Asian-inflected string sounds, and the whispered foreign words of "Sentinel." The famous ceiling of the album, where each instrument is introduced by a narrator, becomes another summit between old and new. Alan Rickman handles the introductions (during "Bell") and runs through a litany of instruments that includes "digital sound processor," reed and pipe organ, "the Venetian effect," glockenspiel, "two slightly sampled electric guitars," and vocal chords, which Rickman introduces as if they're an exotic museum piece. Some of Oldfield's fancy-handed riffs fail; the bagpipes of "Tattoo" seem too obvious and "Sunjammer" sounds like an unfortunate outtake from the Who's Tommy. But overall, Tubular Bells II succeeds mightily. It doesn't beat its predecessor, but does update its sonics and technology with Oldfield's flair for studied grandiosity. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
HI-RES£20.99
CD£14.99

Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res
CD£14.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Although it features the beautiful recorder of Leslie Penny and the Chieftains' Paddy Maloney playing the uilean pipe, Ommadawn didn't gain Mike Oldfield the success he was looking for. The album was released in the same year as the David Bedford-arranged Orchestral Tubular Bells and nine months after Oldfield picked up a Grammy award for the original Tubular Bells album. The most pleasing attribute of Ommadawn is its incorporation of both African and Irish music in its symphonic rock & roll mainframe. Boosted by a hearty amount of different horns, piano, cello, trumpet, and synthesizer, the album has its moments of rising action, but the whole of Ommadawn fails to keep its lovely segments around long enough, and there are some rather lengthy instances that include bland runs of unvaried music. Another plus is Oldfield's use of a choir, giving the album a soft, humanistic feel when contrasted against the keyboards or synthesizer. While it does include flashes of Mike Oldfield's brilliance, the entire album may seem a little anticlimactic when compared to some of his other releases. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
CD£11.99

Pop - Released August 31, 1998 | WM UK

Tubular Bells III is a record quite similar to Mike Oldfield's second update of the original classic, recorded just six years prior. The production methods are a bit more polished and the tone is more serious, but the music remains dreamy, somewhat over-evocative "new age with a beat" music, quite similar to Enigma -- thanks to the Eastern textures of vocalist Amar on three tracks. There are a few occasional moments of levity, however, including the raging guitar stormer "Outcast" and a remake of Oldfield's early-'80s hit "Man in the Rain." © John Bush /TiVo
HI-RES£15.49
CD£11.49

Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res
CD£11.99

Pop - Released August 31, 1998 | WM UK

Mike Oldfield has always been a bit of a musical dilettante, and Voyager is no exception. If he didn't come by it honestly, one might almost suspect this album's Celtic influences derived from that music's being in vogue when this disc was recorded. There are certainly some enjoyable melodies herein, but nothing that rises above the ordinary. Oldfield's stinging guitar work is in evidence, and some synthesized bagpipes try to lend it an air of majesty, but ultimately this recording doesn't really voyage much of anywhere. © Ross Boissoneau /TiVo

Artist

Mike Oldfield in the magazine
  • The Qobuz Studio: Episode #5
    The Qobuz Studio: Episode #5 This week featuring albums from David Bowie, Kevin Gates, Mariss Jansons & Wiener Philharmoniker, Pop ETC, John Moreland, and a retrospective on Mike Oldfield.