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£16.99

Concertos - Released November 10, 2014 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released May 13, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica
Most of these recordings were made in 1960, when the pianist Martha Argerich was just 18; there is a fearsomely proficient Prokofiev Piano Sonata No. 7 in B flat major, Op. 83, from seven years later, after Argerich had won the Chopin Piano Competition and was on her way to stardom. The recordings are taken from radio broadcasts that are quite good sonically by 1960 standards, and they give abundant evidence of why those in the know spotted the young Argentine and began to give her bigger opportunities. Sample the opening movement of the Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 7 in D minor, Op. 10, No. 3 (CD 1, track 4). Argerich imparts a kind of restless push to this slow introduction that fits it very well. In general she takes fast tempos, but exerts iron control over the music, and in the outer movements of the late Piano Sonata in D major, K. 576, of Mozart, this is very effective indeed. The second disc of the CD set is devoted to show pieces by Prokofiev and Ravel, and the duality of intellectual music done with flair and bravura and virtuoso works done with a probing attention to structure has sustained Argerich throughout her career. Highly recommended for Argerich fans, and really for anybody.
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Classical - Released May 13, 2013 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Record of the Month - Gramophone Editor's Choice
Martha Argerich and Friends is drawn from recitals given during the first three years of the Martha Argerich Project Lugano Festival. Chamber music and mentoring young musicians have been two constants in Argerich's career, and the two are the reasons behind the project. The festival gives more experienced or well-known performers and those who are less so a chance to work together and learn from each other, covering a wider variety of chamber music than most festivals. So on these three discs there's everything from piano duos to violin sonatas to a piano quintet, and Argerich herself isn't always the pianist. The discs begin with a transcription of Prokofiev's "Classical" Symphony for piano duo performed by Argerich and Yefim Bronfman. Bronfman and Emanuel Ax have made some problematic recordings in the past, and compared to those, his musicality and expert ensemble work with Argerich are surprising and thoroughly enjoyable. Most of what is here is expertly done and quite pleasing. The first disc continues with the infectious liveliness of the Nutcracker Suite and the incredible sense of connectivity between the instruments' parts in the Shostakovich Piano Trio No. 2. Maxim Vengerov and Lilya Zilberstein give the Brahms' Violin Sonata No. 3 a rich sound and allow its drama to come out naturally without overstating it. The recording of this and the Schubert Piano Trio No. 1 -- Bronfman, Renaud Capuçon, and Gautier Capuçon -- is very close and intimate, adding to the warmth of the music. The sound for the Schumann quintet is a little farther back, to accommodate the number of performers, but what makes this work stand out from the others is the speed and almost wild spirit of the performance. Violinist Dora Schwarzberg seems to be the most driven of the ensemble (although Argerich leads off the Scherzo pretty speedily), sometimes coming dangerously close to losing control of her bow. It's some frenzied music-making from the group. The Schumann Violin Sonata No. 1, with Argerich and Géza Hosszu-Legocky, is as passionate as the Brahms is intimate. The quality of the performances here is a testament to the devotion these musicians have to chamber music, which is beyond that of many solo artists.
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Classical - Released January 1, 1995 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released February 28, 2011 | Warner Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Concertos - Released September 1, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
The previous batch from the 2015 Lugano Festival was especially rich, with many of the chosen moments being particularly thrilling (Brahms’ Trio, Poulenc’s Sonata for two pianos). The 2016 Festival would in turn see one great event: the tremendous Martha agreed to play on stage, for the first time in more than thirty years, Ravel’s Gaspard de la nuit. She was worried at the thought of measuring herself against her own success from forty years ago—she recorded in 1974 for Deutsche Grammophon a Ravel LP featuring Gaspard, Sonatine and Valses nobles et sentimentales, which is still in everyone’s memory despite its disappointing sound recording. On the spot, it’s obviously all the magic from a sound completely revealing itself, and the permanence of a vision. The truly haunted tone of Le Gibet leaves a lasting impression, Scarbo’s goblin literally shatters when Ondine, completely radiant, screams her recollections of Liszt and remembers just as much Une barque sur l’océan written a few years before. The rest of the testimonies from this 2016 Lugano Festival is as varied as usual. We’ll start with the rarity among the musical repertoire that is Busoni’s Violin Concerto, in D major (like the ones from Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky), also being the opus 35 (like the ones from Tchaikovsky, Korngold), under Renaud Capuçon’s determined bow. As for the two pianos, a classic from Argerich’s repertoire, Mozart Sonata for Two Pianos K. 488 that she’s enjoyed playing regularly with her friends for a few years, here with Sergey Babayan. And let’s not forget the very sincere Horn Trio from Brahms, with the trio Capuçon, Angelich & Guerrier (in 2015, a version without horn was unforgettable), or especially Bach’s Sonata by Martha Argerich and Tedi Papavrami, which could make us forget to not have this duo play the five other works written by Bach for the same formation. We cannot ignore the too short moment from the duo Tiempo & Lechner, as thrilling as ever, here in two Falla’s dances. During this 2016 edition, Argerich also played Ravel’s Concerto in G major. Maybe not in its most extraordinary version, but listening to its phrasings, accents, and nuances that are so personal in the Adagio assai this work remains the source of a rare emotion. May this Lugano Festival resuscitate in a few years with the participation of generous sponsors nostalgic of these incredible moments. © PYL
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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2002 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Decca

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released January 1, 1987 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£7.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1983 | Decca

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£15.49

Classical - Released May 21, 2012 | Warner Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Diapason d'or