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Fado - Released May 25, 2018 | Parlophone Portugal

Distinctions Songlines Five-star review
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Fado - Released February 28, 2011 | Parlophone Portugal

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Though she's undoubtedly resigned to nearly eternal comparisons with Amalia Rodrigues, the master of Portugal's fado, Mariza's debut album finds her breaking out of the mold from the beginning. Newcomers to the fado will quickly become familiar with the style from the plaintive crystal of Mariza's voice and her evocative guitar accompaniment, but her delivery occasionally recalls jazz or the blues. Double bassist Ricardo Cruz and pianist Tiago Machado help carry the effervescent "Poetas," while light percussion adds a note of intrigue on the closer, "Barco Negro." ~ John Bush
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Fado - Released October 9, 2015 | Parlophone Portugal

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World - Released April 14, 2014 | WM Spain

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Fado - Released November 29, 2010 | Parlophone Portugal

4 stars out of 5 -- "[S]he's at her pinnacle as a vocalist, with a breathtaking emotional range, from anguished solemnity to joyful tenderness."
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Fado - Released April 25, 2005 | Parlophone Portugal

Transparente is Mariza's "big" album, it seems, the one designed to make her more than just the shining star of the new fado. The music connects the dots between Portugal and Brazil, giving an international quality to it all. Her voice is as crystal clear as ever, and production by Jacques Morelenbaum is wonderfully transparent. Yet there's a sheen to it all that seems intended to rub off any rough edges. You can hear it in the soft strings that cushion "Meu Fado Meu." It just seems to be trying too hard, rather than letting the music unfold. It's apparent, too, in the fact that the songs are all short -- the longest barely passes three-and-a-half minutes. Not that it's not a gorgeous album; it enfolds the ears like silk; Mariza herself has never sounded more seductive, and the cello on "Quando Me Sinto So" is as warm and inviting as a lover's kiss. But unlike her previous work, there seems an air of calculation about all this, the sense of deliberately seeking out a larger audience rather than allowing the music to speak for itself. She'll never sing a bad note, and there's absolutely nothing to fault with this album. The arrangements are understatedly lush, the playing impeccable, everything as close to perfect as it's possible to be. But at heart, it just doesn't feel real. ~ Chris Nickson
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Fado - Released November 6, 2006 | Parlophone Portugal

It was perhaps time for the obligatory live album from fado's big new star, but this was more than a gig, it was a huge concert in Lisbon. Mariza cherry-picks material from her three albums, and there's some fine stuff to choose from on Concerto em Lisboa. Her usual sympathetic group is augmented by strings, but there's never any danger of them swamping the sound; the arrangements on material like "Menino do Barrio Negro" are so subtle and sublime that they color the edges of the piece instead, gently enhancing the mood. Mariza herself shows how well she's developed as a singer, rarely letting her voice carry her away, and showing the control over the crowd that comes with stardom. For all intents and purposes, Concerto is a live greatest-hits disc, but it's none the worse for that. Like most live albums, it seems as if it's the summation of this phase of her career before looking ahead. But she does it not only with style and aplomb, but also a great deal of grace, and with such a winning, aching voice on the soulful music that she's impossible to resist. ~ Chris Nickson
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Fado - Released June 30, 2008 | Parlophone Portugal

Terra feels like an attempt to move Mariza into the musical mainstream. She's already established herself at the forefront of fado, as one of the leading performers of the emotive Portuguese style, and there's no doubt she possesses a wonderful voice. But the addition of several guests, such as Chucho Valdés, Ivan Lins, and Tito Paris (among others) seems to open up the seams between fado and other genres, including Brazilian music and jazz. It does so relatively subtly, and she keeps her base pretty firmly in fado (witness the glorious "Ja Me Deixou"). But the inclusion of a standard like "Smile," which closes the album and has her singing in English, is evidence of the move to broaden her appeal, as is the lushness of the arrangements, much fuller than she's used in the studio in the past. Her duet with Paris on "Beijo de Saudade" is a highlight, and the voices play off each other gloriously, hers pure and clear, his gruff and harsh. Ultimately, the question is whether it all works, and it does, because it doesn't try to do too much, just a small re-positioning, although what the future will bring remains to be seen. ~ Chris Nickson
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Fado - Released October 9, 2015 | Parlophone Portugal

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Fado - Released October 28, 2016 | Parlophone Portugal

Hi-Res Booklet
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World - Released October 21, 2016 | Parlophone Poland

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Fado - Released February 17, 2006 | Parlophone Portugal

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World - Released February 17, 2006 | Parlophone Portugal

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Pop - Released February 22, 2013 | Parlophone Portugal

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Fado - Released April 27, 2018 | Parlophone Portugal

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World - Released February 24, 2014 | Parlophone Portugal

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Fado - Released September 11, 2015 | Parlophone Portugal

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Fado - Released April 27, 2018 | Parlophone Portugal

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World - Released April 29, 2016 | Parlophone Portugal

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Pop - Released February 17, 2006 | Parlophone Portugal

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