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Classical - Released February 2, 2018 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Record of the Month - Le Choix de France Musique - 5 étoiles de Classica
Rachmaninov's The Bells is of vast scope, setting an adaptation of a poem by Edgar Allan Poe (free enough that the Russian text is generally retranslated into English, as in the graphics here) depicting bells that mark the entire life cycle of an individual. The composer sometimes referred to it as his third symphony, and indeed it has that kind of synoptic ambition. It is written for a large orchestra, a choir, and three soloists, and all the legs of this triad are superbly realized here. Sample the third movement, which represents the tumult and misery of everyday life: conductor Mariss Jansons, leading the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, shows why the group is one of the absolute best in the world in this kind of large-ensemble repertory. It's gripping. The choir has a solidly consistent rich Germanic sound that contrasts nicely with the styles of the three soloists, all Russian. Everything falls into place here, and while there are fine Russian versions of the work, the electricity of the live performance here, very nicely recorded by Bavarian Radio's own engineers, puts this version in a class by itself. The late Symphonic Dances, Rachmaninov's final work, has a different and somewhat nostalgic tone; it was the composer's only work written entirely in the U.S. Its prominent saxophone part is especially evocative here. A top-notch Rachmaninov release all around. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released January 8, 2016 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica
It is the third time that Latvian conductor Mariss Jansons is invited to direct the prestigious New Year's Concert with the Vienna Philharmonic, having previously done so in both 2006 and 2012. This concert, broadcast direct across the planet to about 90 million viewers, will certainly honour the Strauss dynasty: Johann father, Johann son, Josef and Eduard, but also the composer of operettas and film scores Robert Stolz (1880 - 1975), Carl Ziehrer, Emil Waldteufel and Josef Hellmesberger. The majority of waltzes and polkas by Strauss from a big part of the habitual content for the New Year's Concert supply, but eight works are really offered first. They will end unquestionably with Vienna's least kept secret, The Blue Danube Waltz and The Radetzky March. It is worth noting that this will mark the 75th anniversary of the birth of the New Years Concert in Vienna. © SM/Qobuz
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Symphonic Music - Released January 2, 2012 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
This two-CD album of favorites by a number of Strausses (Johann I, Johann II, Josef, and Eduard) and other European composers performed by the Vienna Philharmonic under the direction of Mariss Jansons is enjoyable, but not extraordinary or inspired. The album begins with a medley of well-known pieces in "Vaterländischer Marsch," and it reveals another flaw: the sound is flattened without much reverb or ring. This is of course unrelated to the high quality of the musicians, but the recorded sound contributes to the somewhat lackluster character of the album. This is a live concert recording and the orchestra improves as the concert progresses, as the players get more into the material. Highlights on the first CD include the Tritsch-Tratsch Polka, with the Vienna Boys' Choir, which adds a sweetness to the piece. The fact that the boys' lovely high voices do not ring confirms the problem of the album's sound quality. Other highlights include the bouncing, gliding tenderness of the waltz Wiener Bürger, the high drama and passion of Danse diabolique, and the grace of Delirien. The second CD has more to offer, and as above, the orchestra is more connected to the music, more warmed up. The clever train created by the Copenhagener Eisenbahn-Dampf Galopp is sure to delight as it chugs along, complete with whistles, with perfect orchestral synchronicity. Opera lovers will recognize the famous themes in the Carmen-Quadrille, which is quite an ingenious arrangement of the original work. Another great work that is arranged for the orchestra is the Panorama aus Dornröschen (Panorama from Sleeping Beauty) by Tchaikovsky, and it is a nice contrast to the waltzes and polkas. Certainly no album of Viennese favorites would be complete without An der schönen, blauen Donau (Beautiful Blue Danube), and the orchestra creates smooth legato lines with the right amount of rubato for tension. The audience cannot resist clapping along to Radetzky-Marsch, which is certainly inviting with its sense of fun. In sum, this is a world-class orchestra that has not been given a world-class recording quality, and it is repeating old material. Like many repeated occasions, sometimes they are more trustworthy and familiar than sparkling and exciting. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 3, 2020 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This surprisingly coupled album has been released by BR Klassik since the death of Mariss Jansons in December 2019. In Carmen's Suite, a ballet score for strings, timpani and four percussion groups written to the attention of his wife, the ballerina Maya Plisetskaya (1925-2015), the Russian composer Rodion Shchedrin transcribed excerpts of Bizet’s music, in striving to get away from it. This work incorporates music from Bizet's opera, plus material from the second L'Arlésienne Suite and La jolie fille de Perth. Throughout this rustic and playful work, the colourful, fiery and rhythmic orchestra gives the feeling of having fun at the same time as Jansons shows his science of conducting. In Respighi, contrary to the sense of over-the-top spectacle of Riccardo Muti, Jansons shows greater restraint, not without creating impressive moments, highlighted by a very good sound recording. © Qobuz 
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Ballets - Released November 2, 2018 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Mariss Jansons has been enormously successful in his live recordings of late- and post-Romantic symphonies, and he has made a strong case for 19th century orchestral music in general, though his catalog of performances with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra on BR Klassik shows little representation of modernist works, aside from Britten's War Requiem in 2013 and Stravinsky's Petrushka in 2015. Flash forward to 2018, with this fairly routine pairing of Stravinsky's Le Sacre du printemps and the suite from L'Oiseau de feu, and it might indicate a trend, perhaps because Jansons has nearly exhausted the heavily Germanic repertoire he has championed since the millennium and needs fresh material. His performance of Le Sacre du printemps doesn't rank with the all-time greats because it doesn't offer any revelations or details in the score or original interpretive ideas, but it has sufficient rhythmic energy and instrumental color to be counted as a respectable reading, and would be worth following with a score. The performance of L'Oiseau de feu similarly has everything in place to make it acceptable, though anyone looking for an exciting and innovative interpretation should look elsewhere, because Jansons' offering essentially accords with Stravinsky's 1967 recording of the suite with the Columbia Symphony Orchestra, so it may be regarded as a standard performance with a pedigree. With this release, Jansons may be preparing to pursue a different direction from his customary material, but he needs to explore pieces beyond Stravinsky's great ballets to make his intentions known. © TiVo
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Opera - Released September 4, 2015 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Symphonic Music - Released January 1, 1988 | Chandos

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released November 17, 2009 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released November 4, 2014 | BR-Klassik

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Symphonic Music - Released July 17, 2009 | Sony Music Classical Local

Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released October 26, 2010 | BR-Klassik

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Mariss Jansons and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra recorded Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 5 in E minor and the symphonic fantasy Francesca da Rimini in 2009, and released their vivid live performances in the hybrid SACD format on the German BR-Klassik label. The orchestra plays with a rich sound and polished technique, and the recording offers remarkable clarity of details in the inner voices and exquisite tone colors, so the DSD recording and multichannel sound are put to good use. Yet because the sophisticated audio equipment picks up everything good that happens in the orchestra, it also captures the unattractive sounds of the conductor, which are either grunting or a misguided attempt to hum along with the music. Unfortunately, this is a characteristic shared with too many musicians, so some listeners have learned to tolerate this humming along as a quirk of geniuses. All the same, Jansons' indiscreet noises may be too great a distraction for some listeners and their enjoyment of this album may be diminished over a problem that could have been avoided with a different microphone arrangement. However, if some allowance is made for that problem, the performance of the Symphony No. 5 is powerful and compelling, and Francesca da Rimini has tremendous drama, thanks to the overwhelming force and extreme depth of the orchestra's sound. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 17, 2009 | BR-Klassik

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released October 4, 2019 | BR-Klassik

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Classical - Released April 4, 2014 | Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra

Hi-Res Booklet
In this era of minimally sized ensembles performing Mozart, it's almost refreshing to hear the composer's swan song, the unfinished Requiem in D minor, K. 626, performed by the sizable Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam under conductor Mariss Jansons. The recording is part of a series of live performances of major requiem masses, with those by Brahms and Verdi following this one. Indeed, Jansons' reading of Mozart's mass seems to look forward to the other two; it has a broad Romantic feel and an operatic tinge in the solo parts, ably supported by a quartet of soloists including the mighty contralto Bernarda Fink. Operatic is probably the way to go in Mozart when dealing with a large orchestra, and in general this is a strong example of a rather old-fashioned way of doing Mozart, one that still has plenty of mileage. Sample the opening Introitus and its extremely unusual and very effective pacing quality. The Netherlands Radio Choir's contributions in the explosive Dies Irae and other large sections are outstanding, with power married to contrapuntal precision. The sound from the engineering team associated with the orchestra's in-house label is excellent; there's many a studio recording that can only aspire to this level of clarity and fidelity. This is, in short, an exceptional Mozart Requiem for anyone with any sympathy for what the 19th century brought to the work. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released September 24, 2007 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released September 7, 2009 | Warner Classics

So clean they squeak, and so clear they're almost invisible, these early 90s recordings of Sibelius' First, Second, Third and Fifth Symphonies with Mariss Jansons and the Oslo Philharmonic are no more than tolerable. As was true with the recordings of Tchaikovsky's symphonies by the same artists, these performances may delight listeners who prefer their Romantics dry-eyed and straight-forward. Anyone looking for the First's dark tragedy, the Second's mighty heroism, the Third's unstoppable energy, and the Fifth's overwhelming intensity, though, will not find those qualities here. Jansons' readings are well-controlled and thoroughly thought through, and the Norwegian orchestra's playing is crisp, bright, and colorful. But there is so much more to Sibelius' music, and so many recordings that deliver it, that it is hard to recommend these performances as anything more than alternative points of view, and not particularly interesting alternative points of view, either. EMI's digital sound is transparent but not especially immediate. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1992 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 15, 2003 | Warner Classics

Artist

Mariss Jansons in the magazine
  • The Qobuz Studio: Episode #5
    The Qobuz Studio: Episode #5 This week featuring albums from David Bowie, Kevin Gates, Mariss Jansons & Wiener Philharmoniker, Pop ETC, John Moreland, and a retrospective on Mike Oldfield.