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Blues - Released June 16, 2014 | Jazz Village

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Lucky Peterson's father was blues guitarist and singer James Peterson, a well-known regional musician who also owned the Governor's Inn, a premier blues nightclub in Buffalo, New York, which means Peterson grew up around his father's friends, who just happened to be touring and recording musicians like Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters, and Bill Doggett, and he learned from all of them. He became fascinated with the Hammond B-3 organ as a young child, and by the time he was five, he'd proved to be a prodigy on it. Mentored by another of his father's friends, the great songwriter, bassist, arranger, and producer Willie Dixon, Peterson was still only five when he scored an R&B hit with the Dixon-produced "1-2-3-4," the novelty of it all landing him appearances on The Tonight Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, and others, and his debut album appeared in 1969. But Peterson had an exploratory nature, and while he could have had quite a career as a keyboard player, he picked up the guitar at the age of eight, and by the time he was a teen, he had developed an emotionally searing guitar style. He could have relaunched his career then, but instead he attended the Buffalo Academy of Performing Arts, and went out on the road as part of the touring bands of Etta James and Otis Rush, spent three years as Little Milton's keyboardist, another three years in Bobby "Blue" Bland's band, and backed jazz stars like Hank Crawford and Abbey Lincoln. He learned blues, jazz, soul, R&B, funk, and gospel, and by the time he made his re-debut as a bandleader with the Bob Greenlee-produced Lucky Strikes! in 1989, Peterson was a triple-threat multi-instrumentalist who managed to fuse R&B, jazz, gospel, funk, and rock with the blues. All of this leads up to this very personal and semi-autobiographical set, and his 18th album as a bandleader. The Son of a Bluesman, aside from being another fine set of Peterson's joyous fusion blues, is also the first of his albums that he has produced himself, and it has a warm, career-summing kind of feel to it. The title track, "The Son of a Bluesman," and the two different versions of the gospel-themed "I'm Still Here," give this album a personal and retrospective feel, as does the striking, and even silly "Joy," a straight-up family home recording featuring a rap interlude. But perhaps the best and most poignant track on an album full of standouts is the lovely instrumental "Nana Jarnell," dedicated to both Peterson's mother and his wife's mother, musician, singer, and songwriter Tamara Stovall-Peterson. Peterson's guitar lead on the track is a marvel of crying, elegantly balanced phrasing, almost horn-like or vocal-like, and it speaks and sings like the marvel it is. This is perhaps Peterson's most well-rounded and personal album yet, and it coheres in a wonderful arc, capturing the blues as an ever-flowing, joyous, and ultimately uplifting thing. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Blues - Released October 25, 2019 | Jazz Village

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Blues - Released January 1, 1997 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Call this Peterson's 'back to my roots' blues album, but it finds him in more retro territory than his previous outings. There's a distinctive Albert King-Freddie King-Albert Collins almost-'70s feel to all the music here and the support of roots players like Johnny B. Gayden, Dennis Chambers and Butch Bonner makes this much more of a ensemble effort. Highlights include the storming "You're the One for Me," a great King-like solo on "Tin Pan Alley," an instrumental tribute to Albert Collins on "Pickin'" and oddball covers of the Isley Brothers' "It's Your Thing" and Prince's "Purple Rain." Peterson is stylistically all over the road on this disc but his versatility on both guitar and keyboards ultimately pays off in the end. © Cub Koda /TiVo
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Blues - Released October 9, 2017 | Jazz Village

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When you utter the words Hammond B-3, one name and one name only comes to mind: Jimmy Smith! It is to this master of the organ who Lucky Peterson pays homage to on his aptly named album Tribute To Jimmy Smith. The disc will appear on the label Jazz Village on 13th October 2017 (with pre-orders available as of today on Qobuz in Hi-Res 24-Bit!), where Peterson is surrounded by virtuosic partners among which we find Kelyn Crapp, the young guitar prodigy from San Francisco. Throughout the album, Peterson proves to be an agent of a long musical history that is anchored in blues yet remains very open to other influences. We find here a clear jazz pulse, the groove of rhythm’n’blues as well as the energy of rock’n’roll. As for the repertoire, the classics from Smith (The Sermon, The Champ) mix beautifully with other jazz’n’blues gems. From the very first few bars of Night Train by Jimmy Forest (featuring the French trumpeter Nicolas Folmer) one finds that groove takes off instantly and that Lucky Peterson sets the B-3 on fire as fast as lightening! It’s impossible to not tap your feet along to the beat for the whole hour of this wonderful tribute. © CM/Qobuz
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Blues - Released April 8, 2016 | JSP Records

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It is understood to the listener from the first seconds of the album: Lucky Peterson will never abandon the blues. As impressive on the guitar as with his impressive vocals, he is accompanied here by what is becoming a basic blues setup: piano, bass and drums. This is not as if to say that Long Nights is devoid of a unique personality. Lucky Peterson hits a guitar of his own – undeniable skill at rhythm and picking. Using his Dobro, the listener is brought to a time that seems all but too distant to understand. From country blues to slow electric blues, Chicago boogie and more... An entire repertoire is reviewed and personalized here. A vintage and authentic parenthesis amidst the digital synthesizer that dominates music today. © RB/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2001 | Blue Thumb

As one of the most versatile players in blues, Lucky Peterson ranks among the best of the best. His first release for the Blue Thumb label, Double Dealin' showcases the artist on 12 great songs soaked in the sentiments and emotions that characterize the blues style. Peterson plays the lead guitar, the Hammond B3, and sings his gut-wrenching blue notes with a great band that includes Johnny Lee Schell on rhythm guitar, Jon Cleary on keyboards, Reggie McBride on bass guitar, Tony Braunagel on drums and Tamara Peterson on background vocals. The Texacali Horns back the personnel with exceptional clarity using a serious combination of brass techniques. Peterson's use of an emotionally direct style is also rapidly establishing him as a great storyteller. "When My Blood Runs Cold," "4 Little Boys," and "Remember the Day" are among the themes he deals with from an original perspective and are among the standouts of the hard blues intonations. This CD is reflective of the successful urban blues techniques used on his previous efforts in that it specifically captures the essence of both the "chitlin circuit" and the electric blues associated with the Chicago style without compromising the traditional aspects of the blues form. A welcome addition to any blues collection. © Paula Edelstein /TiVo
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Blues - Released October 19, 2012 | Blackbird Music

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Blues - Released January 1, 1993 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Once Peterson arrived at Verve, his taste in material seemed to sail right out the window. This disc is confusingly unfocused (rock influences are as prominent as blues) and a far cry indeed from his fine Alligator sets of a precious few years before. © Bill Dahl /TiVo
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Blues - Released May 18, 2015 | Jazz Village

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Blues - Released August 28, 2020 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

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Jazz - Released February 24, 2003 | Dreyfus Jazz

Black Midnight Sun is the first release on the Dreyfus label by multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Lucky Peterson, joined here by producer Bill Laswell on bass and former Parliament/Funkadelic drummer Jerome "Bigfoot" Braily. While the disc features a few Peterson originals, the majority of the album relies on cover versions. Luckily, Peterson picked several that he's well suited to tackle, including "Herbert Harper's Free Press" (Muddy Waters), "Lucky in Love" (Mick Jagger), "Is It Because I'm Black" (Syl Johnson), "Jody's Got Your Girl and Gone" (Johnnie Taylor), "Talkin' Loud and Saying Nothing" (James Brown), and "Thank You for Talkin' to Me Africa" (Sly Stone). Black Midnight Sun is a combination of electric blues, rock, soul, and funk that, for the most part, works just fine. © Al Campbell /TiVo
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Blues - Released May 24, 2011 | Dixiefrog

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Jazz - Released October 4, 2010 | Dreyfus Jazz

Lucky Peterson shows off his instrumental versatility on this mostly acoustic set by switching between piano, Duolian resonator guitar, and electric guitar. Vocally he's still at the top of his game and shows plenty of fire and versatility on this set by mixing renditions of blues and gospel classics with tunes from the pens of more contemporary writers like Ray LaMontagne and Tom Waits. He turns in a gritty vocal and shows off his considerable slide guitar chops on Robert Johnson's "I Believe I'll Dust My Broom," moving from icy slides to flurries of muted staccato notes. He plays Willie McTell's "Statesboro Blues" like a straightforward Chicago blues using his slide to support his wailing vocals. Larry Campbell adds some unexpectedly funky blues mandolin to the track. "Death Don't Have No Mercy," the Rev. Gary Davis tune that became a folk hit in the '60s, is taken at a slow, soulful pace with several long, chilling Resonator excursions. LaMontagne's "Trouble" gets a slow reading with Peterson bringing a gospel flavor to his piano work, while his vocals are full of long, sustained notes and sanctified moans of emotion. "I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free" was written by Billy Taylor, but became a civil rights anthem due to a recording of the tune by Nina Simone. Peterson's wife, Tamara, joins him on the track to trade lead vocal chores. She proves herself a worthy vocal partner with her powerful vocals matching her husband's in fervor and power. Their playful give and take on the tune's coda is one of the album's high points. Peterson closes by turning Curtis Mayfield's "Think," from the Superfly soundtrack, into a country blues with his electric guitar solos sharing space with Campbell's pedal steel. © j. poet /TiVo
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Blues - Released December 2, 1992 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Lucky Peterson is a smooth operator, cool and always in control with a guitar tone reminiscent of the more restrained sides of Roy Buchanan or Carlos Santana. He's capable of lashing out, though, as the livewire showstopper "Don't Cloud Up On Me" ably proves. But this versatile musician is most distinctive with his Hammond organ and Wurlitzer electric piano sound, instruments that he's been playing professionally since the age of five. Check out the heady swirl of instrumental workout "Junk Yard" on this front although comparisons to Billy Preston will be inevitable. © Roch Parisien /TiVo
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Blues - Released March 14, 2011 | JSP

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Blues - Released June 18, 2009 | Alligator Records

Blues - Released May 25, 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Blues - Released January 1, 1999 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

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Blues - Released August 25, 2014 | JSP Records

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Blues - Released February 1, 2010 | JSP Records