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Crooners - Released April 15, 2013 | Reprise

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Christmas Music - Released October 28, 2016 | 143 - Reprise

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Pop - Released November 16, 2018 | Reprise

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On the surface, the title of Michael Bublé's tenth studio album, 2018's Love, announces a swinging collection of standards and originals all thematically centered on themes of romance, fidelity, and desire. That said, it could also speak to two heart-wrenching years leading up to Love, during which time the singer's then three-year-old son was diagnosed with liver cancer and underwent chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Prior to the release of Love, Bublé even intimated in an interview that, in light of his son's illness, he might be ready to retire. All these notions of love and the stakes that drive our passionate emotions are redolent on the album, whose brightly swinging and upbeat production via longtime mentor David Foster belies the personal turmoil of Bublé's private life. Which isn't to say that Love is a sad album. These are lush arrangements (split between big band, small group, and orchestra) via Foster and pianist Alan Broadbent that showcase Bublé's warm vocals. Much of it evokes the classic '40s and '50s pop Bublé so clearly admires. His supple voice is backed throughout by his snappy ensemble, featuring pros like Weather Report drummer Peter Erskine, noted Diana Krall bassist Ben Wolfe, longtime Bublé associate pianist Alang Chang, and others. There are also two gorgeous duets, including a charming take on "La Vie en Rose" with acclaimed vocalist Cécile McLorin Salvant and a heartfelt rendition of "Help Me Make It Through the Night" with Loren Allred. As with past albums, there are also nods to contemporary pop music, represented here by the catchy, boy band-esque Charlie Puth co-write "Love You Anymore." Similarly, Bublé draws upon his experience as a parent with the heartfelt adult contemporary ballad "Forever Now," in which he sings "You know as well as anybody how tough this life can be/But you've got so much strength inside you/A strength I pray you'll never need." Primarily, Love builds upon Bublé's own strengths, as he dives into the Louis Prima-style jump blues of "Such a Night," evokes Frank Sinatra's of-the-cuff élan with the Deluxe Edition bonus track "I Get a Kick Out of You," and even manages to sidestep comparisons to Nat King Cole as he conjures his own brand of vocal magic on "Unforgettable." In many ways, Love is the epitome of the kind of traditional big-band pop album that Bublé has been honing for over a decade. The difference here is that the heart of the album lies not only in his immense vocal skill, but in his moving devotion to his son, his family, and his fans. ~ Matt Collar
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Ambient/New Age - Released October 14, 2011 | 143 - Reprise

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Christmas is vocalist Michael Bublé's first full-length holiday-themed album since his 2003 EP Let It Snow. As with that album, Christmas features Bublé backed by small ensembles as well as his big band and orchestra, and includes a handful of classic Christmas songs. In that sense, the album is a rather old-school affair, with Bublé in prime Bing Crosby-meets-Dean Martin vocal style tackling such chestnuts as "It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas," "Silent Night," and "I'll Be Home for Christmas." There are also some fine, contemporary, if still retro-sounding, pop moments here including Bublé's duet with the British female pop trio the Puppini Sisters on "Jingle Bells," and his inspired, slightly melancholy reworking of Mariah Carey's "All I Want for Christmas Is You." Ultimately, Christmas is a warm and inviting album that showcases Bublé's impeccable vocal chops. ~ Matt Collar
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Ambient/New Age - Released November 1, 2019 | Reprise

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Film Soundtracks - Released March 21, 2019 | Reprise

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Pop - Released February 6, 2014 | 143 - Reprise

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Although it took more than a year of concerts and promotional appearances, Michael Bublé's 2003 debut disc of swinging pop standards finally ascended the Billboard album chart and landed at number 47. That peak may not seem impressive at first, but in a musical world dominated by rap or the latest flavor of alternative rock, Bublé's upper chart appearance was a real accomplishment and it sparked a renewed interest in music associated with great vocalists like Frank Sinatra. With his second studio disc, It's Time, Bublé builds upon the musical foundation he laid with his debut and demonstrates that he is much more than a flavor-of-the-month celebrity. Like his debut, It's Time mines the rich history of pop music as Bublé applies his own technique to classic standards and incorporates his Rat Pack sound into modern pop songs. Other pop vocal giants have made attempts to reinterpret the pop songs of their day with appalling results (Mel Tormé's version of "Sunshine Superman" comes to mind), but Bublé has the knack for selecting the right songs that he can properly transform into edible works that avoid a cheesy aftertaste. Having a standard like "A Foggy Day (In London Town)" share space with the Beatles' "Can't Buy Me Love" may seem like a lounge lizard joke waiting to happen, but the arrangements (most courtesy of producer David Foster) and performances are seamless. Therefore, the quiet groove of "I've Got You Under My Skin" can sit comfortable next to Bublé's smoky version of Leon Russell's "Song for You," featuring Chris Botti on trumpet. Perhaps it is due to this formula working so well that Bublé has incorporated more of his unique takes on modern pop than on his debut. He even ventures into R&B territory with older hits like "Try a Little Tenderness" and "How Sweet It Is," all the while giving these songs a retro freshness that breathes new life into these gems. Pop starlet Nelly Furtado sounds lovely and elegant in the duet "Quando, Quando, Quando," while Bublé ends the disc with a beautiful reading of Stevie Wonder's "You and I." Another positive step forward is the inclusion of the lovely original tune "Home," a somewhat autobiographical "too long on the road" song co-written by Bublé. The success of this ballad provides yet another direction that he can explore and expand upon. Throughout the disc Bublé emits the feeling that he loves these songs and truly enjoys what he is doing. He sounds pure of voice and pure of heart. Those are rare commodities in the recorded world and they, along with Bublé's talent and vision, help to make It's Time a wonderful listening experience. ~ Aaron Latham
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Pop - Released October 28, 2016 | 143 - Reprise

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Pop - Released August 6, 2013 | 143 - Reprise

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Unlike most young guys who gravitate towards the latest rock or rap trend, Michael Bublé chose to study the classic works of pop vocal masters like Ella Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra while slowly developing his own technique and career as a vocal interpreter. Thanks to producer David Foster, the 25-year-old Bublé has graduated to the big time with a self-titled debut disc that shows off his knowledge and appreciation for a style of music that is mostly unfamiliar to his generation. Swinging his way through a set of pop standards both classic ("The Way You Look Tonight"), and more recent ("Moondance"), Bublé already possesses a quality that reaches beyond his youthfulness, with a voice that incorporates his influences into a sound that is fresh yet familiar. When he launches into a standard like "Come Fly With Me," images of Sinatra are conjured up; but as the song progresses, the listener realizes that this is not Sinatra, or Bobby Darin, or any other famous vocalist. It is someone who has learned the art of popular song and is creating his own colorful music from shades of the past. In doing so, Bublé throws a fresh coat of paint on an old standard like "Fever," and gives it a satiny sheen that the song hasn't seen in years. In addition to revitalizing the classics, he draws in a younger audience by covering more recent, rock-era songs in a swinging gloss. Songs like George Michael's "Kissing a Fool" or Queen's "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" are jazzed up even further than their retro-based originals, and flow easily alongside the standards. The only interruption comes when Barry Gibb guests on his own "How Can You Mend a Broken Heart," with a reverb-laced vibrato that simply does not fit in this musical environment. Throughout the disc it is apparent that Bublé has done his homework and aced the test, but there is always room for improvement. Sinatra haunts his vocals a bit too much on songs like "Summer Wind," and there are moments throughout the disc when he forces his technique instead of following a natural cadence, but these minor criticisms will improve with time; and nothing can really diminish the sheer pleasure and joy he expresses in each performance. He sounds absolutely thrilled to be singing these songs, and that goes a long way in making Michael Bublé an exciting debut. ~ Aaron Latham
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Pop - Released February 11, 2003 | 143 - Reprise

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Pop - Released October 21, 2016 | Reprise

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Pop - Released August 6, 2013 | 143 - Reprise

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Pop - Released June 12, 2009 | 143 - Reprise

Michael Bublé Meets Madison Square Garden finds Canadian crooner Bublé making a highly anticipated appearance at the storied New York City concert venue. Often seen as a symbolic moment for a performer having achieved a high level of populist success, Madison Square Garden performances have led to a few well-known live albums, including one from Bublé's own most notable influence, Frank Sinatra. Interestingly, while Sinatra's 1974 album The Main Event came toward the latter half of his career, Bublé's appeared right as some critics and even his contemporaries like smooth jazz trumpeter Chris Botti were proclaiming his ascension to Sinatra's throne as the best traditional pop vocalist of his generation. Setting such grandiose summations aside, Bublé is at the very least an incredibly talented vocalist who grew from a nice kid singer in the early part of the decade to a truly swinging interpreter of the Great American Songbook canon by the end of the decade. Furthermore, Bublé found the right modern pop/soul songs -- often co-written by himself ("Lost," "Home") -- which has worked to fully contemporize his likable and swaggering stage persona, all of which is readily apparent on Meets Madison Square Garden. Backed here by his de rigueur big band, Bublé has a joyful and abundantly devilish rapport with the audience and is clearly as in love with them as they are with him. Not surprisingly, there was some buzz surrounding Bublé's Madison Square Garden concert, which marked not only his first appearance at the Garden, but also his return visit to the famous Blue Note jazz club where he made his original N.Y.C. debut. Included with the CD of Michael Bublé Meets Madison Square Garden is a DVD documentary detailing this return visit as well as the behind-the-scenes buildup and performance of his Madison Square Garden concert. ~ Matt Collar
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Pop - Released November 16, 2018 | Reprise

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On the surface, the title of Michael Bublé's tenth studio album, 2018's Love, announces a swinging collection of standards and originals all thematically centered on themes of romance, fidelity, and desire. That said, it could also speak to two heart-wrenching years leading up to Love, during which time the singer's then three-year-old son was diagnosed with liver cancer and underwent chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Prior to the release of Love, Bublé even intimated in an interview that, in light of his son's illness, he might be ready to retire. All these notions of love and the stakes that drive our passionate emotions are redolent on the album, whose brightly swinging and upbeat production via longtime mentor David Foster belies the personal turmoil of Bublé's private life. Which isn't to say that Love is a sad album. These are lush arrangements (split between big band, small group, and orchestra) via Foster and pianist Alan Broadbent that showcase Bublé's warm vocals. Much of it evokes the classic '40s and '50s pop Bublé so clearly admires. His supple voice is backed throughout by his snappy ensemble, featuring pros like Weather Report drummer Peter Erskine, noted Diana Krall bassist Ben Wolfe, longtime Bublé associate pianist Alang Chang, and others. There are also two gorgeous duets, including a charming take on "La Vie en Rose" with acclaimed vocalist Cécile McLorin Salvant and a heartfelt rendition of "Help Me Make It Through the Night" with Loren Allred. As with past albums, there are also nods to contemporary pop music, represented here by the catchy, boy band-esque Charlie Puth co-write "Love You Anymore." Similarly, Bublé draws upon his experience as a parent with the heartfelt adult contemporary ballad "Forever Now," in which he sings "You know as well as anybody how tough this life can be/But you've got so much strength inside you/A strength I pray you'll never need." Primarily, Love builds upon Bublé's own strengths, as he dives into the Louis Prima-style jump blues of "Such a Night," evokes Frank Sinatra's of-the-cuff élan with the Deluxe Edition bonus track "I Get a Kick Out of You," and even manages to sidestep comparisons to Nat King Cole as he conjures his own brand of vocal magic on "Unforgettable." In many ways, Love is the epitome of the kind of traditional big-band pop album that Bublé has been honing for over a decade. The difference here is that the heart of the album lies not only in his immense vocal skill, but in his moving devotion to his son, his family, and his fans. ~ Matt Collar
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Pop - Released October 6, 2009 | 143 - Reprise

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Pop - Released February 8, 2005 | 143 - Reprise

Although it took more than a year of concerts and promotional appearances, Michael Bublé's 2003 debut disc of swinging pop standards finally ascended the Billboard album chart and landed at number 47. That peak may not seem impressive at first, but in a musical world dominated by rap or the latest flavor of alternative rock, Bublé's upper chart appearance was a real accomplishment and it sparked a renewed interest in music associated with great vocalists like Frank Sinatra. With his second studio disc, It's Time, Bublé builds upon the musical foundation he laid with his debut and demonstrates that he is much more than a flavor-of-the-month celebrity. Like his debut, It's Time mines the rich history of pop music as Bublé applies his own technique to classic standards and incorporates his Rat Pack sound into modern pop songs. Other pop vocal giants have made attempts to reinterpret the pop songs of their day with appalling results (Mel Tormé's version of "Sunshine Superman" comes to mind), but Bublé has the knack for selecting the right songs that he can properly transform into edible works that avoid a cheesy aftertaste. Having a standard like "A Foggy Day (In London Town)" share space with the Beatles' "Can't Buy Me Love" may seem like a lounge lizard joke waiting to happen, but the arrangements (most courtesy of producer David Foster) and performances are seamless. Therefore, the quiet groove of "I've Got You Under My Skin" can sit comfortable next to Bublé's smoky version of Leon Russell's "Song for You," featuring Chris Botti on trumpet. Perhaps it is due to this formula working so well that Bublé has incorporated more of his unique takes on modern pop than on his debut. He even ventures into R&B territory with older hits like "Try a Little Tenderness" and "How Sweet It Is," all the while giving these songs a retro freshness that breathes new life into these gems. Pop starlet Nelly Furtado sounds lovely and elegant in the duet "Quando, Quando, Quando," while Bublé ends the disc with a beautiful reading of Stevie Wonder's "You and I." Another positive step forward is the inclusion of the lovely original tune "Home," a somewhat autobiographical "too long on the road" song co-written by Bublé. The success of this ballad provides yet another direction that he can explore and expand upon. Throughout the disc Bublé emits the feeling that he loves these songs and truly enjoys what he is doing. He sounds pure of voice and pure of heart. Those are rare commodities in the recorded world and they, along with Bublé's talent and vision, help to make It's Time a wonderful listening experience. ~ Aaron Latham
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Ambient/New Age - Released October 14, 2011 | 143 - Reprise

Christmas is vocalist Michael Bublé's first full-length holiday-themed album since his 2003 EP Let It Snow. As with that album, Christmas features Bublé backed by small ensembles as well as his big band and orchestra, and includes a handful of classic Christmas songs. In that sense, the album is a rather old-school affair, with Bublé in prime Bing Crosby-meets-Dean Martin vocal style tackling such chestnuts as "It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas," "Silent Night," and "I'll Be Home for Christmas." There are also some fine, contemporary, if still retro-sounding, pop moments here including Bublé's duet with the British female pop trio the Puppini Sisters on "Jingle Bells," and his inspired, slightly melancholy reworking of Mariah Carey's "All I Want for Christmas Is You." Ultimately, Christmas is a warm and inviting album that showcases Bublé's impeccable vocal chops. ~ Matt Collar

Pop - Released March 18, 2013 | 143 - Reprise

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Pop - Released November 15, 2005 | Reprise

Featured as a PBS "Great Performances," Caught in the Act finds modern-day crooner Michael Bublé performing live at the Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles. Bublé has a warm, naturally pure voice perfectly suited to the swinging standards and heartfelt contemporary ballads he's made his name with since his debut in 2003. It doesn't hurt either that here he is backed by a full big band including a string section. Bublé's between-song banter is also charming and adds to the loose and fun feel of the album. Included are such classic songs as "Summer Wind" and "The More I See You," as well as the hit "Home." Also featured here is a full DVD of the rest of the live show as well as some other bonus material. ~ Matt Collar
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Pop - Released April 27, 2007 | 143 - Reprise

More than any of his contemporaries, vocalist Michael Bublé has bridged the gap between standards-oriented vocal pop and more contemporary pop vocals. Having perfected the mix on his superb 2003 effort, It's Time, which found the Frank Sinatra-influenced singer covering both "I've Got You Under My Skin" and Leon Russell's R&B ballad "A Song for You," Bublé wisely doesn't mess with a good thing on 2007's Call Me Irresponsible. Once again delving into a mix of swinging big-band numbers and classic pop hits such as the wickedly hip '60s standard "Comin' Home Baby" (featuring backing vocals from Boyz II Men), the album is a breezy, stylish good time. And while such cuts as "The Best Is Yet to Come" and the laid-back title track comfortably cast Bublé as a modern-day crooner consistent with his billing, the unexpected reworkings of contemporary pop songs often make the biggest impact. To these ends, his bossa nova duet with vocalist Ivan Lins on Eric Clapton's "Wonderful Tonight" and the reharmonized Willie Nelson perennial "Always on My Mind" work particularly well here, not as cheeky cabaret but as artfully crafted and devastatingly moving ballads. And it's not just the cover tunes that drive the album; on the contrary, much like the Bublé co-written ballad "Home" defined the mood of It's Time, his sparkling melodic pop original "Everything" helps make Call Me Irresponsible a truly welcome pop album by any standard. This CD was nominated for a Grammy award in 2007 as Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album, and "Everything" was nominated for Best Male Pop Performance. ~ Matt Collar