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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 11, 2021 | Quality Control Music - Motown Records

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Few artists have left as big a mark on the world of trap as Migos. After perfecting their style over ten years and coming to dominate their genre, the three Atlanta natives decided to take a break in order to focus on their respective solo projects. And so, three years later, here is Culture III: a dive into a trap frenzy with tracks like Modern Day or Handle My Business with its rough modern sound. We’re treated to some drill on Light Up, featuring the late Pop Smoke, and trap-soul with Avalanche, which samples Daddy Was A Rollin ' Stone by the Temptations. For their big comeback, Migos have brought in the producers who helped them build their initial success: Murda Beatz, DJ Durel and, most notably, Zaytoven, who we find on the track Roadrunner sticking to his bass gongs and synthesiser sounds. Culture III shines with a multitude of influences drawn from each group-member's solo wanderings, as if they had needed to separate for a while to come back stronger than ever with something fresh and new. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 26, 2018 | Quality Control Music, LLC

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The sequel to Migos' 2017 breakthrough CULTURE is a great album buried beneath expendable extras. Culture II finds Quavo, Offset, and Takeoff embracing their superstardom -- charting the meteoric rise from trap hustling to a lavish lifestyle of glamorous parties and international runways -- with a whopping 24 tracks of mostly serviceable triplet-trap and some undeniable pop hits. Whether this feels overly bloated or supreme value-for-money, however, is up to listeners. Sifting through the merely passable to find those true nuggets is not difficult, as the big moments make themselves immediately known. At the top of the pack is "BBO (Bad Bitches Only)," a horn-drenched throwback produced by Kanye West and featuring an irresistible chorus by 21 Savage. The Pharrell Williams-assisted "Stir Fry" hypnotizes with unmistakable production that echoes Pharrell's work on Snoop Dogg's "Drop It Like It's Hot." The propulsive "Auto Pilot (Huncho on the Beat)" is another highlight on the first half, one of a handful of tracks produced exclusively by executive producers Quavo and Migos' unofficial fourth member, DJ Durel. The pair's strength as producers is apparent throughout Culture II -- sometimes creating more memorable moments than their guests -- especially on "CC" with Gucci Mane, "Crown the Kings," and the slapping "Too Playa" with 2 Chainz. In similar fashion, the trio also prove that they can hold their own without the help of a high-profile guest verse. "Gang Gang" and "Made Men" stand out, eclipsing mostly forgettable turns by Drake ("Walk It Talk It"); Travis Scott, Ty Dolla $ign, and Big Sean ("White Sand"), and Post Malone ("Notice Me"). Most disappointing is the boring "MotorSport," notable for being the first track uniting Nicki Minaj and her spiritual successor Cardi B. While the women remain the stars of the show, it's a moment that should have been greater. These relative disappointments -- a dozen in all, give or take -- would have been fine as a bonus disc or quick mixtape, but, presented alongside much stronger tracks, only accentuate their dullness. Taking a page from the Drake playbook, Culture II runs long and tests the limits of a standard attention span at nearly two hours. With enough highlights to form a single digestible effort, Migos could have delivered another culture-defining classic with just a little trimming. Instead, they've taken what should have been a potent, big league statement and diluted it. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 11, 2021 | Quality Control Music - Motown Records

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Few artists have left as big a mark on the world of trap as Migos. After perfecting their style over ten years and coming to dominate their genre, the three Atlanta natives decided to take a break in order to focus on their respective solo projects. And so, three years later, here is Culture III: a dive into a trap frenzy with tracks like Modern Day or Handle My Business with its rough modern sound. We’re treated to some drill on Light Up, featuring the late Pop Smoke, and trap-soul with Avalanche, which samples Daddy Was A Rollin ' Stone by the Temptations. For their big comeback, Migos have brought in the producers who helped them build their initial success: Murda Beatz, DJ Durel and, most notably, Zaytoven, who we find on the track Roadrunner sticking to his bass gongs and synthesiser sounds. Culture III shines with a multitude of influences drawn from each group-member's solo wanderings, as if they had needed to separate for a while to come back stronger than ever with something fresh and new. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 27, 2017 | Quality Control Music

In a few short years, Atlanta has made itself the epicentre of world rap. In the seedbed of OutKast, Young Jeezy and Gucci Mane, a new generation of rappers and producers in the Georgia state capital have re-written the rules of the genre, given life to original trap music and conquered the charts. Born in the early 1990s, Quavo, Offset and Takeoff, who formed Migos in 2009, cut clownish figures when they started out. Propelled to international stardom almost by accident as a result of an ultra-viral single, Versace, they can now boast of having invented a new style of rapping, what they call their triplet flow, which has been making waves. With this discovery and their propensity for throwing out one anthem after another (the phenomenal Bad And Boujee, with Lil Uzi Vert, which broke all previous records, and the very competent T-Shirt), Migos have made a much-hyped return with their second studio album. Thanks to a five-star cast (Gucci Mane, 2 Chainz, Travis Scott and DJ Khaled are all on hand) and a density that surpasses anything the trio had achieved on their previous mixtapes (or indeed on their 2015 album, Yung Rich Nation), Culture sets itself apart from the vast competition through the inventiveness of the three rappers who constantly conceive vocabularies and twist new slang, and by the audacity of the hippest beatmakers in the American South, who bend over backwards to meet their requirements. A major milestone. © DB/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released September 13, 2019 | MGM Records - Warner Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 11, 2020 | Quality Control Music - Motown Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 14, 2021 | Quality Control Music - Motown Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 3, 2014 | Quality Control Music

Following up their hit "Versace" with this in-your-face mixtape, Atlanta's Migos don't aspire to knock Nas, Kanye West, or Jay-Z off their lofty thrones, but they do deliver a defiant message not to peg them as a one-hit wonders or bandwagon jumpers. Tracks like "Copy Me" declare they were the creators of the club-trap phenomenon of 2013, while other worthy bangers give them every right, then there are a couple disses thrown at those unauthorized remixes, so don't be surprised that Rich Homie Quan, Young Thug, and Jermaine Dupri are the only guests invited on board. All-encompassing party bangers round out the mixtape's theme, while a crowded recording, thumping beats, and background shouts make this identifiably Migos. At 25 tracks, this is a hang session for the dedicated fan and not an easy entry point. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 28, 2016 | 300 Entertainment

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 22, 2020 | Quality Control Music - Motown Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 10, 2021 | Quality Control Music - Motown Records

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Few artists have left as big a mark on the world of trap as Migos. After perfecting their style over ten years and coming to dominate their genre, the three Atlanta natives decided to take a break in order to focus on their respective solo projects. And so, three years later, here is Culture III: a dive into a trap frenzy with tracks like Modern Day or Handle My Business with its rough modern sound. We’re treated to some drill on Light Up, featuring the late Pop Smoke, and trap-soul with Avalanche, which samples Daddy Was A Rollin ' Stone by the Temptations. For their big comeback, Migos have brought in the producers who helped them build their initial success: Murda Beatz, DJ Durel and, most notably, Zaytoven, who we find on the track Roadrunner sticking to his bass gongs and synthesiser sounds. Culture III shines with a multitude of influences drawn from each group-member's solo wanderings, as if they had needed to separate for a while to come back stronger than ever with something fresh and new. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 5, 2020 | Quality Control Music - Motown Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 26, 2018 | Quality Control Music, LLC

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The sequel to Migos' 2017 breakthrough CULTURE is a great album buried beneath expendable extras. Culture II finds Quavo, Offset, and Takeoff embracing their superstardom -- charting the meteoric rise from trap hustling to a lavish lifestyle of glamorous parties and international runways -- with a whopping 24 tracks of mostly serviceable triplet-trap and some undeniable pop hits. Whether this feels overly bloated or supreme value-for-money, however, is up to listeners. Sifting through the merely passable to find those true nuggets is not difficult, as the big moments make themselves immediately known. At the top of the pack is "BBO (Bad Bitches Only)," a horn-drenched throwback produced by Kanye West and featuring an irresistible chorus by 21 Savage. The Pharrell Williams-assisted "Stir Fry" hypnotizes with unmistakable production that echoes Pharrell's work on Snoop Dogg's "Drop It Like It's Hot." The propulsive "Auto Pilot (Huncho on the Beat)" is another highlight on the first half, one of a handful of tracks produced exclusively by executive producers Quavo and Migos' unofficial fourth member, DJ Durel. The pair's strength as producers is apparent throughout Culture II -- sometimes creating more memorable moments than their guests -- especially on "CC" with Gucci Mane, "Crown the Kings," and the slapping "Too Playa" with 2 Chainz. In similar fashion, the trio also prove that they can hold their own without the help of a high-profile guest verse. "Gang Gang" and "Made Men" stand out, eclipsing mostly forgettable turns by Drake ("Walk It Talk It"); Travis Scott, Ty Dolla $ign, and Big Sean ("White Sand"), and Post Malone ("Notice Me"). Most disappointing is the boring "MotorSport," notable for being the first track uniting Nicki Minaj and her spiritual successor Cardi B. While the women remain the stars of the show, it's a moment that should have been greater. These relative disappointments -- a dozen in all, give or take -- would have been fine as a bonus disc or quick mixtape, but, presented alongside much stronger tracks, only accentuate their dullness. Taking a page from the Drake playbook, Culture II runs long and tests the limits of a standard attention span at nearly two hours. With enough highlights to form a single digestible effort, Migos could have delivered another culture-defining classic with just a little trimming. Instead, they've taken what should have been a potent, big league statement and diluted it. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 11, 2021 | Quality Control Music - Motown Records

Few artists have left as big a mark on the world of trap as Migos. After perfecting their style over ten years and coming to dominate their genre, the three Atlanta natives decided to take a break in order to focus on their respective solo projects. And so, three years later, here is Culture III: a dive into a trap frenzy with tracks like Modern Day or Handle My Business with its rough modern sound. We’re treated to some drill on Light Up, featuring the late Pop Smoke, and trap-soul with Avalanche, which samples Daddy Was A Rollin ' Stone by the Temptations. For their big comeback, Migos have brought in the producers who helped them build their initial success: Murda Beatz, DJ Durel and, most notably, Zaytoven, who we find on the track Roadrunner sticking to his bass gongs and synthesiser sounds. Culture III shines with a multitude of influences drawn from each group-member's solo wanderings, as if they had needed to separate for a while to come back stronger than ever with something fresh and new. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 13, 2017 | 300 Entertainment

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 7, 2017 | Atlantic Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 22, 2020 | Quality Control Music - Motown Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released February 14, 2020 | Quality Control Music - Motown Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 26, 2018 | Quality Control Music, LLC

The sequel to Migos' 2017 breakthrough CULTURE is a great album buried beneath expendable extras. Culture II finds Quavo, Offset, and Takeoff embracing their superstardom -- charting the meteoric rise from trap hustling to a lavish lifestyle of glamorous parties and international runways -- with a whopping 24 tracks of mostly serviceable triplet-trap and some undeniable pop hits. Whether this feels overly bloated or supreme value-for-money, however, is up to listeners. Sifting through the merely passable to find those true nuggets is not difficult, as the big moments make themselves immediately known. At the top of the pack is "BBO (Bad Bitches Only)," a horn-drenched throwback produced by Kanye West and featuring an irresistible chorus by 21 Savage. The Pharrell Williams-assisted "Stir Fry" hypnotizes with unmistakable production that echoes Pharrell's work on Snoop Dogg's "Drop It Like It's Hot." The propulsive "Auto Pilot (Huncho on the Beat)" is another highlight on the first half, one of a handful of tracks produced exclusively by executive producers Quavo and Migos' unofficial fourth member, DJ Durel. The pair's strength as producers is apparent throughout Culture II -- sometimes creating more memorable moments than their guests -- especially on "CC" with Gucci Mane, "Crown the Kings," and the slapping "Too Playa" with 2 Chainz. In similar fashion, the trio also prove that they can hold their own without the help of a high-profile guest verse. "Gang Gang" and "Made Men" stand out, eclipsing mostly forgettable turns by Drake ("Walk It Talk It"); Travis Scott, Ty Dolla $ign, and Big Sean ("White Sand"), and Post Malone ("Notice Me"). Most disappointing is the boring "MotorSport," notable for being the first track uniting Nicki Minaj and her spiritual successor Cardi B. While the women remain the stars of the show, it's a moment that should have been greater. These relative disappointments -- a dozen in all, give or take -- would have been fine as a bonus disc or quick mixtape, but, presented alongside much stronger tracks, only accentuate their dullness. Taking a page from the Drake playbook, Culture II runs long and tests the limits of a standard attention span at nearly two hours. With enough highlights to form a single digestible effort, Migos could have delivered another culture-defining classic with just a little trimming. Instead, they've taken what should have been a potent, big league statement and diluted it. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 10, 2021 | Quality Control Music - Motown Records

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