Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD£8.99

Soul - Released December 29, 2016 | Crimson

From
CD£12.49

Pop - Released January 1, 1994 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

In the U.K., Lulu first reached stardom as a gutsy belter of R&B tunes, delivered with a maturity and soulfulness that belied her teenage years. This set includes her two mid-'60s British Top Ten hits, a cover of the Isley Brothers' "Shout" and the mid-tempo pop/soul tune "Leave a Little Love." Elsewhere, you get the spunky "I'll Come Running Over," which features Jimmy Page on guitar, and a raunchy cover of the obscure Rolling Stones song "Surprise Surprise" (also featuring Page). Most intriguing of all is the original version of "Here Comes the Night," later a hit for Them. Lulu performs it as an overwrought, pull-out-the-stops orchestral ballad; it's not nearly as successful as Van Morrison's rendition, but it's worth hearing. Unfortunately, this one doesn't include her surprisingly superb cover of "Heat Wave" from the same era. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Spectrum

From
CD£12.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | EMI

Out of the myriad retrospectives that have appeared throughout the years, Mercury's 2004 The Greatest Hits collection is the first collection to span Scottish singer Marie McDonald McLaughlin Lawrie's entire career. A playful, girl group goddess in the '60s, Lulu came to prominence with the international hit "To Sir with Love" in 1967 (she had regional success with a version of the frat anthem "Shout" in 1964). Similar to contemporaries like Brenda Lee and Dusty Springfield, Lulu's raspy and rowdy singles began to peter out at the end of the decade, but she returned in the '70s with the hit "Oh Me Oh My (I'm a Fool for You Baby)," along with a string of marginally successful albums and collaborations before reinventing herself in the 1990s as a dance-pop diva. The Greatest Hits takes all of Lulu's phases into consideration, so fans who only followed the singer through her '60s heydays would be better off with To Sir with Love! The Complete Mickie Most Recordings, but listeners looking for a more comprehensive picture would do well to tune in to this fine collection of material from one of the U.K.'s most enduring and endearing talents. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
From
CD£11.49

Pop - Released November 16, 2018 | Edsel

Soul - Released May 14, 2021 | Crimson

Download not available
From
CD£8.99

Pop - Released May 26, 2017 | Crimson

From
CD£3.99

Pop - Released November 6, 2019 | Rarity Music

From
CD£11.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | EMI

From
CD£6.49

Pop - Released November 2, 2018 | Edsel

From
CD£11.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2004 | EMI

Can anyone really have expected much of a new album by Lulu in 2004? Forty years after she shot to stardom in England and 37 years after she did the same -- briefly -- in America, she would seem to be part of the fraternity of older English popsters who periodically step into the studio for another go at recording, without too much heavy lifting. So how come she's giving 103-percent or more on Back on Track? And how come the title of this 2004 album is strangely appropriate? The look, as she peers out from the inner fold of the inlay card on the CD, is the same kind she gave us in 1964 -- the synthesized drums are something new, but otherwise, that raspy, bluesy voice competing with the electric lead guitar sound is not at all different from the 17-year-old who carried the Isley Brothers' "Shout" up the U.K. charts and parlayed it into a television and movie career. "Keep Talkin', I'm Listening" is the single and the lead-off track, but Lulu acquits herself well on "Now You Love Me," with its ringing guitar accompaniment, and plunges into harsher territory on "Slow Motion," a hard-rocking track that's a special surprise coming from the 56-year-old pop star. Then she moves into balladry with "Could I Be More Blue" and fills out the music's aching lyricism, and follows it with the even slower, softer, lovelier "All the Love in the World." The rest of the record is hard, loud rock & roll broken up with a pair of guitar-driven ballads, "Roll the Dice" and "Sentimental Heart," and ending on a luscious mid-tempo rocker, "Where the Poor Boys Dance," that could have been a single. There are no notes and the credits are printed ridiculously small, but there are lyrics that are readable, and the music is good enough that any flaws in the packaging are incidental. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2005 | UMOD (Universal Music On Demand)

From
CD£4.99

Pop - Released November 17, 2015 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

From
CD£3.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2015 | Rarity Music

From
CD£13.99

Pop - Released April 13, 2015 | Decca (UMO)

Arriving ten years after Lulu's impressive 2004 comeback Back on Track, 2015's Making Life Rhyme is every bit that record's equal and perhaps it's better in some ways. Working from a set of nearly all-original material for the first time ever -- there are two covers among these 11 songs, including Jimi Hendrix's "Angel" done in the style of Rod Stewart's covers -- Lulu sounds free and inspired by the retro-soul revivals of the past decade. In a sense, the success of Adele and Amy Winehouse has freed Lulu to indulge her love of old-fashioned girl group pop and hopping Tamla-Motown, but there's also a fair amount of bluesy grit here, surfacing even on the buoyant bounce of "Every Single Day." This is evidence of how Lulu doesn't play a strict stylistic revivalist here: she's blurring the lines between R&B and Brill Building, soul and girl group pop, coming up with a vivid, spirited record that ranks among her very best. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD£16.49

Pop - Released April 13, 2015 | Decca (UMO)

Arriving ten years after Lulu's impressive 2004 comeback Back on Track, 2015's Making Life Rhyme is every bit that record's equal and perhaps it's better in some ways. Working from a set of nearly all-original material for the first time ever -- there are two covers among these 11 songs, including Jimi Hendrix's "Angel" done in the style of Rod Stewart's covers -- Lulu sounds free and inspired by the retro-soul revivals of the past decade. In a sense, the success of Adele and Amy Winehouse has freed Lulu to indulge her love of old-fashioned girl group pop and hopping Tamla-Motown, but there's also a fair amount of bluesy grit here, surfacing even on the buoyant bounce of "Every Single Day." This is evidence of how Lulu doesn't play a strict stylistic revivalist here: she's blurring the lines between R&B and Brill Building, soul and girl group pop, coming up with a vivid, spirited record that ranks among her very best. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD£7.99

Soul - Released February 1, 2010 | Dome Records Ltd

From
CD£0.99

Pop - Released April 24, 2014 | Treasury Collection

From
CD£7.99

Soul - Released April 5, 2012 | Dome Records Ltd

From
CD£1.79

Disco - Released May 27, 2020 | How Do You Are?