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Classical - Released March 15, 2019 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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After Elements in 2016, Ludovico Einaudi is continuing his exploration of nature with Seven Days Walking, the first opus in a collection of seven albums to be published throughout 2019. His long walks in the Piedmont mountains during the winter of 2017 were the inspiration for these melancholic and hypnotic melodies. The repetitive nature of walking the same routes again and again in this region which he knows like the back of his hand is reflected musically in his most minimalist composition to date. The harshness and chill of the landscape is translated by the stripped-back orchestration (his piano, a violin and a cello), as well as an understated style (especially in A Sense of Simmetry). The serious tone of the music also highlights Einaudi’s activism in favour of the conservation of nature in the face of environmental degradation. In 2016, he shot a video clip on a floating platform in the Arctic Ocean to support Greenpeace’s Save the Arctic campaign. Recorded in Germany at the end of 2018, Seven Days Walking goes from a delicate and carefree softness (Low Mist, Golden Butterflies) to overwhelming bouts of tension, intensified by masterful crescendos (Gravity, as well as the impressive The Path of the Fossils). Both haunting and elegant, this album once again showcases Einaudi’s talent for musical alchemy as this contemplative journey is a perfect blend of simple, entrancing popular tunes and an orchestral labyrinth more complex than it seems. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 16, 2015 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

One of those composers whose name you might not be instantly familiar with, but whose music you certainly will be, Italian pianist Ludovico Einaudi has been captivating audiences for the best part of two decades with his beautifully delicate and minimal arrangements, many of which have gone on to become soundtrack staples for everything from costume dramas to TV adverts to Hollywood films. Celebrating his increasingly popular output, Islands: Essential Einaudi compiles the Milan Conservatory graduate's most recognizable pieces, with material from his first solo piano record, Le Onde ("Questa Notte"), right up to 2009's synth-based Nightbook (the gothic cello-led title track), alongside a brand new composition, "The Earth Prelude." There are also two of his contributions to the small screen, "Fairytale," whose simple melodies reflect the elegance of the 2002 Keira Knightley ITV adaptation of Doctor Zhivago it appeared in, and the suitably haunting "Berlin Song," which soundtracked Shane Meadows' unflinching kitchen sink drama, This Is England '86. The bombastic symphonies of "Primavera" and the warm subtle strings of the ubiquitous "Divenire," both collaborations with the Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, show Einaudi is just as capable of producing a more expansive sound, but his trademark, ambient ivory-tinkling is much more powerful when it's left to its own devices, as on the lilting "Passagio," the gorgeously melancholic "Dietro Casa," and the effortlessly soothing "I Giorni," the title track from his 2001 breakthrough which recently and belatedly entered the U.K. Top 40 following Radio1 DJ Greg James' championing it as the ultimate therapeutic track to unwind to. Einaudi's signature sound may be a little too sedate for those who like their neo-classical music a little more rousing, but Islands' ability to stir up emotions with just a few chords shows that his works are far from easy listening fodder. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

Italian pianist Ludovico Einaudi writes and performs original compositions that are difficult to classify. He has been grouped with the minimalists, but has rejected that label, and in fact the experience of hearing his music is quite different from that of listening to Philip Glass. Einaudi (who sometimes goes by that single name, but not here) has been extraordinarily popular in Europe, and his CDs have been finding U.S. distribution as well; Una Mattina (One Morning), originally released in 2004, is a good introduction to his style. With the minimalists it shares an extreme economy of language, but that economy is applied to pop gestures rather than to basic musical materials. It's as if Glass or Reich had set out to make a minimalist-pop album -- and then decided to shop it to one of the new age labels: the mood is consistently and almost unchangingly meditative. But there is none of the virtuoso improvisation of pianists like George Winston; the musical language is kept tightly reined in, so that a small shift in harmony, say, takes on the weight of a major musical event. Sample Resta con me (Stay with Me), track 3, to get the flavor of the whole; it seems as though it's going to evolve into a pop piano instrumental, but it doesn't quite. All the music is for Einaudi's own piano, played solo, except that there are some very subtle touches of cello, approaching full partnership in track 9, Dna. Nothing takes this out of the realm of what used to be called mood music, which means that most listeners will know whether they're going to like it or not. But it isn't copying anybody else.
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Classical - Released October 14, 2013 | Ponderosa Music & Art

Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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Classical - Released October 7, 2013 | Ponderosa Music & Art

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Classical - Released October 14, 2013 | Ponderosa Music & Art

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New Age - Released September 5, 2008 | Ponderosa Music & Art Srl

Ludovico Einaudi is a minimalist Italian composer, often associated with film, who has enlivened his style with electronic effects drawn from the worlds of techno and ambient music. He sometimes goes by his last name alone. The combination has proven commercially potent in Europe, and given the attraction of Steve Reich and the other minimalists among aficionados of electronic music on the pop side, it's surprising more musicians haven't explored the combination. Live in Berlin mostly draws on Einaudi's album Divenire, which is scored for piano and orchestra. Apparently little known even to Einaudi's fans, it shows that this composer's studio-oriented sound can be effectively transferred to a live setting. The music, with its waves of arpeggiated piano chords, evoke the new age sound of the 1980s, but strike an intriguing balance between that softer aesthetic and the sparser structures of early minimalism. The electronics push the balance farther in the latter direction, serving as solid joints and substructure to the music. They lose little in live performance, in superior live recording aided by the surroundings of Berlin's venerable Philharmonie, home to the Berlin Philharmonic (it's on Herbert von Karajan Street). Live recordings of minimalist (and new age) music have historically not gotten much attention; these genres seem to favor the closed, meditative loop between studio and listener. This one, however, is unusually well done.
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Classical - Released October 16, 2015 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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World - Released May 5, 2015 | Ponderosa Music & Art

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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

It had to happen -- given the impressive commercial performance of minimalist music in classical-unfriendly America, some European artist was sure to try to capitalize on the trend and bring minimalism to the middle-of-the-road European market. Enter Ludovico Einaudi: composer, pianist, and favorite of the programmers at Britain's crossover radio phenomenon, Classic FM. Divenire presents a selection of his works, some for solo piano and others backed by the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. They're artfully done, stepping up to the line of pure schlock but not crossing over, and using the simplicity of minimalist patterns to rope audiences into something that's actually slightly different. A typical Ludovico (he tends to use just the first name) musical period involves a repetitive pattern with simple harmonies that Philip Glass would have been happy enough with in its original form. But Ludovico almost immediately amplifies it, bringing in easy harmonic motion, building an uncomplicated kind of intensity, layering on the strings if they're present -- and promising a big, cinematic emotional payoff. But the payoff never comes -- the music just keeps going, and the listener is left to coast along on what is apparently for many listeners an emotional high. There are 12 selections on the album, each of moderate length and each moderate in every other way. It may be that this musical antidepressant will succeed just as brilliantly in other countries as it has in Britain (and presumably Italy), for it doesn't quite resemble anything anyone else has come up with. But to claim that it has anything important to say would be a stretch.
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New Age - Released October 7, 2013 | Ponderosa Music & Art

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Classical - Released November 11, 2016 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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New Age - Released March 14, 2008 | Ponderosa Music & Art Srl

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Classical - Released October 16, 2015 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)